State College News Senior Class to Hold Elections March 9

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State College News
NEW
YORK STATE COLLEGE F O R TEACHERS
ESTABLISHED BY THE CLASS OF 1918
VOL. VII
No. 20
ALBANY, N. Y., MARCH 9, 1923
Senior Class to Hold Elections
March 9
State's Five Defeated on
Trip North
Commencement Announcements
This Week
ST. LAWRENCE GAME FAST
K A P PUTS FIVE ON COURT
The State College basket ball five
met defeat in the last two games of
the season played with Clarkson and
St. Lawrence. State's five were at
a disadvantage because they played
on strange courts in both games.
At Clarkson the court was very
large and the Clarkson five were
playing a fast game. They cut in
from the corner which the State men
were unaccustomed to, and the first
half ended with the score III and G,
During the second half State held
down its end of the playing and had
possession of the ball a greater share
of tin.' time. The final score stood
53 to 11 in Clarkson's favor.
ChHcson made ample provision
for the comfort of the State five.
The fraternity houses extended a
welcome to tlie visitors and entertained them in a fine manner.
Tlie St. Lawrence game, while a
defeat for the Purple and Gold,
showed some excellent work on the
part of the men,
At the end of the first six minutes
neither team had scored any points,
and at the end of the first sixteen
minutes the score was a tie, '1 and 'I.
During the second half State's
five kept up its splendid work, and
every man played a fast and hard
game. Coach Suavely said that ho
had no fault to find with any man
on the team.
State has reason to feel proud of
its final score of 2!)—13 for until
last week St. Lawrence had not been
beaten on its home court for
eighteen years.
From the way in which the wearers of the Purple and Gold have
played this year, State may look
forward to a hard working and winning team for the next basket ball
season.
The score:
Clarkson
f.b.
f.p.
t.p.
Larson, r.f.
0
0
12
French l.f.
0
0
0
Rasce, r.g.
7
0
14
B'ridgc, c.
8
0
16
McDonald, c.
0
0
0
Calderella, r.g.
1
0
2
McGuiggan, r.g.
1
7
0
fn order that the 1923 Pedagogue
may contain soma mention of tho
Senior Class activities at Commencement, it has been decided to hold
elections Cor these senior officers on
March !). The nominations an; as
follows: Historian, Agnes Smith, Ituth
Tefl't, Vera Nolan; Poet: Vera Nolan,
Marjorie Sinnott; Prophet: Edith
Sanders, Marjorie Sibley; Testator:
Caroline Lierberick, Clarissa Huyokj
Tonstmistress for senior breakfast:
Viola Holmes, Quoene Hotnan, Anne
Nachman; Speakers for senior breakfast: Elsie Leonard, Susan Collier,
May Wood, Ethel Rush, Clarahelle
Whitcomb, Eira Williams, Katherinc
Driscoll, Florence Dorsey, Hose
Yaguda.
Commencement
announcements
must be ordered on or before Friday,
March I) from the members of tlie
committee which includes Marjorie
Mathewson, Clonnon Easman, Catherine Hanley, and Marjorie Smith.
Some members of tlie committee will
be at a table in the rotunda each
morning from nine until eleven and
in the afternoon,
SENIORS TO DANCE MARCH 17
The seniors will hold their informal
party in the college gymnasium Saturday evening
March 17. Interesting plans are under way to make this
senior hop one of the jolliest good
times that '23 has ever staged. Prom
the very beginning the affair promises to be a success. Witness the
appropriate harmony between the
senior's colors and the verdant
emblem of St. Patrick's Day, for
green and white will constitute the
color scheme. Dancing will be in
order from 8—12. McGurke's orchestra will furnish the music. The
hop is to be quite exclusive—seniors
(Continued on page 4)
PAY FOR PED. BEFORE EASTER
COLLEGE CALENDAR
Friday, March 9
Chemistry Club Meeting
Chemistry Dept., 4:00 P. M.
