advertisement
'it^jMni
Twtd>y, F t t n u t y Id, I N S
AL1AMY I T U O I M T M I S S
Pad C M M R Coiilimit Whmina Streak
Harpur
WHh
Wins
Over
Utka
and
The Albany State varsity basketball team won its 10th and. 11th consecutive games
SOPH GUARD Mike Bloom gaot In for an oaiy score as Dick
Cresset! and Marty Eppner are poised to assist.
over Harpur and Utica this past weekend. On Friday night, the Peds, led by Dan
Zeh's. 19 points, swamped Harpur's outclassed hoopsters, 74-44, smashing the
previous mark of nine straight wins tied earlier in the week at Oneonta. The Sauersmen then traveled to Utica on the following night to register win number 14 (3
losses) in a 60-50 triumph. Dick Crossett had 21 in that contest.
In the Harpur game,
State outscored its opponents in three of the four
quarters, and tallied 26
points to the loser's five
in the final session. At
Utica, the Peds won a big
battle, 33-27, with Jim
O'Donovan grabbing nine
and Dan Zeh eight.
State Hot i,
O'Donovan backed up Crossett in
the scoring column with 19 markers
in the Utica game, while Albany hit
on 52% of its field goal shots.
In the Washington Armory Harpur
game, State Jumped off to a 22-14
first quarter lead and built it to 3625 at halftime.
Harpur outscored the Peds 14-12
In the third period, but the Staters
In what has to be termed one of the most unsuc- poured on the steam to outhit the
cessful athletic ventures in Albany State's history, the losers by 21 points in the fourth
Ped grapplers were unable to win a single match in period.
the Peds were successan away contest with Oswego College, bowling 29-2 fulAtin Utica,
cracking the home team's first DICK CROSSETT goes high in the air to score a layup with three
and 41-0. Only matmen Lee Comeau scored for the half zone to lead at half 34-31. enemy defenders watching helplessly.
When Utica switched to man-totwo squads, drawing with his 137 pound opponent. man,
Dick Crossett broke loose for
Even Gene Monaco lost with a pin over Bin Russell (A), 13 points,
21 in all.
5:34.
his 130 pound match, only
Tomorrow night the Peds place
the second time in his three 123 pounds-Brian McCann (O) gave their 11-game win streak on the
Sutherland was the big gun,
its second straight pin, over line in an away contest with perIn AMIA basketball ac- Mert
year career at State. The Oswego
ennially powerful Plattsburgh. Here
netting 22 points, and he was backed
Tom Guilfoyle (A), 1:26.
varsity is now 3-4, the
are the point totals for the Utica tion on Sunday, Kappa Beta up Dy John Gleason who scored 14.
beat the V. I.' P's 55-33 In the Goobers overtime win over
130 pounds-Jerry Holmgren (O) game:
frosh 4-2.
ALBANY
Bob Dieck led all scorers with
pinne Mike Goldych (A), 4:45.
(League I), the Commuters APA,
Name
FG
FT
Total
19 points and he was followed by
Varsity
9
clobbered
TXO
86-16,
EEP
Crossett
9
3
21
147
pounds-Fred
Jondreau
(O)
Glen
Firestone
with 16.
123 pounds- Frank Frlsicaro (O)
4
0
8 whipped the Waterbury (IV)
Here are the league standings for
pinned Ron Smith (A) at 4:24, after scored a pin over George Gavayan Bloom
D. Zeh
1
1
3 37-26, and the Goobers League I and League IV. In Friday's
(A), 7:31.
leading in the match 3-0.
O'Donovan
8
3
19
issue of the ASP the remaining two
137 pounds-Lee Comeau (A) and 157 pounds-Albany State forfelnted, B. Zeh
4
1
9 topped APA 50-49 in double leagues will be given, along with
Frank DiMarco drew, 1-1.
giving Art Ziegler an easy victory.
26"
8
US overtime.
individual scoring leaders.
UTICA
147 pounds-Dick Shiel (O) defeated
For the Commuters, the high man
Sterling
6
0
12
Bob Verrlgnl (A), 6-4, scoring three 167 pounds-State forfeited again, the Stabler
was Joe LaReau, who tallied 26
LEAGUE I
3
0
6 points.
win
going
to
Jim
Hartz.
points in the final period.
Potter Club
3-0
Jones
1
0
2
Sal Gramaglia connected for 21 Harriers
3-1
7
2
16
ISO pounds-Brian Jones (O) scored 177 pounds-Coleman McGann (O) Brown
3-1
1
2
4 markers in Waterbury's loss to Kappa Beta
a 5-1 decision over Gene Monaco on default, as Tim Ambroslno (A) Rollman
APA
2-2
Smith
4
2
10 EEP, leading all the scorers.
(A).
was injured.
Goobers
1-1
in
KB's
win
over
the
V.I.P.'u,
•5tr
W
T
V.I.P.'s
0-1
157 pounds-Robert
Williams (O) Unlimited-Val Ryals (O) won a close
Waterbury
0-4
blanked Don Woodruff (A), 6-0.
decision over Andy Methias (A),
8-6.
LEAGUE IV
167 pounds-Tom Gustalnis (O)
* * * * *
Commuters
3-0
pinned Paul Hoffman, 1:50.
Upcoming Matches
One-Eyes
2-0
The next match for the varsity
177 pounds-Terry Ryan (O) Just
Forwards
1-0
barely got in a pin over Dick Szy- is on February 24, in a home match
APA
1-0
with R.P.I.
mansky (A), 8:57.
'
Grads
1-0
The next meet for the freshmen
Park House
1-2
Unlimited-Bill Cousins (O) overPit
1-2
powered Dick Robellotto (A), 12-2. will be on Saturday, February 19,
in a home match with Union College.
Waterbury Janitors
0-1
* * * * *
Movements
0-1
Frosh Rundown
Remaining matches for both
Waterbury
0-1
115 pounds-Richard
McBee (O) squads: Varslty-R.P.I., Brockport,
Retards
0-1
started off Oswego's frosh attack and Hobart. Frosh-Unlon, H.P.I.
•TXO
0-2
9
Oswego 'Nips Matmen,
Comeau Ties Opponent
KB, Commuters Win
ASP
SutherlandLead
In FroshVictory
Led by Gordle Sutherland's 25
points and nine ass'sts, the Albany
State frosh basketball squad topped
Albany Jr. College 84-74 last Saturday night at the Armory.
Coacli Bill Schleffelln's cagers
are now 5-3 Jn league play and 6-9
overall. The frosh are in third
place in the NCC,
The Staters shot a torrid 54%
from the floor and 72% from the
free throw line, as five men hit
for double figures.
Here is the box score for the
contest:
Name
Sutherland
Peckham
Marcus
Doody
Carey
Jursak
STATE
FG
8
U
0
4
4
0
-3T
FT
!)
2
0
6
1
0
Total
25
14
12
14
9
10
YOUR
TT
ALBANY JUNIOR COLLEGE
Daggett
11
4
26
Daly
5
3
la
Batters
1
2
4
Farnsworth
6
2
14
Holmes
5
3
13
1
0
1
Reotir
1
Moore
2
3
To-
IV
w h e t h e r u s e d h e r e or n o t
Taxt, Reference, Professional
WE'LL BUY ANY BOOK RESALABLE
BARNES & NOBLE
INCORPORATED
'
Draper Hall
135 Western Ave,
Ext. 129
Albany, N. Y.
Drop-Out?
Albany Student Press
ALBANY"3. NEW YORK
FEBRUARY 19, 1965
VOL. LI NO. 3
Referendum Draws Only Half of Required Vote
Senate Extends Referendum;
Orientation Drive to Start
by Joe
~\ eSilverman
i|
the Student Activities Office
Offici and
at the Student Personnel Office.
The voting would' be held March
2-5 p.m. in the' Commons during
the day and at the New Campus during the evening on March 2. By
bringing the vote to the New Canipus, it is hoped that more students
will participate in the election.
Inauguration would be on March 6.
In the closing hours ofWednesdc,
night's Senate, meeting the question
of the recent referendum concerning
the Interim Government was discussed. Tony Riservato, Acting
Chairman of Election Committee,
reported that only 328 votes were
cast falling far short of the 714
needed to validate the election.
The referendum showed a 7:1
ratio in favor of the new government with 282 votes for and 46
against.
President Johnston then presented
a motion to extend the referendum.
After a heated debate in which the
Tonight the Golden Eye will be
legality of the motion was questioned given over to a program of music
because of the way it was presented, and song, as various participants
it was passed 15-4-3.
tfill perforin the ethnic music of several countries. The repertory will
President Johnston's Motion
range oyer the areas of African folk'
As a result of the proposal, the ballads to original compositions..
referendum will be continued from
Included on the program tills eveFebruary 21-23. The balloting on ning will be Victoria Jones from THE CONTRAST OF student interest comes through by way of a concert and the referendum proposal.
Sunday, February 21, will be !n Jamaica, who will perform some At left Student Government draws one student to the polls, while crowds of hopefuls await their turn at
Walden Dining Room between 12 and calypsos from her island as well the 100 tickets per hour debacle.
1 p.m. and in the -Student Union as some African folk songs. Miss
5-8 p.m.
Jones will be accompanied by
Monday's and Tuesday's votes Charles Obel-Omla from Uganda.
would be in the Peristyles from 9
Also on the program tonight will
a.m. to 3 p.m.
be a 'reprise of some material that
Included in President Johnston's proved to be a resounding success
motion was the recommendation of at the summer Hootenanny. Those
Dean Neal Brown, Nancy Baumann of you who were here for the sumand himself that a public relations mer session will remember the
Senate was barely able to muster Student Tax, although they are incampaign begin on Campus to orient Irish folk tunes that were done by
The constitution of the freedom
a quorum Wednesday night but man- eligible to participate in many of Council received Senate approval
the student body on the Interim Gov- Fred LeBrun and Dick Mann.
aged to accomplish a great deal of the activities which are supported with little difficulty, but Senators
ernment. This would encompass a
They will do songs of the Irish business once the meeting started. by the Tax.
brochure describing the new govwere much more reluctant to approernment and a meeting at the New Resistance as'well as some specialty One of the first orders of business
Two appropriations were made, priate funds for the organization.