Sophomore Soiree
College Gym., 8:30 P. M.
Saturday, March 10
New York Trio
Chancellors' Hall, 8:15 P. M.
Monday, March 12
French Club Meeting
Room 100, 4:00 P. M.
Mathematics Club Meeting
Room 201, 4:20 P. M.
Tuesday. March 13
Y. W. C. A. Meeting
Room B, 3:00 P. M.
Wednesday, March 14
Newman Club Sale
Lower Hall, 2:00 P. M.
NEW YORK TRIO HERE
SATURDAY
Tomorrow night at eight fifteen in
Chancellors' Hall, students of tho
college and the music lovers of
Albany will enjoy one of the finest
concerts of the season and certainly
among the best State! College lias ever
presented, The New York Trio, presented by the Music Association, will
hold us as the Lotz Quartet did a few
weeks ago.
' The program is as follows:
I Schubert, Trio in B flat, major
opus 99
Allegro — Moderate
Andanto con poco mosso
Scherzo—• Allegro
Rondo, Allegro vivace
II Tscharkowsky
Trio in A minor, opus 50
Theme and Variations
III Arbos, Spanish Dance
Wolf Ferrari, Largo
Grieg, Norweigan Dance
THE CHEMISTRY CLUB
ANNOUNCES ITS PROGRAM
Tho secret is out at last!
On
March I'!, under the auspices of the
Chemistry Club, there will be presented in tlie auditorium of the
college moving pictures showing the
processes employed in the manufacture of soap. These pictures are the
property of, and are being shown by
Kirkman and Son. There are two
reels, one entitled " The Making of
Soap," and the other "Behind the
Wrapper."
But. in addition to these remarkable pictures, wo arc to have an animated cartoon, "Fishing," and a regular picture entitled "Shocks of
Doom." (Sit down; don't got excited.)
This galaxy of events is being :
offered to the public absolutely free j
of charge. It is hoped that the entire !
student body and their friends will
attend.
$3.00 per year
Sophomore Soiree March 9
Soiree is almost here. The sophomores are looking forward to tonight
with great expectancy. Plans have
been carefully carried out und there
is nothing to mar tho pleasure of the
evening. Nearly one hundred sophomores have signed up to go. If all
attend it will be one of the biggest
soirees held in several years, Dancing begins at 8:30 and ends at 12:30.
The programme consists of sixteen
dances, eight in eacii half. The last
dance in each half will be a waltz.
The patrons and patronesses art;:
President Brubacher, Dean Horner,
Dean Pierce, Mr. anil Mrs. York anil
Mr, and Mrs. Walker.
State College
f.b.
f.p.
Breslaw, r.f.
1
0
Gainor, l.f.
0
0
Landon, c.
0
0
0
0
Junckett, r.g.
Katon, l.g.
3
0
Hornung, c.
1
J
Shirley, r.g.
0
0
t.p
2
0
0
0
r,
3
0
Totals
SUMMARY
Score at half time—Clarkson, 3 1 ;
State College, 5. Referee—Maxey
The basket ball team of the Kappa
Delta Rho Fraternity was defeated
last Thursday night by the University Club of Rensselaer, the score
being 11 to 17.
Tho K A P men were working
under difficulties for the court was
a professional one and there were
no backboards which seriously hindered the basket shooting, but in
spite of this every man played a good
game and gave the University five
a tough fight. Landon had a good
eye for the basket and Hornung made
some clever shots which hit their
mark and piled up scores for the
Fraternity men.
University Club of Rens.
f.p.
t.p.
f.b.
Dm mm, r.f.
1
0
2
Welch, l.f.
1
0
2
Sonnett c.
2
0
4
Campbell, r.g.
1
0
2
Barney, l.g.
2
3
7
Bonacker, c.