Campus in which questions on the numbers in which Mann will play was to suspend the quorum for the
The
main objection was that in
S1D0 to the Torch and $425 to the
government would l>e answered by the pennywhistle. This will be fol- night.
giving monetary support to a "faclowed with a group of ballads be
In a unanimous decision Senate Freedom Council, which also had tion," Senate was in fact supportPresident Johnston.
sung by Betli O'Dell.
voted to recommend to the Admin- its constitution approved at the ing the group's stand on various
Finally, Tim Atwell will perform istration that a graduated Student meeting.
Brochures Distributes in Moil
political and social issues.
some folk songs tiiat he lias written Tax be charged. Under this recom
The brochures will be distributed himself.
Botli proposals touched off a good
Botli Atwell and Miss O'Dell mendation, only half of the regular
At the final vote, the majority of
in the mailboxes in the residence accompany themselves on the guitar.
deaf of debate. The Torch wanted Senate decided to give the group
Student Tax would lie charged to
halls and mailed to commuters.
The Golden Eye is a coffee house part-time undergraduates, and no the money to purchase 300 extra tiie money, and take the chance of
President Johnston expressed his that is open to both students and
yearbooks. Many Senators felt that setting a precedent for dealing with
hope that through this drive to ac- faculty. It is open every Friday charge would be made for graduate the extra books were not necessary, other politically-oriented groups.
students.
quaint tiie students the referendum evening between 9:00 and midnight,
hut William Colgan, Editor, pointed
Under the present system, gradIt jwas nearly 10:30 p.m. before
would he successful.
and is in-atori at 820 Madison Ave. uates are forced to pay the regular out that the increase in enrollment Senatpj reached the business of the
warranted the additional books.
If the student body does approve
referensiwfMalections, and disposed
the Interim Government, nominaThree thousand books had orig- of the proposals which accompanied
tions will lie February 24-26.
inally
lieen
ordered,
but
the
present
tiie results in less than half an hour.
Nominations would be placed in
undergraduate enrollment is 3000. (See story column 1 this page.)
Golden Eye Presents
Ethnic Folk Music
Of Foreign Lands
Senate Approves Appropriations
Recommends Graduated Student Tax
Housing Committee Holds
Open Discussion Today
The group (which staged a similar protest on December 19) will
meet at 1:45 p.m. tomorrow on the
Washington Avenue side of the
Capitol.
STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
" '"mm
w:.i
Under ,ue leadership of statesmen Gary Delaln and Philip Lord,
Jr., a group of students will stage
a march through Albany protesting
tiie role of the United States in the
war in Vietnam.
HALL OUTSIDE BOOKSTORE
135 WESTERN AVE.
THUR - FEB 18th
FR1 - FEB 19th
High-School
Students to Protest
Vietnam Intervention
With Capitol March
CASH
BOOKS
FOR
Are You A
At 2 p.m. they will inarch down
Stale Struct to the Post Office Building, source of recruitment for many
who may serve In Vietnam.
In a circular letter Delain and
Lord staled, "In retrospect, the
situation which prompted our action
then (December 19) seems inslglflcant in comparison with the astonishing events of the past week. In
response to these recent developments and out of a deeply felt responsibility to make our protest
known through action, we will again
lie seen on the streets of Albany."
A CO-ED REGISTERS her disappointment when the rumored extension of curfew until 2 a.m. failed to materialise at the A.W.S.
meeting Tuesday night. The representatives of A.W.S. decided
to table the motion pending further investigation of the problems
involved and alternate solutions available.
The Committee on Student Housing, a subcommittee of the Student
Personnel Council, is conducting
open meetings every Friday at 1:303:30 p.m. In Draper 100.
The Committee on Student Housing
serves as an advisory committee on
student housing procedures and policies; it recommends tu the Student
Personnel Council new policies and
changes in policies.
This semester the committee will
consider several Issues of special
Interest to students who reside In
residence hails. The topics to be
considered include roommate and
housing selection, names for second quadrangle, policy of tripling
of rooms, possible establishment of
special group-living arrangement
for language majors, freshmen
housing, and off-campus housing
policies.
This cuinmlttee is comprised of
four students: Ken Drake, Liz Mulvey, Nancy Shului, and Mich Ten
Ey.ckj two faculty members: Miss
Aletha Markusei) and Mr. Hobert
McMorrls; iwo dorm directors:
Mrs. Eleanor Hathaway and Mr.
Gary Penfield; and two administrators! Dean Neil Brown and Dean
Norma Edsall, chairman of the committee.
The Committee on Student Housing
was established fast year as an outgrowth,, of the university's desire to
include students in the policy decisions relevant to student housing.
A list of nominees w
presented
to the administration by Art Johnston, SA President.
Each potential committee member
was Interviewed by tlw administration, and the four present members
were selected on the basis of academic fitness, general knowledge of
student affairs, and interest in the
Issues with which this- committee
would lie concerned.
The Committee on Sttliflmt Housing is a subcommittee, of » e Student Personnel Council, wtilcli is
the governing body of all student
life with the exception of academic
affairs.
f*i*ri$»i»'tm\9.1W5
•rwr
Eiropi Sttdy Group Moats
Wurzburg Session
In Wurzburg, the session will run
from June 27 to September 4, with a
cost of $951. This Includes roundtrip air transportation, tuition and
fees for the six week academic
course and six hours of credit at
Albany State, room and board with
Area Med Professor
To Lecture On
Vietnam Experiences
On Tuesday, February 23, Dr.
Antonio Boba, Associate Professor
of Anesthesia at Albany Medical
College, will speak on his experiences in Vietnam during October
and November of 1964.
This event is open to the public,
and will take place at the Schenectady Unitarian Church located at
1221 Wendell Avenue. Admission Is
free.
Dr. Boba was in Vietnam working
at the medical' school in Saigon as
a member of the Care-Medico Team.
Dr. Boba graduated from the University of Padua and from the University of Geneva, and has been
Assistant Resident in Ophthalmology
at the University of Parma and
Assistant Resident in Surgery at
Ellis Hospital in Schenectady and
at the Albany Medical Center Hospital.
The author of forty scientific
papers and three monographs, his
investigative work Is with hypotheimia hypotension, shock, and
intra-uterine life. .
Dr. Boba is able to speak a number of foreign languages fluently and
has traveled widely through the Middle East and Europe.
His present activities are divided
between teaching, clinical care of
patients, and laboratory work.
The letter, from a meat packing
company, which shall be designated
as "Company X," reads:
. "Company X" is a manufacturer
of artificial sausage casings and
other flexible film products used
in the meat Industry. As a major
supplier to this industry, we would
like to know if your Institution maintains a sausage kitchen and/or a
Nantes Program
In Nantes the program will run
from June 24 to August 28, with
a cost of $1110. An additional $340
will be added for the optional postsession tour. The cost for the basic
session includes . round-trip air
transportation, with a rate adjustment if an alternate return.route is
taken.
In addition to the academic s e s sion at Nantes, the participants will THE UNIVERSITY CENTER ASSOCIATION w i l l present the Princeton Nassons in an informal folkspend a week studying in Paris and
song program on Sunday, February 21, from 2-3:30 p.m. in Brubacher Lower Lounge. There will be no
will stay at Cite Universltalre.
Students will be housed in host charge for this program.
French families in Nantes. Several
weekend excursions Into the surrounding countryside will be included in the cost.
Five S.U.N.Y.A.Students
Attend
University Model U.N. Conference
Five students from Forum of
Politics and one faculty member
represented S.U.N.Y.A. at the Seventh Annual University Model United Nations held in Montreal, Canada February 10-14.
The conference consisted of sessions of the United Nations General
Assembly, Security Council and Economic and Social Council supplemented by speakers and films. It
was held at Montreal, McGill, and
Sir George Williams Universities.
The Albany delegation composed
of Ronnie Braunstein, Sandy Menegaux, Joe Stormer, Joe Silverman,
Helen Williams and Dr. William
Clarkin represented Yugoslavia.
Other schools that were present
Hollls Blodget, Director of Finan- were West Point, United States,
cial Aids, urges all students Inter- Royal Military College, Canada,
ested In the new work-study pro- Skldmqre College, Jordan, Colgate,
gram of the federal government,
to Inquire immediately at the Financial Aids Office.
Students Interested in obtaining
this part-time employment should
apply at the Financial Aids Office,
Draper 210. To qualify, students
must show financial need, usually
comparable to that required for the
maximum Scholar Incentive Award.
Financial
Aids
MOSENS
. " ^ ^
The "Washburn Review," Washburn. University, Topeka, Kan., tells
o( a letter received by its president,
Dr.. Harold Sponberg, which he decided to pass around.
a German family, arid four excursions to surrounding historic and
cultural sites.
Following the academic session a
two week field trip will be conducted
through several parts of Italy,
France, and the Rivera. The cost
of the field trip is an extra $250,
which includes all expenses.
' The study program at the University of Wurzburg Includes
courses in composition, conversation, language, literature, and history.
Nantes Offers Eight Credits
The study program at the University of Nantes Includes courses
in language, civilization and a seminar offering eight hours of graduate or undergraduate credit at Albany State.
The European Projects Office,
which is located in Dean William
Seymour's office, Draper 203, .has
announced that the project is willing to accept twenty-five students
for the Wurzburg program and thirty-five students for the Nantes program.
To this date, only twenty students
have applied for the summer study
program. The final date for filing
an application is February 26.
DEPARTMENT
STORE
141 CENTRAL AVENUE • BETWEEN ROBIN » LAKE AVE
Open Your Lambert's Charge Account
No interest or carrying charge
COURTESY
Uruguay, and the Hebren University ence. After the banquet, William
Humphrey, Director of the Human
of Jerusalem, Israel.
Rights Division of the United Nations,
discussed the problen.s CanDelegation Meets Yugoslav Official
In all there were fifty-five schools ada 'faces with the Quebec Separapresent with over three hundred tist movement.
students participating in the conferEpstein Speaks on Disarmament
ence.
Humphrey was one of two speakers
While registering for the conference, the delegation was greeted from the United Nations. William
by a representative from the Yugo- Epstein, Chief of Disarmament Afslav Embassy in Canada, who ori- fairs for the United Nations, spoke
ented them with his country's views on the recent steps towards disarmament and what are the fuiure
on foreign affairs.
Soon after their lirieflng they at- prospects for total disarmament.
The last night of the Conference
tended the first session of the General Assembly, where the first of was marked by another banquet
sponsored
by Montreal and a speech
seven resolutions to be presented
during the conference, was debated. by Ralph Enckell, Ambassador for
The following night the City of Finland, who discussed the work of
Montreal held a banquet in honor the United Nations and the future
of the schools attending the confer- of the organization.
'A good 'IS
the precious
life-blood of a
master spirit,
embalmed and
treasured up
on purpose to a
life beyond
life:1
211 Central Ave.
5 minute walk from the
New Campus
1148 Western Avenue
BOB and FRANK
PINE HILLS CLEANERS
340 Western Avenue
CLEANING end EXPERT
TAILORING
Re Call end Deliver
IV 2-1134
INSTANT SILENCE
For information write:
Academic Aids, Box 969
Berkeley, California 94701
Peon., HI 4-791S
This Card Entitles You To
20% Off On All Cash Sales
(Repairs Excluded)
fine Watch and Jewelry Repairing
Done on Premises
Saturday till 6
a description of the course curriculum and the number of students
taking it."
Dr. Sponberg sent the letter first
to Richard Vogel, School Treasurer,-with this comment In the
margin: "I know there is plenty
of bologna on this campus, but I
did not know they were doing surveys on it."
To which Mr. Vogel replied:
"This I believe is an academic
affair."
The letter was then forwarded
by President -Sponberg to Dr. A.
F. Englebert, Dean of the College,
with the comment: "This project
seems to be in your area—a continuous ring of bologna. Please e s tablish a course of study in this
meaty field."
The dean sent the letter back to
the president with this notation:
"If this refers to link sausage, we
could make it a divisional course. "THIS SPORTING L I F E " (tors Richard Harris and Rachel Roberts. Roberts was nominated for an Academy Award for this perGet the pun?"
formance. It is being shown tomorrow night by IFG in D349.
Dr. Sponberg then forwarded the
letter to Dean John Howe, head of
the law school with the question:
"Would the sausage course fit your
curriculum, since you are training
pork-barrel specialists?"
'Requiem for a Heavyweight' Opens
IFG Double Feature for Weekend
To which the law school dean
responded: "Would the course in
sausage stuffing count as a physical education substitute?"
And, at this point, the matter of
beginning a sausage-stuffing course
at WU was dropped, probably not
to any great dismay to either students or administration.
Quinn, who has not been told,
This weekend IFG will present
two fine films in Draper 349. Shows shocks them all by taking a beating
will be at 7 p.m. and 9:15 p.m. and for well over four rounds. In the
course of the fight Quinn almost
the admission will be 35C.
loses his left eye and he is told he
The first of these films, "Requiem cannot fight again.
for a Heavyweight," which will be
"This Sporting Life," a British
shown tonight, was directed by David
Merrick and stars Anthony Quinn, film, will be shown Saturday. The
film
concerns a sensational young
Jackie Gleason, Mickey Rooney,and
rugby player whose talent is second
Julie Harris.
only to his ego. Unmindful of others,
Quinn gives a moving portrayal he sets out to attain everything he
wants, including his landlady.
of
an
honest,
if
slow-witted
fighter.
Deutsche Verein
The Deutsche Verein voted on Gleason plays his manager, who inFor his portrayal of the arrogant
and passed its Constitution last tentionally overmatches him and sportsman, Richard Harris was
Thursday. Membership dues are tells the syndicate he will not last nominated for an academy award.
being accepted by Justine Turner. four rounds.
Folkdancing will be held the 2nd
INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ID CARD
and 4th Thursday of every month.
for discounts in USA
Following the business meeting,
and 28 countries
Dr. Kilchenmann showed slides of
Germany and Switzerland.
STUDENT SHIPS
Hillel
to Europe
On Sunday, February 21, at 7:30
CHARTER FLIGHTS
p.m. in Brubacher Private Dining
within Europe
Room, Cantor Dwprkin will preWrite: Dept. CP
sent an interpretation of Jewish
U. S. National Student Association
music. Refreshments will follow.
265 Madison Ave., New York, N.Y. 10016
WIN
NOTICES |
The
free trip home
for Spring
UNIVERSITY RING'
Vacation —
listen to WSUA
Channel 64,
EXCELSIOR HOUSE
On Scenic Snyder's
Lake
"Tops with Rack & Roll Bands
and Good Food"
Now
Featuring
Till;
SUNDOWNERS
Nightly Wednesday-Saturday
Jam Session Sunday 3—?
Dial 283-9915
Fruoj of Age
Required
5R0F
•
,
Open eoeningt till 9
Sorority Rushing will begin tonight at the Coker to be held at
8 p.m. in Bru Lower Lounge. Attendance is compulsory for all girls
interested in Rushing, provided that
they have 2.0 averages.
The girls will meet representatives from the eight sororities on
campus. A skit will be presented
Phi Beta Lambda
from 9-10 p.m.
At a recent business meeting,
Literature concerning Rushing
replacement elections for fresh- will be distributed, and the Rush
men offices were held. The newly Captains will be introduced.
elected Historian is Lois Busher
Registration for Rush will begin
and Co-Corresponding Secretary is on Saturday, February 20, and will
Veda Wemett.
last until Friday, February 26. All
girls must register in order to Rush.
Phi Delta
A one-dollar fee will be charged
The sisters of Phi Delta announce to cover the costs. Registration will
that the beer party held on Feb- take place on Saturday from 12noon
ruay 6 was a success, An Open until 2 p.m. and on Sunday from
House for State's men will be held 5 to 7 p.m. in Brubacher at the
on Sunday, February 21.
Student Activities Office.
From Monday through Friday regSigma Phi Sigma
istration will take place in the
The sisters of Sigma Phi Sigma Peristyles in lower Draper from
announce that they held a beer 11:15 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.
party at Kapps' in the Hollows on
February 12.
collegiate haircuts
Jeweler*
be explained. It is also Important
as it gives the rushee a chance to
become acquainted with all the Fraternities.
If a rushee finds it impossible
to attend the "Smoker," he should
contact Chip Sullivan at 457-7714
or John Hynes at 457-7713, or he
may go in person to Mr. McKinnon's office in Bru to ascertain the
details of rush registration and
bidding.
Alpha Pi Alpha
John Shlpherd, President, announces that the fraternity has held
a buffet supper and card with both
fraternity and non-fraternity faculty
members on Tuesday, February 16.
We feature
Albany, N.w York
INK HIRE
\JhmU JkuuL\
SNAPPY BARBER SHOP
JOHN MILTON
SION I N
Fraternities and sororities will
commence their spring rush periods
with parties to be held tonight. The
Inter-Fraternity will begin its rushing with an off campus "Smoker"
to be held at the Polish Community
Center at 288 Sheridan Ave.
The "Smoker" is essential to all
those who plan to rush as the rushing rules and the procedures for
rush registration and bidding will
Gamma Kappa Phi
Ruth Slegel, president of Gamma Kappa Phi, announces that the
sisters will hold an Informal party
tomorrow at the Center Inn.
^^H^K^K^X^K^K^
course on the processing of sausage.
"Company X's Interest ts to be
of assistance by placing this' department on our ..mailing lists and
having our local representative keep
in contact for whatever help we can
be to the college.
"If you have such a course, we
would like to know the names of
the supervisor in charge and the
equipment. Since students graduating from such courses might be
considered for employment by our
firm, we would also like to receive
Fraternities, Sororities
Commence Rushing Tonight
CARD
*p. $, Jtlmtvit.
ALtAWY STUDENT MESS
Washburn University Refuses Off er
To Give Sausage Processing Course
Today To Discuss Program
Tht European Study Proframwlll
- hold »' meeting tor til interested
students today »t 1:30 p.m., in
Draper 349. This program offers
qualified students an opportunity to
study, at the University of Nantes
and the University of Wurzburg this
summer.
Dr. Carl J. Odenkirchen, who has
just returned from France, where he
made the final arrangements for this
summer study program, will be the
principle speaker at the meeting. He
will explain the operations of the
European Study Program and show
slides from his recent trip.
ftlnay. Febhwry 1». IMS
Order at the State University Booktton Office at tht Cheek Cashing Counter
Rings are 10 Karat Gels) In three settings:
Stsoll - for wesson
Large and Extra Heavy - far awn
Orders will be taken far the dosses of I N S and 19M ONLY
Prices are $27.00 aawll
$32.30 Urge
$38.00 extra heavy
plus 10% Federal Eaelsa Tax
A deposit of at least $5.00 is required en ell order*
Delivery takes abet* a - 4 weeks
Plastic backs ere available on the awn's extra heavy only at $2.00
Stones are available tn double facet er buff - Amethyst. Ruby, Saaahire
COME IN NOW AND ORDER YOUR RING
State University Bookstore
STATE UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
Draper Hall
135 Western Ave.
Ext. 129
Albany, N. Y.