0
0
0
Totals
23
7
53
(Continued on column 'I)
Totals
7
3
(Continued on page 4)
17
REPORT OF RESIDENCE HALL CAMPAIGN RESULTS
WEEK ENDING MARCH 3, 1923
TOTAL FIGURES TO FEBRUARY 24, 1923
Total number of persons pledged
1006
Total amount pledged and contributed
$83,466.64
Total amount of cash actually paid in on pledges, $19,090.80
FIGURES FOR WEEK FEBRUARY 24—MARCH 3
New pledges received
4
New amounts pledged and contributed
425.00
Weeks total cash paid on pledges
245.00
GRAND TOTAL MARCH 3, 1923
Number of pledges
Amount pledged and contributed
Cash paid on pledges to date
1010
$83,891.64
U9.335.S0
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 9, 1923
Fage l"v
&>ti\t? (Ballttp 5 t a a
Vol. VII
March !)
No.
20
Published weekly during the college
year by tlie Student Body of the iNcw
York State College for Teachers at
Albany, New V'ork,
The subscription rate is three dollars per year, Advertising rates may
be bad on application to the business
manager.
(Articles, manuscripts, etc, must be
in the hands of the editors before Monday of the week of publication.)
Editor-in-Chief
Robert MacFarlano, '23
Managing Editor
Vera Nolan, '23
Business Manager
Grace Fox, '23
Subscription Manager
Eire Williams, '23
Assistant Subscription Manager
Ruth Tefft, '23
Assistant Business Managers
Edith Saunders, '23
Dorothy Jones, '24
Associate Editors
Dorothy Dangremond, '23
Doris Butler, '23
Dorothy V. liennit, '24
Reporters
Margery Bayless, '24
Mildred Kuhn, '24
Agnes E. Nolan, '24
Helen M. Orr, '24
Muriel Weber, '24
PAY FOR PED. BEFORE EASTER
NOTICE
It is a custom for all students at
State College to refrain from carrying books and papers into Student
Assembly on Friday mornings. This
custom, it is hoped, will be kept as
faithfully this year as it has been in
the past.
SPRING IS COMING
The spring sport season is almost
at hand. In a few more weeks, we
hope it will bo weeks, tennis racquets
and baseball bats will bo the popular
weapons. Snowshoeing, skating, and
skiing have had their full swing foi
many long months.
Now their
season is over, and the mind wanders
to the moans of recreation during
the warm, green days that arc
coming.
Now is a good time to plan for
the sports that are to be in vogue.
Now is a good time to get that new
bat or racquet, What a relief it will
be to get out of doors for a while
to enjoy a fast match or game. No
more shut in days. The world is
about to be opened. Better be ready
to start the season with a bang.
Don't let the pent up spirit of winter
be wasted.
CORRECTION
Our attention has been called to a
mistake that appeared in the issue of
February 16. One of our contributors irj an article entitled "The
Coach and His Salary" stated that
athletic scholarships were paid at
Hamilton. Hamilton is not following
this policy, and the writer was misinformed in regard to this fact,
While the editors do not assume any
responsibility for statements appearing under "Student Comment" we
take pleasure in correcting this error,
STUDENT COMMENT
MYSKANIA
During our freshman days, the
eleven or twelve black-robed figures
that appeared before us from time
to time, inspired us with awe, and
seemed to symbolize to us everything
that we wanted our college to stand
for. It's true that they didn't seem
to do much except appear once in a
while in chapel and at college functions, looking wise and dignified.
Nevertheless, they stood for something in our eyes and, after all, we
decided that Myskania was another
of those positions with lots of honor
and very little work.
However, with the appearance of
a new body of Myskania, and a new
class, things seemed to change. This
organization seemed to be taking a
great deal of power into its hands
and to actually begin interfering
with some of our special privileges,
They even began to object to things
which we considered perfectly right
and they seemed to be turning everyone against us. Immediately, then,
like little children, we "set up a
howl" and resolved to revolt.