COB ALL VOUO Ng t t *
Draper Hall
135 Western Ave.
Ex 129
Albany, KY.
>rldoy, February j » , WU-j
ALBANY STUOINT
W i «
Reoeot N e w From Bogota
Poverty Marks Life of S.U.N.Y.A.'s Foster Child
Ctyciitr
'WE
Well don't worry.Zeus..
If there is but one
mortal remaining who
believes in you, I
shall be that
It's too bod the linos will bt twico as long ond the ticket supply half as large on the New Campus.
Gruciela Garcia, SUNYA's "adopted" ten-
duction of the University Theatre, or .
reads this paper on Tuesdays and F r i days has a stake in student government.
GRACIELA GRINDS CORN a* port of her household chore* while her younger brother Guillermo
helps her.
Senate is also the means through which
students are chosen to serve on facultystudent committees which help determine
University policies in many areas affecting student life. If there is dissatisfaction with these policies, or with the student representatives in the committees,
Senate is the place to take the complaint.
of pictures displaying an " a v e r a g e " day in
the life; of the bright-eyed little girl from
DINNER IS SERVED TO Gracielo's father, Guillermo, and Graciela in the crowded confines of
their kitchen.
"Gracie," as her name has been Anglicized,
lives in a slum section of Bogota, and she,
along with a sister and four brothers, dwells
in a tiny, run-down home with her mother and
father. Her father is a carpenter by trade,
It is true that "Senate is at fault in
not carrying out its obligations. But the
fact remains that a government is only
as good as the people it represents want
it to be
and made the few pieces of furniture which
can be suen in the picture.
Graciu has been SUNYA's foster child since
December, 1963. Through the Foster Parents
plan, she receives food, clothing, and medical
Instead, it, was thought that Page Hall
would be adequate to handle the expected
crowds.
When Peter, Paul and Mary arrived in
this area last year they performed in the
Armory to a huge crowd. Their following
in folk music is certainly no greater than
is Seeger's. For Homecoming, the Armory was again rented to present two
lesser-known Folk names. Then, when
the University is given a chance to hear
a truly outstanding Folk artist, enjoyment is severely limited to the chosen
900, and they are rustled into lines and
crowded into Page on'the night of the
performance.
SUNDAY, FEBRUAY 21
year-old daughter, is shown here in a series
Bogota, Columbia.
Lines Result From Poorto reserve
Planning
the Armory for this event.
Several days ago the line phenomena
appeared in the Peristyles again. P e r iodically, whenever a really fine performing artist is scheduled to arrive
on campus, the Peristyles are crammed
full of hopefuls waiting hours to obtain
a ticket.
Such was the case for two days earlier
this week. Pete Seeger, one of Folk
Music's " g r e a t s " will be presenting a
concert in Page Hall next weekend. The
outcome of the ticket sales device for
this performance was staggering lines,
at times running to a width of four people
and stretching far and away down the
Peristyles to the neighborhood of the
Bookstore.
We can only question Music Council,
who is sponsoring the concert about the
logic employed in selecting Page Hall
to be the scene of Mr. Seeger's performance.
When the University Calendar was
planned last Spring, it was early enough
care lor both herself and h e r family. Because
of this, she has been able to attend school for
the past year, and does quite well.
In spite of the help they receive, however,
the family is still a long way from having
evorylliing they need. The continued support
GRACIELA AND HER BROTHER Guillermo approach the front door of their home as they return
from the store.
of SI'NYA through the next year will do a
great deal to relieve their burden of poverty.
CARLOS, ONE OF Gracielo's brothers, helps
his father at his wood-working trade.
COMMUNICATIONS
the Viet Cong as the "From of
Reader Claims ASP
Liberation," but nisieadliiieipren.il
the
phrase as the "force of liberaThe conditions of this concert are Misquotes Forum Speaker
tion," a well-known "Comniuiiisi
beyond hope, but, in the future, better To tho E d i t o r s :
propaganda line."
All article appealing In your Isplanning and a fuller realization of
Philip Lord, J.
sue
of
February
12,
regarding
tlie
student tastes should be employed in appearance on campus of Dr. Vo- Student Calls Misprint
choosing the location for artists' per- Tlianli-Mlnh, Vietnamese scholar,
quoted Dr. Vo as saying, "The Viet Matter of Indifference
formances.
Albany Student Press
Don't thank me...
I simply want
the Last Believer's
bargaining power.
WSUA Special Program
Government
Depends OnPeteSupport
We have been appalled by the total
Seeger next weekend, attends a prolack of interest on the part of the student body toward its government. We
can only guess that it is the result of
a complete unawareness of the importance of this government.
It cannot be denied that this year's
Senate has flagrantly violated the r e sponsibility with which it was entrusted.
It has been a farce of representative
government — indeed of government at
all, but this does not exonerate the individual student from concerning himself with the government.
Regardless of how incompetent Senate
has been, it remains the body under which
all, student organizations and services on
this campus operate. Anyone who sees
Thank
Com; 'force of liberation' Is gaining
more and more support from the
people."
This Is a direct misquote, possibly arising from the difficulty
Willi which Dr. Vo was understood.
What Dr. Vo did say Is quite different from what appears In the
article to he merely a "propaganda
lino" supporting the Viet Cong as
Ihe "liberators" of South Vietnam,
In fad what was stated and i e omphaslxed many times that evening
was lhat the term "Viet Cong" Is
a slang word, similar lo"Cominle,"
used by the Saigon Government to
signify the "National Liberation
Front," which Dr. Vo continually
referred to as the "Front of Liberation." The NLF IK a South Vietnamese p o l i t i c a l organization
headed by a iioii-Cominunlsl lawyer
and made up largely of neutralists
with a small, but perhaps significant Communist constituency,
T o the E d i t o r s :
Neither
malice nor ils-isn ln-rl
amusement prompts me lo call i"
your attention the inverted pi."inESTABLISHED MAY 1916
graphic reproduction of Henri liusiibury's etching which adorned Hie
BY THE CLASS OF 1918
Arts page of today's ASP.
The unpercepUve roadei , I'm
The Albany Sludonl Press is a semi-weekly newspaper published by tlie studenl body of ihe Slate University of New York at
afrahl, will be given Ihe linpri",Albany. The ASP may bo reac hod by dialing either 489-6481 or IV 2-3326. The ASP olfico, I ocated in Roam 5 of Brubar-hor
sloiithat Itushbtiry was a IIIIIBII'I'MIII
H a l l , 750 Stale Street, is open from 7 - 1 I p.m. Sunday through Thursday nights.
century prociirror of model n .d
E D I T H S. HARDY - K A R E N E. K E E P E R
straci art.
Co-Fdltors-ln-Chiol
The mistake was, I realize. :l
RAYMOND A. MC C L O A T
DEBORAH I. FRIEDMAN
h A R O L D L. L Y N N E
technical one and was beyond ,.<ui
Sports Editor
Managing Editor
Fealure Editor
editorial control. A similar gaffe,
JOSEPH S. SILVERMAN
WILLIAM H. COLGAN
EARL C. SCHREIBER
however, was an editorial one.
News Editor
Lxecutlve Editor
Arts Editor
I refer to the December i npii'in
E I L E E N L. MANNING
C Y N T H I A A. GOODMAN
DOUGLASG.UPHAM
Identifying
Stanley Wyait's" William
Associate
Editor
Associate
Feature
Editor
Photography Editor
Blake"
as "Thoreau." The literal •
J
U
D
I
T
H
M.
CONGER
DIANA
M.
MAREK
KLAUS SCHNITZER
Technical Supervisor
connection between Hie two is unBusiness Manage!
Associate Photography Editor
deniable. The physical sliiiilainle-.
SUSAN J , THOMSON
JOHN M. H U N T E R
MOKICA M. MC O A U G H E Y
Public Relations Dlroctor
Consultant Advertising Manager
Advertising Manager
did not exist.
Desk Editor
,
•;• i
•
Ellen Zong
These are, you will say, ihe InStaff
Joseph Mahay, James Bollln. Mike Farenall, Linda rreehon, Linda Handel.man, Mike Gjlmorllnt
evitable mistakes that every newsKevin Magin, Carol Wglllng, Alice Nudelmun. Betty Newman, Brenda Miller
paper makes, I retort that Ibey are
Columnists
M, Gilbert Williams, Pool Jensen, Bfuco D a n i e l . , J . Rooer Loe, Gary Lucius
It is unfortunate that tlie reporter misinformations of Hie public which,
Photographer.
,..
Waller Post,'Steven King, Robert McOdare
Cartoonist
•
»•<
•
*
i
"
'
•
•
•••• William Slnnhold was so unfamiliar Willi the political either from ignorance or from inSTUDENT TEACHING con be fun, but the (list octuol controntaAll communlcolion. must bo addressed lo the Editors ond must be signed. Nome, will be withheld upon request. Communi- facts of South Vietnam that ho mis- difference, you did nol caret"flghi.
cations should be limited to 300 word, ond are subject lo editing, The Albany Sludonl Press assumes no responsibility lor understood Dr. Vo's statement awl I trust your reason Is llie forinei • tlon with the cloit can prove to be a traumatic experience (or the
opinion, expressed in I t . column, or communlcolion., a . such expressions do not necessarily reflect Its views.
-I
Roborl C. Polorsun neophyte.
'did not recognize his reference to
1 - 2 p.m. - "The World of American Folk Music"
Host - Gerry Terdiman
2 - 4 p.m. - "Music of the Masters" - Part I
Rachmaninoff Concerto for Piano and
Orchestra #1; Eugene Ormandy conducting, Sergei Rachmaninoff soloist.