After coming so far in college,
are we after all, only children? Of
course the members of Myskania
are only students like ourselves, and
we have had practically no voice in
choosing them. But they are seniors
who,
for that reason alone, should
deserve our respect; and they have
indirectly, in our groups and "gangs"
been] thci chosen,' leaders. Do you
think that it.is an easy task for even
upper classmen to decide the problems- of their fellow students in an
impartial way? Of course we can
not always approve of their acts for
we do not know all the facts of the
case, and we are not capable of
judging them since we are prejudiced.
But surely you cannot
imagine your sister class and your
own friends deliberately plotting
against you and turning everyone
else against you. Let's not be little
children any longer and determine
to have "an eye for an eye, and a
tooth for a tooth," but let's show
Myskania that we still honor and
respect them. "Be a sport!"
'25
FRENCH FETE A SUCCESS
music of it, as they would be if
Friday evening the French FH<
strangers were; taking part."
But
when Chief Os-Ke-Non-Ton began to was held in the gym which was ver;
sing and to bent the tom-tom off attractively decorated for the ovcnl
stage in preparation for his most The booths too were very attraetivi
effective entrance, effective because with all their French articles. One <,i
he was apparently as unconscious of the most popular booths was that ol
the audience as if he were alone in French pastries, because of its grenl
a still place in the woods, it was dis- quantities and varieties of gout;
tinctly jarring to have a girl whisper things to eat, for nothing in this lim
piercingly, "Oh, I'm so scared, aren't had been neglected. The candj
you? Isn't it thrilling?" and to have booth was very popular, and also
others add further comments which the doll booth. This year the doll
did not stop then but continued at were dressed in provincial costum>\intervals during his other songs.
and were very pretty. One of the
There are several reasons why improvements over last year was
people should not talk nor create the increase and variety of novelties
any kind of a disturbance during H and French goods.
On the whole
performance, • First, it is unfair to the fete was very successful with its
those who have come to listen, as booths.
it frequently prevents them not only
The entertainment was all thai
from hearing everything but also could bo expected and a little l>i!
from entering into the spirit of the more with its dancing and solo..
thing. Further, the topics discussed One of the big features of the en
during the performance could just tortainment was a French folk dance
as well be discussed somewhere else <which was very pretty with the girls
at some other time without any in the dance dressed in costume,
great loss to those Interested in them, j The rest of the evening was given
Indeed, the people who talk might
over to dancing, and everyone en
be benefited by the performance if i
joyed a good time.
they would give their whole attenAs yet the financial returns have
tion to it, Moreover, nothing is
not been reported, but we all look
mo-c discourteous or disturbing to ; forward t o a grQ(it
mcccm
an artist than to have a continuous [
talking or whispering going on. Mr. !
Hugh Walpole met such an annoying
Y. W. BIBLE LECTURES
situation very effectively in his reDue to the fact that State Inst
Cent lecture here. Two people wore tutions do not include courses i;
keeping up a steady conversation in Bible study in their curiculi, Stall
the back of the hall. After looking , College has never had any systema
at them several times, Mr Walpole tj Zf , ( | instruction along religious lines
stopped his lecture and told them to 1 There have been ir past yea
leave the room. And they had paid j mission study classes and re!
over two dollars for their seats.
i lectures conducted under tin
Perhaps such punishment would
pices of the Newman Club andd Y. W
correct the bad habit into which
This year, beginning wit
some of the college students have C. A.
fallen. But when they realize that Monday, March 5, there will be .
their careless behavior at public series of talks on different books ol
gatherings will give outsiders a very the Bible by outside speakers. Thesi
bail impression not only of them but talks to be held on Mondey after
of State College, their loyalty, it i noons in the auditorium from 'I unti
certain, will not let them fat their 5 o'clock will be most informal. Il
Alma Mater.
is urged that all interested student.attend.
STATE COLLEGE and COURTESY
Most of the students of State
College attended the concert given
two weeks ago at Chancellors' flail.
It was a good performance, so very
good that to have it marred by the
rude behavior of some of the college
students, seemed a shame. They whispered, laughed, and even talked
during almost the entire evening.
The disturbance began when the
college orchestra appeared for the
first selection on the program;
"Who's that girl in the red dress?
I don't like it, do you? Too conspicuous." And so they continued to
to discuss other members of the
orchestra while people who wished to
enjoy the music glared ineffectually
at the offenders. The appearance of
the college chorus gave further
opportunity for a discussion of
clothes, hair-dressing and posture.
At first a lenient observer doubtless thought, "Well, those college'
students probably think that it
doesn't matter if they do talk as it's
their orchestra and chorus, which
they've heard so many times before
that they aren't so interested in this
part of the program, at least in the
NEWMAN CAKE SALE
Every year Newman Club announ
ces that she will have a cake sal..
and every year this announcement is
followed by the same result: much
Elinor Buell, '23 returned from baking of cake and boiling of candj
her home at Goshen, N. Y., Tuesday ny the active club members, and
March 2(i. Her father, who has been more buying and eating of these' good
things by the entire student body.
ill, is much better.
This year's sale, held on Thursday.
Francis Du Bois, '25 entertained February 13, was no exception. Th"
her sister, Miss Bertha Du Bois, for fudge may have seemed a little bit
richer anil the stuffed dates a 1 i111«over the week-end.
Elsie Leonard, '23, Marie Burgen, bit more delicious than in former
years, but this was probably due in
'25, Madeline Graves, '25, Elizabeth part to the vista of the oandyless
Murray, '25, Hermionc Brabb, '25, lenten season to start on the morrow.
Madeline Hohl, '24, Marion Farrell, The committee, under the able di'24, Betty Hartnett, '25, Ethel Pal- rection of Catherine Hanley, '23, saw
that everyone was satisfied and that
icosky, '24, Vernice Wilson, '25, none
went away hungry. The pro
Zelma Gorman, '20, Mildred White- coeds from the sale amounted to
giver, '25, Helen Kirtland, '25, about fifty dollars. This means thai
Helen Orr,'24 and Alice Leidman,'25 ; the Newman delegate from State _ to
atended the Sophomore Soiree at! the Cliff Haven Conference, which
Union on Friday, March 2.
| is held every summer, will this year
Beatrice Martin, '24 has returned "travel in style with the best ol
to college after her recent illness.
j them."
'Round the College
DR. BRUBACHER ADDRESSES
STUDENT BODY
Dr. Brtibacher addressed the Student Assembly Friday
morning,
March 2, on the subject of scholarship. In his speech he made reference to our mid-year experiences.
Although wo are sorry for the failures, which
occurred,
wherever
standards are set there are always
some who fall below them, but standards have to be maintained.
In
speaking of colleges and failures,
Edison's opinion on the subject was
expressed. It seems that Edison has
no use for college graduates, for ho
regards them as lazy, says that they
expect to be made superintendents
after a three day's job, and that they
won't do hard work but must wear
stiff collars. More-over, he charges
college men with not knowing anything. In proof of this he has prepared a questionnaire of one hundred
and fifty questions and found that
out of five hundred men only one
man knew how to answer the questions correctly and he was not a
college graduate. After such charges as these, made by as successful
a man as Edison, it behooves a college
student to consider himself seriously.
The causes of these complaints
and of college failures has been attributed to bothering too much with
careless disinterested pupils in high
school and literally dragging them
into college. Entrance examinations
have, to a certain extent, checked
this inflow, but even under this system many people gain entrance to
college who ought never to be there.
(Continued on page 4)
PAY FOR PED. BEFORE EASTER
PUBLIC SALES
We have purchased 122,000 pair
U, S. Army Munson last shoes, steos
5J/£ to 12 which was the entire surplus stock of one of the largest U. S.