Host - Richard Bartyzel
4 - 6 p.m. - "Music of the Masters" - Part II
Host - Arthur Loder
6 - 7 p.m. - "The World of International Folk Music"
Host - Israel Hirsch
7-7:30 p.m. - "Serendipity" " I t ' s Laughable"
7:30-8 p.m. - "The American Forum"
Guest - Mr, Robert L. Tenney of the
American Friend's Association
Host - J. Roger Lee
8 - 9 p.m. - "Comment" ... a feature of the WSUA
Radio News Department which will p r e sent an analysis of the major news
events of the week. The "Guest of the
Week" will be Art Johnston. Covering
world news of importance will be commentators Bill Doyle, Bruce Ferm, and
John Kienzle, "Comment" will be produced and directed by Bob Fullem and
John Haluska.
9 -11 p.m. - "WSUA Showtime" - "The Sound of
Music" - Host - Edward Schwartz
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 24
7:05-9:30 p.m. - "Jazz Scene WSUA"-Host-LouStrong
Student Teachers Relate Experiences
Of Their Harrowing Eight-Week Test
ay C y n t h i a Goodman
One fateful clay in his
Senior year, a State student
will stand awkwardly In
front of a brick structure
and wish fervently that it
weren't too late to change;
his course.
of doubt mixed with confidence.
Armed only with Ihe relatively
"safe experiences" of Education
and Methods courses, Ihe unsuspecting college senior must be ready
to meet all the problems thai normal,
diabolical adolescents can devise.
Aided only by the cooperating
teacher, the student.must rely on
Intuition, psychology, and half-forgotten lessons to guide Ihe students
diiiriisind to his care,
The nervous yoiuig man will
fumble with his books for a low
minutes and then self-consciously
Tho Limitations
make his way up the stairs Into the
However, the " c a r e " Is not comschool, In a few minutes he will plete, and many sludonl teachers
enter Ihe room thai lor eight weeks feel the limitations of their experwill lie the slto of unremitting lor- ience and tend lo describe It as
ture or exciting challenge.
"substituting"
lor the regular
Each semester quarter, a group lonelier.
of uludonls from the Stule UniverGeuerally regarded as a colleague
sity CoUego of Education leave their by the other faculty, and respected
regular college routine to student as an Instructor by his students, bo
teach either In Milne or In an off- must nevertheless tie bis work In
cuinpiis Junior or senior high school, wllb that of the cooperating teacher
A few students enlor Ibis phase of and follow the patterns that ho or she
iiiuir education wllb the comforting has already set,
hope that tboy might Just disappear
Of course, ihe biggest problem
the eve of their first class day and iiilllel!/ Is establishing sufficient
never have to face the rows of rapport wlih the class, On one hand,
teen-agers Jusl waning lo crush ihe .'.indents may be bright and vocal
their teaching aspirations.
high school Juniors preparing for
A lew others embark on their college and eager to provide ansstudent touching experience with wers.
the bold determination to "Show
On the other hand, they might lie a
thniii wlni's boss," but the great bored and somewhat hostile group
majority feel only a normal twinge of 19 year-olds Impatiently biding
their time until Hie State releases
them from bondage.
An Applo a Day
Despite the dimension of tlie challenge, most student teachers r e turning lo campus are reminiscent
and satisfied. They speak more
readily of the happy moments Ihan
the problems. One young man could
laughingly recall his "courtship"
with an 11-yoar old girl who carefully established his bachelor status
and then preceded to place a bright
rod apple on his desk each morning.
A graduating Math major could
siHI see the scrawled farewell note
that ended with "From (he lovable
boys In Hie back row."
The semester's quota of student
teachers is divided Into groups according to course, Each group Is
presided over by a supervising
loachor who periodically drops In
on Ihe students In Hie class room,
Itequlred by law to hold three
seminars during the teaching assignment, tlie supervisor assists the
teachers in preparing for permanent
certification,
The Antlclimu*
For most of tlie seniors and 2nd
semester Juniors at State, student
teaching Is a prospect both frightening and exciting. For tlie students
who have already returned, It's Just
a little bard to sit on the other side
of the teacher's desk....
Ptl^ty/Frtriairy j», IMS"
ALlAHTtTWOTTPtlM
BHBLL
HootMNimy Revival Has Long, Varied Trodffions
Tea rooin or expresw
bouse, basement, or ballroom, backyard or baseball field - it doesn't make
a boot of difference where
you bold a hootennanyl
Americans of all ages from every
walk of Ilia are gathering In informal groups to sing folk songs. The
songs they sing are not new, but
the enthusiasm has been rekindled.
The dramatic increase In interest In folk songs and hootenannies
during the last two decades is reported to be more of an effect than
a causa.
thirties and probably had very little
contact with folk songs. An oc. colonel chorus of "Clementine" or
"She'll be Comin' Round the Mountain" was the extent of their experience.
Today folk music Is back - a n d
it's bigger than ever. On radio and
television, on single records and
long-playing albums, In personal
appearances on college campuses,
In big city auditoriums and small
lodge halls groups of singers are
entertaining audiences with hootenannies.
Instrument Demand ,
Sears, Roebuck and Co.', who has
been selling guitars, banjos, and
mandolins in its catalogs since 1894,
I Cultural Rebirth
In the years since the end of reports that the demand for these
World War ,11, our nation has been folk-singing Instruments Is greater
experiencing a dramatic rebirth of than ever.
Interest in American culture and
And the sweeping Influence of this
heritage. And one of the more pop- form of entertainment eastward is
ular directions this movement has Illustrated by the fact that one of
taken is the resurrection of folk- the best selling items In the comsinging.
pany's newest Connecticut retail
The parents of today's teenagers store Is a folk-singing guitar I
At the present time, there are
grew up during the twenties and
types contain' four, six, and twelve
strings, respectively.
The twelve, string guitar la still
used by some professionals, but the
six string or "Classic" guitar Is by
far the most popular, t h e four string
guitar Is the easiest to play; and i s
often preferred by amateurs.
It is possible to pay several hundred dollars for a guitar, but models
are available in tlie twenty to fifty
dollar range that will produce a soft,
rich tone.
The banjo, on the other hand, Is
considered to be a development of
Foreign Traditions
The Anglo-Saxon tradition was the Negroes of this country and has
imported from Great Britain and been called "America's only nanorthern Europe, and was responsi- tional Instrument."
ble for most of our ballads and lyric
folk songs.
Later, the African tradition was
added. This group is credited with
the blues, the work songs, and the
ever-popular minstrel tunes.
To all of these songs was added
the only truly American contribution to folk-singing - the choral
refrain.
Thousands of professionals are
now making a good income in a
field that could hardly support a
handful of " p r o s " thirty years ago.
More Important than the professional aspect, there are now
hundreds of thousands of non-professional banjo players, guitar playe r s , and singers who have found
these traditional songs a means of
self-expression in today's world.
Even a beginner can be plunking
out accompanying chords on a banjo
or guitar In a matter of minutes.
While It takes time to learn to play
these instruments well, a few chords
can be' played after the first lesson.
And there are more than 1,000
folk songs from which to choose
your selections.
only four manufacturers In the United States producing banjos. This
Instrument has become so popular
during the past twelve months that
the banjo-makers have been unable
to meet the demand. According to
Sears, banjo and guitar sales Increased ninety to one hundred percent In 1983k
Folk singing Is, of course, not
new. While It is now considered an
American art, It had two main
streams of origin.
. .
. ....
While stringed Instruments go
A MODERN PIONEER in the folic singing resurgence is Mike back in history- almost as far as
Settle. He has appeared before many college audiences, including the drum, thegultarweknowevolved
one at State earlier this year.
In Western Europe. The three main
'Late Guy' Wins k
Vote from Writer
(ACP)—Mike Palmer, columnist
for "UH Callboard," University of
Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut,
wants it known that not always being
on time Is a virtue, not a vice.
Here's his experienced reasoning:
If a person Is always punctual, or
early, he obviously must have some
time on his hands In order to make
sure that he is on time.
Banjos usually have five strings
and are also sold In a wide price
range. The Sears catalog of 1894
listed banjos for as low as St.78,
but today prices range from thirty
dollars to seventy dollars for a
good instrument.
Fad or Pact?
Is today's interest in folk singing
and planned or Impromptu hootenannies Just a passing fad or Is it a
rebirth of a cultural interest In
pioneer music? The experts believe
that since it took almost twenty years
to get here, it's going to be with us
for a good, long time.
MORE THAN 100 YEARS OLD, this banjo probably played pn important part in some of the early folk-tests recounting battles of
the Civil War. The original owner inset daguerreotypes of himself
In the neck to personalise the Instrument.
ftUn.r^xmv
w. ms
ALBANY 1TUDINT PEJUS
Mole Nude Poses Problem in Art
Ethan Frome, to be presented in Richardson Studio
Theatre on February 26, 27 and March 1-6, is a
dramatization of the famous novel by Edith Wharton.
Under the most able direction of Dr. Paul Bruce Pettit.
certainly sculptors have been forced ™? work has gained new depth and insight. His is, as
by the limitation of their medium to Dr. Pettit stated,", an attempt to approach Ethan Frome
portray the male'figure more consistently than have painters or print- from the epic theatre point of "view."
Such a view s t r e s s e s the people, landscape, and enmakers who can veer from the male
subject and paint towns, stlll-lifes, vironment of the New England setting. This is done
portraits, and other subject includwith the aid of one hundred projections shown before
ing tlie nude female.
Today though, artistic prudery and during the show. Such an approach as this takes
cannot exist. Just as there exists e beyond the confines of the stage to the New England
no unpoetic word, so there exists
. ' -'
no unartistlc subject. What perhaps countryside.
Not Complete Attention
No artist seems to have forgotten the subject, but few artists
have given tlie completely nude male
figure a great amount of attention,
The' depiction of the nude female
has become passe In the art world.
Certainly It Is still of some interest, and well It should be, but fhe
portraying of the completely nude
male in art lias been limited.
We are accustomed to seeing the
female nude portrayed In art. Such
realistic executions of the female
form as those of the Belgian a r tists Paul Delvaux and Rene Magritte fail to cause as much a stir
as does the representation of the
male genitals In modern art.
It is for this reason, primarily,
that artists even of our liberal age
of Genet and Rechy novels fail to
execute many works containing the
male nude.
Extensive in Greek Art
Throughout the history of art the
nude male figure lias not been a
subject for the majority of artists.
The use of the male nude was extensive In ancient Greek art. The
Greek vases, the sculpted Kourol,
and' sucli classical sculptures as
"Poseidon," bear witness to the
Greek interest in the subject of
the male nude.
Sculpture declined in Roman art
when the male genitals were given
fig leaves. The fully nude male form
did not emerge until the Renaissance, The closest to the male nude
executed during the Middle Ages
was the depiction of Christ on the
Cross, where somehow a bare chest
does occasionally appear.
As the Renaissance developed in
Italy, not only were male nudes
represented in many works but they
lacked the fig leaf motif given them
by the Romans.
In many Instances such as Pollaluolo engraving "Battle of Ten
Naked Men" and the works of
Michelangelo. Including Ills Slstlne
ZEUS
may be hard to accept is how the
figure is used.
In a recent work of artist Greg
Curnoe which was reproduced in
a recent "Art International" we see
a depiction of a simplified phallus
descending upon a reclining female.
Though this work is contemporary
to our age, it is not unprecedented.
Da Vinci did some highly Interesting anatomical drawings of coitus
In notebooks. Curnoe's paintings
may be highly provocative, but he
handles his two subjects witli the
direct and simplistic honestly appropriate to modern expression.
Another modern artist, Kendall
Shaw, has depicted the total male
nude in silhouette llfeslze.
Writers and Artists
Certainly writers have been given
extensive freedom witli words. It Is
only right that the artist, too, have
tlie freedom he has to a great extent
been unwilling and unable to use
completely for graphic expression.
It is time the depiction of the total
nude figure came off the walls of
the lavatories of America and onto
the canvases and drawing papers of
American artists. It is a brave and
bold freedom which any artist has
the choice of using.
good godl
Chapel paintings and the sculptures
"David" and "The Dying Slave"
realistic nudes were depicted.
Hide and Seek
Yet the genitals still managed to
play a hide-and-seek-game in such
works as "The Expulsion from
Paradise" of Masaccio, and the
more Medieval works of the Northern Renaissance such as the Adam
panel of the Ghent altarpiece by
Jan and Hubert Van Eyck, and the
Durer print "Adam and Eve."
In the interim between the Renaissance and the present time, the
totally male nude has, of course,
been depicted. We see this In the
works of tlie sculptor Auguste Rodin,
the American painter Thomas Eaklns, the early works of Rockwell
Kent, tlie lanky sculptures of WUheim Lelimbruck, the devised-wire
works of Alexander Calder, and the
ARTS in t h e R o u n d
Gerald's Drug Co.
Impala Super Sport
Coupe
by Jim Schreier
seats, center console and carpeting; the smooth and
easy Chevrolet ride j and Chevrolet power, starting with
our famous 140-hp Turbo-Thrift 230 Six. This '65
Chevrolet's a home improvement if you ever saw one.
The Italian version of the Cinderella story lost little when Rossini
decided it would pass as an opera.
Gone are the rats, mice and pumpkin (replaced Instead by a chorus),
and inserted as a .scene in Prince
Charming's wine cellars.
Our Cinderella is Guillietta Slmlonato, a soprano of varying capabilities, backed by Paolo Moularsolo, Ugo Berelll and conductor
Ollviero de Fabrltlls. Since you are
lamlllar with the Doublemlnt commercial, you know well one of the
opera's melodic highlights.
'Home of Distinctiw Jewelry and Gifts'
Must have, br presently taking
Driver Ed 21
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CHEVELLE Looks, luxury and lots more
The lookn you can see. The luxury that's a Mulibu
Super Sport you can imagine: bucket Heals, full
Mulibu Super Spurt Caupe
carpeting, patterned vinyls and eight interior color
schemes. The rest you'd better sample for yourself.
Cm AIR Everything's
new but the idea
438-0853
The idea still is, make Corvair
the sportiest low-priced car
this side of the Atlantic. So
look: suave now continental
styling, even better handling,
sumo rear-engined traction.
Driving's fun. Try it.
ROY'S
IDEAL FOODS
143 Western Ave.
Assorted
Sandwiches
Shop at Roy's
by Larry Epstein
Italian Cinderella
STUYVESANT JEWELERS
In your spare tints
after classes
Drive something
really new-discover
the difference at your Chevrolet
dealer's
Chevrolet • CheveUe • Chevy II > Corvair- Corvette
sights into both.
Columbia's recording of Boris
is a satisfactory one. Tlie superior
Chorus plus a brilliant George London offsets noisy surfaces and dull
stereo. Still tills Bolshoi Theater
production must attract attention for
authenticity in most detail, including a clarification of Mussorgsky's
intentions.
star stereo production of "Hodelinda": Stlch-Kandall, Maureen
Forrester, Helen Watts, Alexander
Young, Hoessl-Majdan and John
Boyden.
The typical static 18th Century
plot receives no relief from Handel's music. Actually, the whole
opera is a letdown from so man)
of Handel's similar oratories.
Brian Prlestman leads the Vienna •
itadio Orchestra in unknown music
that deserves to remain so. And no
performance can rise above such
a limitation.
Anti-hero and the Modern Novel
THE MILT CAVENDISH TRIO will provide the on-slogo accompaniment
for the University Theatre production of Ethan Fromo, tonight through
March 6. Tickets aro by student tax and aro available now In R279.
DRIVING INSTRUCTOR
Apply
Brechtian Devices
The simple plot becomes a much larger — almost
historical — statement under Dr. Pettit's direction.
He has disregarded the realistic and made full use of
theatrical devices and the stage to convey Ethan's story
in an internalized presentation of a man's life and
thoughts. In so doing, Dr. Pettit has utilized many
Brechtian devices and techniques of the theatre. The
sled scene has a " n e u t r a l " setting. Hence, attention
is directed to the mind of the character. Abstract
projections during the scene further emphasize the
complex processes of Ethan's mind.
The year 1964 presented numerous operas, especially stereo r a r ities.
Take, for example, the first
"adult" opera (two bedroom scenes
In the first act), "L'lncoronazlonedl
Poppea" by Monteverdi. Angel managed to slice the work In all possible
Limitations of Handel
places to get It on two records, but
Handel wrote scores of operas
300 year-old Monteverdi loses none
but
until
now no complete Handel
of his vigor here.
Characterization takes hold be- opera was available. Westminster
cause of a welding of two elements: settles this problem witli an allOriginality in presentation and competent singers. Monteverdi has yet
to reach full height In his current
renaissance,
CHEVROLET Redecorate your driveway
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Phone 6-3610
ABC Auto Driving School
185 N. Allen St.
(bet. Wash., 8, Cent. Ave.)
Suicide
Dr. Pettit does not, however, neglect the plot of
the story being presented. The play opens when Ethan,
a young man, is patiently enduring life with an embittered wife, Zeena. His existence is lonely and desolate.
When Mattie, the maidhiredby Zeena, enters the Frome
household, complications arise. Although Ethan is now
an older man caring for a miserable crippled wife, he
cannot deny the love which has grown for the servant.
The only end to such a situation seems to be suicide, and,
sharing a sled, they plunge head first down the side of
a mountain.
1964 Recordings Revive Many Operas
Cindy, Bedrooms, Boris Featured
discover the difference *
in the
Park out front, at least for a while, and let the neighbors enjoy that sleek Impala Super Sport styling,
After all, you have everything else to yourself: the
luxurious Super Sport interior with its cushy bucket
by Anne Dignoy
oils of Egon Schlele.
by M. Gilbert Williams
If a person has extra time, and
uses it only to get somewhere punctually, lie must be wasting some
time whereas the person who Is
habitually late must have things to
do or he wouldn't be late In the
first place.
If the person has things to do
that take up all his time, he obviously can't be accused of wasting
time.
Pee./
A R T S o n Act
BuJova
Wallace
International Sterling
Large Assortment ol Pierced Earrings
Diamonds Set While-U-Wait
Watch and Jewelry Repair
Headquarters for Colloge Jewelry
Strauss Centennial
Student Charge Account Aiwilable
Stuuuetant Plazo
IV 9-0549
THE ELITE MEET
HEAR MUSIC WITH A BEAT
GOOD FOOD, TOO
THE SNACK BAR AT BRU.
Tlie second Deutsche Grainiuophone offering for the itichard
Strauss Centennial Is "Die Frau
ohno Shatleu" us recorded live at
the Munich National Theater. This
opera, with fantastic staging complexities unfolds symbolically.
The theme Is human fertility.
All interpretation must lie personal.