Government shoe contractors.
This shoe is guaranteed one hundred percent solid leather, color dark
tan, bellows tongue, dirt and waterproof. The actual value of this shoe
is $6.00. Owing to this tremendous
buy we can offer same to the public
at $2.95.
Send correct size. Pay postman on
delivery or send money order. If
shoos are not as represented we will
cheerfully
refund
your
money
promptly upon request.
National Bay State Shoe Co.
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 9, 1923
Page Three
Factory Samples
Factory Rejects
ADVERTISEMENT
FOR S A L E at A discount:—Cap and
gown in fine condition - made of the
best grade of French serge furnished
by Cotrell and Leonard. Style IOC.
Size of cap - 7 In. Gown can be adjusted to fit any size.
A clever
alumna who desires to contribute to
the Residence Hall Fund has turned
over her cap and gown to the Committee for sale. Anyone desiring to
see same with idea of purchase may
apply to Dean Pierce.
JX^O B E IL.T
POPULAR PRICE SHOE STORE
"The Busy Shoe Corner"
CROSSETT—STETSON—SLATER—RALSTON
$3.85 to $5.85
85 SOUTH PEARL STREET
Jl
BOTLES
1
K-
ALBANY, N. Y.
J>
U Af
-P
The "PRACTICAL" Alchemist and
^THEORETICAL" Robert Boyle
3HE alchemists wrote
vaguely of "fluids" and
"principles." Copper
was potentially silver.
Rid it of its red color and the
"principle" of silver would assert
itself, so that silver would remain.
With a certain amount of philosopher's stone (itself a mysterious
"principle") a base metal could be
converted into a quantity of gold
a million times as great.
This all sounded so "practical"
that Kings listened credulously,
but the only tangible result was
that they were enriched with much
bogus gold.
Scientific theorists like Robert
Boyle (1627-1691) proved more
"practical" by testing matter, discovering its composition and then
drawing scientific conclusions that
could thereafter be usefully and
honestly applied. Alchemists conjectured anddied; he experimented
and lived.
Using the air pump Boyle undertook a "theoretical" but sci-
entific experimental study of the
atmosphere and discovered that
it had a "spring" in it, or in other
words that it could expand. He
also established the connection
between the boiling point of water
and atmospheric pressure, a very
"theoretical" discovery in his day
but one which every steam engineer now applies.
He was the first to use the term
"analysis" in the modern chemical sense, the first to define an
element as a body which cannot
be subdivided and from which
compounds can be reconstituted.
Boyle's work has not ended.
Today in the Research Laboratories of the General Electric
Company it is being continued.
Much light has there been shed
on the chemical reactions that
occur in a vessel in which a nearly
perfectvacuum has been produced.
One practical result of this work
is the vacuum tube which plays an
essential part in radio work and
roentgenology.
GeneralfpElecftric
Qeneral Office
C O H i p a n V
Schtnectady^N.Y.
296 Broadway
New York, N. Y.
»
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, MARCH 9, 1923
P a g e Fout
DR. B R U B A C H E R A D D R E S S E S
STUDENT BODY
( C o n t i n u e d from p a g e 3 )
T h e n , too, t h e a t t i t u d e of college
s t u d e n t s theirselvos on t h e s u b j e c t Of
scholarship a c c o u n t s for m a n y failures.
College people have never
respected, scholarship;
they
havea l w a y s scorned g r i n d s a n d used t h e
word a s a t e r m of r e p r o a c h , w h e r e a s
it should be r e g a r d e d a s an honor.
M o r e o v e r , t h e a t t i t u d e t a k e n on t h e
question of cuts is t o be criticized,
for s t u d e n t s should r e a l i z e t h e y a r e
only i n j u r i n g themselves when t a k i n g
them carelessly.
T h e a b s e n c e of a
professor ought t o be considered a
serious m a t t e r instead of a j o k e , for
why should people r e j o i c e over n o t
g e t t i n g w h a t they h a v e paid for,
Although
some
people
think
scholarship applies only t o g r e a t r e search m e n and t o people of g r e a t
ability, this is n o t t r u e .
Scholarship
is a h a b i t of the mind a n d applies to
r e g u l a r every-day s t u d e n t s . Scholarship, viewed in this light, is composed
of f o u r cdements; t h e first, h a b i t u a l
resistance to s u g g e s t i o n , m e a n s t h a t
a scholar should n o t a c c e p t everyt h i n g told him, b u t he should m a k e
mental reservations and form the
habit of verifying his own ideas a n d
o t h e r people's s t a t e m e n t s by careful
observation and investigation.
The
f o r m i n g of this habit c o n s t i t u t e s t h e
second e l e m e n t of s c h o l a r s h i p . T h e
third e l e m e n t , o p e n - m i n d e d n e s s , involves a willingness t o c o n s i d e r b o t h
viewpoints of a q u e s t i o n a n d t o
r e s e r v e j u d g m e n t until
absolutely
s u r e of t h e c o r r e c t viewpoint. I n d u s t r y , t h e f o u r t h e l e m e n t , is p e r h a p s
the m o s t i m p o r t a n t of all, f o r unless
one is i n d u s t r i o u s n o t h i n g will be
accomplished in business or school
life.
I n d u s t r y , in t h e b i g g e r sense
of t h e word, applies t o world p r o b lems of l a b o r a n d p r o d u c t i o n , a n d t o
be really i n d u s t r i o u s o n e m u s t be
interested in such s u b j e c t s a n d wellversed on t h e m , as well a s personally
ambitious.
These four e l e m e n t s : —
resistance to suggestion, investigation, o p e n - m i n d e d n e s s , a n d I n d u s t r y
spell success for a n y b o d y . I n r e f e r e n c e to college life t h e y spell schola r s h i p , a n d statistics f r o m H a r v a r d ,
Columbia a n d Union p r o v e t h a t a
large p e r c e n t a g e of those r a n k i n g
high in scholarship m e e t w i t h success
In l a t e r life.
So t h e n , if college
people a r e real s t u d e n t s t h e y will n o t
m e e t with f a i l u r e b u t with success.
HOME
ECONOMIC
NOTES
S e v e r a l m e m b e r s of t h e f a c u l t y
a r e in R o c h e s t e r in a t t e n d a n c e a t a
c o n f e r e n c e on H o m e E c o n o m i c s E d u cation. T h e m e e t i n g is with H e a d s
of D e p a r t m e n t s a n d D i r e c t o r s of
Homo E c o n o m i c s T e a c h e r T r a i n i n g
Courses.
PAY FOR PED. BEFORE EASTER
SENIORS TO DANCE MARCH 17
(Continued from page 1)
a n d class officers o n l y a r e invited.
Bids will be $2. T h e c o m m i t t e e in
c h a r g e of t h e a f f a i r a r e :
General
c h a i r m a n , V e r a N o l a n ; Music, E d i t h
Sanders;
Refreshments,
Victoria
Peterson
and
Marjorie
Sinnott;
Decorations,
Clarabelle
Whitcomb
a n d D o r a B o y c e ; O r d e r s , [Catherine
Driscoll; Floor, Ethel Rusk.
PAY FOR PED. BEFORE EASTER
STATE'S FIVE DEFEATED ON
TRIP NORTH
(Continued from page 1)
K a p p a Delta R h o .
f.b.
f.p.
H o r n u n g , r.f.
1
5
P u g h , l.f.
0
0
L a n d o n , c.
1
0
C r a n e , l.g.
L
0
J u c k e t t , r.g.
0
0
Totals
t.p.
7
0
2
2
0
II
.'!