Cr.e cannot help being aware, however, of witnessing the Strauss and
von liofliiuinsthul uperatic achievement,
Social Studies
llorls Goduiiov is the only successful social and psychological
study in romantic music, It Is a
rure example of when two diverse
elements such us social science and
art can combine to give fertile In-
neighbor who makes him leel
ashamed of his religion and whom,
One of tlie genres that lias evolved he believes, has violated Ills
from the philosophy of Existential- (Stern's) wife.
ism Is the novel in which tlie proWhy?
tagonist is an anti-hero. An antihero is an Individual who does not
Why is tile anti-hero genre so
conform to tlie reader's precon- popular? These novels express r e ceived notions as to what a hero pressed longings of the people who
should lie.
read them. The anti-hero dares to
A hero, at least popularly, should assert himself, to take the clamp
be virtuous, maintain a healthy, if off Ills id.
not overabundant relationship with
Existentialism says that it Is up
tlie opposite sex, and, most of all, to the individual to mold his own
be someone witli whom It is worth- existence from the shattered pieces
while for the reader to .identify. he finds around him. Many people
Tlie anti-hero, by contrast, Is ran- can't stretch their character into
corous, rude, and disturbed, lie is the pattern that, according to the
out of step witli (lie world.
Existentialists, they must, because
they are held bock by certain rules
Tho Ginger Man
of society, such as the personality
For example, Sebastian Danger- that family and friends have already
field, in J. P. Donlenvy's Joycean assigned them. The anti-hero novel
novel "The Ginger Man," Is a jolly lets them lie what they feel they
fellow caught up In a world witli ought to,
which he can't cope. Ills numerous
Solid philosophical impact Is anshortcomings Include a contempt other reason for tlie popularity of
for Hie feelings of Ids wife, his litis genre. The anti-hero novel
affinity for liquor, Ills evasion of appeals to those members of sodebts, and his general adversity, ciety, sucli as tlie adolescent, who
as exemplified by his unwllllngess are seeking metaphysical truths,
to study for his upcoming law ex- searching for a meaning in life.
amination.
Tills search Is a dominant theme •
Another contemporary example In anti-hero novels.
of an antl-hereo is Stern in the
The anti-hero genre will continue
novel of the same name by Bruce to exist only as long as tlie preJay Friedman. Stern Is on tile out- dominant intellectual mood Is exside of the world looking in, Little istential. Then It will join Its an111 life is meaningful to him. Ills cestors in the annals of literary
main source of frustration is a history.
r*4»y.FtWiNB-r
Mr
IMP
Cagers Nip Pittsburgh
face Buffalo Tomorrow
Eitirs 4th Ink
As of February 15, tlie
leaders in the AMIA basketball leagues were: EEP
In I, APA in n , KB in HI,
and the Cointnuters in IV.
Hire are the team and individual
leaders In each laagua:
LEAUUE I
1. Pottar Club
2. Kappa Bet*
8. Harriers
4. Goobers
5. APA
6. V1P»S
7. Walerbury
Kappa Beta
Sutherland
Goobers .
Firestone
Harriers
Zacnarlus
Goobers
HlckejL
Harriers
Bacon
LEAGUE II
1. APA
2. Kappa Beta
3. Infinites
4. SLS
5. TXO
6. Dutchmen
7. Waterbury
8. Harriers
"Jrake
TXO
Lateer
TXO
Swartout
Dutchmen
Baker
Harriers
Klein
Waterbury
LEAGUE III
1. Kappa Beta
2. Park House South
3. Potter Club
4. Utopians
5. Harriers
6. APA
7. Waterbury
8. Desert Rates
Butler
Utopians
Millard
Kappa Beta
Battist
Utopians
Dick Crossett's 15-foot jump shot with five seconds
remaining in the second overtime period gave the Albany State basketball team an 83-81 upset win over
Plattsburgh State Wednesday night in an away game.
Tomorrow night the Peds face the University of Buffalo
in a contest that could decide an NCAA playoff bid.
Buffalo has romped over jfQ If-.. 1 0 » | l O P
its last two opponents and HP H C j LOdUcI
whipped the Peds 89-65 Last Saturday at Schade's Acadwhen the two met on De- emy, the iron-armed keglers of
cember 12. The game is in the AMIA first league paced themthe Armory, at 8:15 p.m. selves through six games and five
3-0
3-1
3-1
2-2
2-3
0-2
0-4
65
^8
55
53
52
3-0
2-0
3-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-3
0-3
48
37
36
35
34
4-0
3-0
2-2
2-2
1-2
1-2
1-3
0-3
51,
46
43
AMIA PLAYERS battle for rebound in league play last week in
Page gym
LeBleu
Gates
Potter Club
Park South
LEAGUE IV
1. Commuters
2. One-Eyes
3. Grads
4. APA
5. F'Nurds
& Park House
*7. Pit
8. Waterbury Janitors
9. Waterbury
10. Movements
11. Retards
12. TXO
Dorr
TXO.
LaReau
Commuters
Pasko
Commuters
Gramaglia
Pit
Stanley
Commuters
42
40
4-0
2-0
2-0
2-0
1-0
1-2
1-2
0-1
0-1
0-2
0-2
0-3
55
48
45
38
36
ASP *****
* * * * *
Zeh Brothers Give Peds
Talented Hardcourt Duo
by Dan Oppedisano
Bobby and Danny Zeh are two good reasons why the
Albany State basketball team is having one of its better
seasons in recent years. Bob.theplaymakerof the team
and leader in assists, is currently average 6.0 points
a game. Dan is averaging 11.7 points a game and is
second in regounding.
Jefferson Central High
School, Jefferson, New
York, is the alma mater
of the two brothers. At
Jefferson they both lettered
in baseball, basketball, and
Don Zeh
Bob Zeh
cross-country.
Bobby, the older of the two, stands
6' and weighs 170 pounds. He transferred from Coblesklll In order to
complete his business courses and
to pursue a teaching career. Bob
hopes to begin teaching In September.
Bobby's major Interest besides
basketball Is swimming, and in tlie
summer he is a life guard at a local
swimming pool. At State, Bob has
been on the basketball team for two
years and In the spring he plays
Intramural softhall.
Bob broke Into the starting lineup In the middle of last season,
and soon became a.favorite of the
fans because of his aggressiveness
on the court, When asked about his
biggest thrill, Bob stated that the
current win streak has been his
' biggest so far,
Danny, a strapping c* 3 " 185
pounder, has been a member of tlie
basketball team In each of his four
years at State.'When tlie math major
came here as a freshman he made
his presence known with a very fine
1». 1965
18.7 averRge. in his sophomore year
he was starting for the varsity and
helping the team out with strong r e bounding.
He is also a member of Bob
Burlingame's dlainondmen, playing
in the outfield.
Danny feels that his biggest thrill
was tlie 70-49 win over Siena In
the beginning of the season. Dan
also scored 38 points in the Marlst
game, setting a Capitol City Tournament record. As a result of his
fine performance, he was a cowinner of the Most Valuable Player
award,
In reference to the upcoming Buffalo game at the Armory tomorrow
night, Bobby was quoted as saying:
"I think we have a good chance to
win if we play a good game. We
have to play two good halves and
we're Just about due for two good
ones,"
Danny stated; "It will be a close
game and we'll have to play one of
our better games to beat them,"
Albany Fencers Drop
First Match, Next
Competition Sunday
State's victory Is even more sur- hours of competition. The final r e prising when one considers that Jim sults showed that defending chamO'Donovan and Danny Zeh did not pion Kappa Beta had stretched its
play in the overtime periods, having lead to four points over the second'
place Commuters.
fouled out in the fourth quarter.
In the opening round matches
the Goobers shutout the Infinites,
Down at Half
7-0, APA whipped the Elberons,
The score at the half was 33-29 5-2, and the New Dormers blanked
in favor of Plattsburgh. Albany did the Commuters, 7-0. Also, KB took
not score until 14:42 of the second 5 points from Potter.
half, and at that point was down by
In the afternoon matches, tlie
18 points.
Moals topped APA 5-2, KB scored
State closed the gap to four points a 5-2 win over the New Dormers,
with 10 minutes remaining, but the Goobers beat EEP 5-2, and the
Plattsburgh opened its lead to 13 Commuters took all 7 from the Inpoints with five minutes to go. finites.
State fought back until Mike Bloom
Here are
some outstanding
knotted the score at 7G all with 1:09
—
left, sending the game into over- scores:
1. Dick Kimball
247-630
time.
2. Russ McDouball
257-026
In the first overtime period, Jim
3.
Tim
Motala
213-004
Lange tallied first, a driving layup,
208-501
to give the Peds a 78-76 lead. Dick 4. Bob Rifenberick
222-500
Crossett's free throw made it 79- 5. Kirk Ellis
195-500
76, but Plattsburgh's Chapin regis- 0. Tom Leteer
7.
Gordle
Muck
:.92-554
tered a three point play to send the
8.
Tom
Piotrowski
210-541
game into a second overtime.
196-540
Chapin led off the scoring for 9. Joe Grouse
209-552
Plattsburgh with a basket, but Cros- 10. Joe Loudis
11.
Dan
Thomas
189-542
sett's free throws evened the score
12. Chuck Gilmore
201-535
at 81-81.
The SUA Fencing Team suffered
an overwhelming defeat at the sabres
of the Tri-City Club at the Schenectady YMCA on Sunday Feb. 14.
State fielded a G-man foil team
and a 3-man sabre team.
With the exception of the captain,
Bob Tamm, the remaining team
members saw competition for the
first time against the more experienced Tri-City team.
Here are the results:
Team Standings
FOIL: Tri-City 30, State 6
Crossett Wins It
60-24
SABRE: Tri-City 6, State 3
Albany then pressed tlie Platts- 1. KB
56-28
FOIL
2.
Commuters
burgh squad and stole the ball.
56-28
Crossett then iced tlie game with 3. Goobers
55-29
Name
Record ^lis jumper with five seconds r e - 4. Moals
50-34
Bob Tamm
4-2
maining, giving State its 12th win 5. APA
30-41
Rich Dolly
6.
Elberons
1-5
In a row, 15-3 overall.