SUMMARY
S c o r e a t half
time—University
Club, 8 ; Kappa D e l t a Rho, 5. Referee—Do ran.
Timekeeper—Crawford.
Fouls c o m m i t t e d — U n i v e r s i t y ,
1 2 ; K a p p a D e l t a R h o , 0. T i m e of
periods—Twenty minutes.
PAY FOR P E D . B E F O R E
EASTER
Albany, N. Y.
STEEL ENGRAVERS TO
AMERICAN UNIVERSITIES
Graduation Invitations
Class J e w e l r y
Personal Cards
I t is a m a r k of distinction
to use m e r c h a n d i s e
marked Quayle
S a m p l e s of Wedding' S t a t i o n e r y
upon request
Proper
Styles,
Correct
Forms,
M o d e r a t e Cost
SPRING SILKS and WOOLENS
ARRIVING DAILY
Come and See Them
Perkins Silk Shop
128 State Street
Gustave Lorey, Photographer
The Studios
176 State Street
360 Broadway
Saratoga Springs, N. Y.
Albany, N. Y.
Photographer to the Pedagogue
1920-1921-1923
The highest form of the photographic art, done under my
personal supervision in finely appointed studios is my
offering at special prices to all N. Y. S. C. T. Students
G. W i l e y & B r o .
^^Sdm^^%
Dealers in All Kinds of
W
E make fountain pens write.
We have the tools and
the men who know
how, right here in our
store, where we have
repaired thousands.
«7nVPEN CORNER.
*
Fresh
a n d Salt
and
Meat
Poultry
348 State Street, Corner Lark
Telephones 044 and 543
IF YOU
CO-OPERATE
\/7
WITH THE
"CO-OP"
C5TABU5HEO • 11307 ' ^ « r ~ T l i ! *
CORNER-HUDSON AVE.mo SO.PEARU
We
will
supply
College
all
your
Needs
ALBANY PRINT SHOP, Inc.
394-396 BROADWAY
PRINTERS
ALBANY, N. Y.
Special Attention Given W o r k
for Student Societies
O F T II E S T A T E C O L L E G E
NEWS
FRANK H. EVORY & CO.
Quality
SILKS
A n d Drena G o o d a A t
HEWITTS SILK SHOP
Over KresKes 5 and
10c. Stores
15-17 No. Pearl Si.
Ideal Food
208 W A S H I N G T O N A V E
6 door* a b o v e Lark St
Regular Dinner 40c.—11 a. m. to 3 p. m.
Supper 40c.— 5 p . m. to 8 p . m
SUNDAY SPECIAL: Regular Dinner, 40c Special Chicken Dinner, 60c. 12 Noon lo 8 P. N.
Ideal Ser
Ideal Restaurant
Special Rates to Students
STAHLER'S
Central Avenue's Leading Confectionery
and Ice Cream Parlor
PURE WHIPPED CREAM SERVED ON SPECIALS
NO EXTRA CHARGE
All prices of box chocolates fresh from the factory
at 39 cents pound box and up
Phone W 8 6 9 J
Quayle & Son, Inc.
299 C E N T R A L AVENUE
After:
Every
Meal
WRIGLEVS
General Printers
36-38 Beaver Street
ALBANY, N. Y.
91 Steps East of Pearl Street
E x p e r t Hemstitching, Buttonholes,
Buttons, all kinds of Pleating, Trimmings and Embroidery
2 6 0 Lark Street, Albany, N. Y.
PHONE MAIN 5875
State College
and g i v e y o u r
stomach a lift
P r o v i d e s " t h e b i t of
S w e e t " In
beneficial
form.
Helps to cleanse
the teeth and keep
%\^ t h e m h e a l t h y .
Cafeteria
Luncheon or dinner 12:00—1:00
LAST £UT NOT LEAST
The Gateway Press
AT
QUALITY 'PRINTERS
YOUR ELBOW—WEST
3 3 6 Central A v e n u e
2037
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