34-43
Steven Kidder
7. Potter
1-5 '
Crossett and O'Donovan each
27-57
Bob LaVallee
0-6
scored 23 points, and Bob Zeh and 8. New Dorm
20-64
Jack Wolslegel
0-6
9. Infinites
Mike Bloom had 12 apiece.
18-02
SABRE
Steve White had 21 points for the 10. Waterbury
•dropped
out of the league
Bob Tamm
2-1
losers, and Cliff Winslow had 23.
Tom Hladik
1-2
Jack Wolslegel
0-3
The SUA Fencing Team will hold
a meet with North Adams on Sunday,
February 21, at 2:00 p.m. in the
Bru Game Room. Spectators are
welcome.
Future meets for the fencing team
included matches with R.P.I., West
Point, and Lennox.
NOTICI
Voileyooll
On February 25 at 7:15 p.m. the
women of Gamma Kappa will meet
the women of Sigma Alpha in a
WAA volleyball game In lower Page
Hall.
Buffalo Tourney News
At the Association of College
Unions Region rf Recreation Tournament held at the State University
of New York at Buffalo on February 12-13, Tom Piotrowski '08 captured 4th place In the men's AllEvents Bowjing,
Along with the other top finishers,*
Tom will represent Region II at tlie
National Association of College
Unions Bowling Tournament to be
held early this spring at a site yet
to lie selected.
Karen Bock, competing In women's pocket billiards, finished second to the entry from Cornell Univ.
Sal Gamblno took fourth place in
men's pocket billiards after defeating Delhi and bowing to Canlsius
and Syracuse.
The table tennis team, Tom SloCIIIII and Gordon Hutchlns, were
eliminated from singles and doubles
competition after second round
losses.
The women's bowling team
finished sixth out of seven In team
howling and the men wound up In
slxlh place out of 14 computers.
Tom Piotrowski and Boh Rifenberick placed second In the men's
doubles competition,
The chess club took third place
J,n team play, and Dick Crepeau
copped sixth place In Individual
match play,
4
4
5
10
20 1/2
22 1/2
33
40
32*
A RayView of Sports
by Ray McCloat
There are two types of fencing practiced by the
team: foil, where light equipment and weapons were
used, and sabre, where the weapons, are heavier and
the scoring is different. Only men are allowed to
participate in sabre fencing.
The SUA team practices foil fencing in lower Pierce
Hall on Wednesdays, and sabre fencing in the Brubacher game room on Saturdays.
Because of the lack of fencing teams in the area, the
SUA team has to compete against various clubs that are
far more experienced than the three-year-old State
squad.
A call to arms has beenproclaimedby the SUA Fencing Team. This merry band of kindly cut-throats is
open for increased membership, and is inviting male
and female alike to join their ranks in defending the
honor of Albany.
Unlike defenders of old, thee sleep-lovers never
do battle at dawn, choosing the more civilized hours,
of 7-9 p.m. on Wednesdays and 9-12 a.m. on Saturdays
to fil one another.
Sunday the fencers play host to North Adanu, Mass.,
at 2:00 p.m. in the Bru game room. Team cap.ain Robe r t Tamm is confident that once people realize the
mental and physical benefits and enjoyment derived
from competitive fencing, there will be a much larger
turnout of fencers at State.
Those who are interested In joining the team are
invited to attend the Wednesday meeting.
The most successful State representative at the
recent Buffalo tournament was freshman bowler Tom
Piotrowski from Schenectady.
Tom, an exhuberant redhead, rolled a 1681 sixgame set (187 norm) that qualified him for the Individual finals, probably to be held in Minneapolis.
•m\U>—
Ml,
,ftV
A Free Press,!
A Free
University
W e r e You
m^tfs
Buffaloed?
Albany Student Press
ALBANY 3 , N E W YORK
FEBRUARY 2 3 , 1965
Marchers Protest
Vietnam Intervention
Siena Students Protest
A group of Siena students were
also present, protesting the march.
They followed tiie demonstrators
carrying their own signs. One of
their leaders said they were protesting tlie inarch because they felt
that "if we withdrew from Vietnam
we would lie conceding to tlie Communists again."
Two Siena students, who covered
the story lor tlie Siena newspaper
and radio station, have planned a
special program on the march. Gary
Delain and Philip Lord will represent tlie view of the picketers and
several Siena students will defend
their point of view affirming the
continuance of tlie war effort.
WSUA Sponsors
Bus Fare Contest
WSUA, the "Silver Dollar" campus radio station, Is currently sponsoring a drawing for a prize in the
form of a free bus trip home for
Spring vacation recess. One student
will be eligible for the prize.
The contest Is open to the entire
student body. In order to be eligible,
tlie student's name, student number,
and residence hall should be listed
on a 3 x D card. Tills card should
then lie deposited at the WSUA Studio
Center In Lower Brubacher, or
placed under "W" in student mail,
Each submitted name will lie read
over tlie air five times during the
upcoming weeks. When his name is
called over the air, the student must
call 482-2843 or go in person to
the WSUA studio. Those who acknowledge their names will have them
placed In the "Winner's Circle."
Shortly before Spring Vacation,
WSUA will draw the lucky name from
the "Winner's Circle," and will
award, in cash, the equivalent of the
student's bus fare homo.
LI NO. 4
Referendum Concludes
Todoy; Voting Heavy
A group of about twentyfive people gathered in
front of the State Capitol
last Saturday to protest
United States intervention
in Vietnam. They began
their march at 2 p.m. and
proceeded single file down
State Street to the Post
Office.
When they reached the Post Office
they paraded around carrying signs
calling for a cease fire in Vietnam
and a United Nations force to keep
the peace. After their picketing they
returned to the Capitol and dispersed.
Many State students and professors took part in the demonstration. Dr. Richard Wllkie, of the
Speecli Department, played songs
on his banjo.
State Student Organizer
Gary Delain, a student at State
and one of tlie organizers of the
march, give these reasons for his
part In the march. "We don't stand
a chance of winning the war In Vietnam. Tlie longer we wait the better
chance tlie Communists have of winning. We want a negotiated settlement with a United Nations peace
force."
Tlie march was part of a nationwide demonstration sponsored by
"Women's International League for
Peace and Freedom." The League
furnished the marchers with two
pamphlets, "Some Facts About Vietnam," and "Memo on Vietnam,"
which were distributed to people on
the street.
The brochures gave the background and nature of tlie war. historical and political perspectives
and alternatives of tlie war.
VOL.
The second voting session on the referendum for the
proposed interim government ends today. After the
referendum received only 10% of the needed 20% vote
of the student body, the Student Senate planned the
second voting period, February 21-23, which was p r e ceded by an extensivie publicity campaign.
In b r o c h u r e s , which w e r e
distributed to both resident
and commuting students,
the current situation of Student Government was explained.
A GROUP OF Albanian citizens, together with some State students, march u p State Street protesting U. S. Government action
in Vietnam.
The information in this brochure
was supplemented last night when
President Johnston was invited to
discuss tlie new government at the
New Campus.
If the referendum ispassed,which
seems probable, judging by the large
turn-out of students who voted on
Sunday, voting for tlie Provisional
Council will take place Tuesday,
March 2-4, In tlie Commons from
Music Department Faculty Presents
Annual Classical Concert Thursday
Music Council will present the annual Faculty
Concert Thursday evening
at 8:15 p.m. in Page Hall.
The concert is part of the
series of events presented
by Musical Council each
year.
The Faculty of the Music Department will perfort'' tlie Quintet
for Piano and Strings by Mozart,
the Brahms Clarinet Quintet and
arias by Verdi, Wagner, Purcell,
and Mozart.
Faculty artists featured in the
concert are Laurence Farrell, William Hudson, Karl Peterson, and
Charles Stokes. Assisting in various works will be Edward Rice,
Leo Mahigian, Arthur Catncala,
and Margret Anderson Stokes.
Mr. Farrell, pianist, was trained
at New York University and tile
Eastman School of Music. He joined
tlie faculty of this University In
1003, with experience both as a
teacher of music theory and as a
recitalist in New York and Rochester.
Appears in Europe
Tlie featured clarinetist, William
Hudson, lias appeared throughout
Europe and America as soloist and
first Clarinet with professional orchestras and chamber groups.
Basso Karl Peterson studied at
the Jullliard School of Music, Columbia University and under Madam
Ella Toedt and Karl Gutekunst.
Vlollst Charles F. Stokes is currently with the Rice String Quartet,
and is solo Vlolist witli the Albany
Symphony Orchestra.
Talented Assistants
Edward Rice is known as tlie leader
of the Rice String Quartet, Concert
Master of tlie Albany Symphony Orchestra, and staff violist lor WGY
Radio, Leo Mahigian Is with the
Rice String Quartet and is assistant
concert-master of the Albany Symphony.
Arthur Catrlcala and Margaret
Anderson Stokes complete the list
of artists, Mr, Catrlcala, cellist,
Is with tlie Schenectady Symphony
and Is a well-known soloist In this
area. Mrs. Stokes is an accomplished pianist who lias appeared
in every concert since 1944,
9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. and Tuesday,
March 2, during the dinner hour at
the New Campus Dining Hall.
Students are needed to work with
the Election Commissionduringthls
election. Any student interested in
helping the commission should contact Tony Riservato through the student mail or call HE 2-3801.
Results of the referendum will
be posted tonight and tomorrow
morning in the residence halls and
In the academic buildings. Anyone
with a 2.0 accumulative average is
eligible to run for a position on the
Council.
Self-nominating applications will
be available Thursday and Friday
in D-110 and at the Student Activities Desk in Brubacher. They must
be returned to these same offices
by 5 p.m. on Friday or the nomination will not be valid.
If tlie referendum is passed the
following positions will be available: 10 members (4 per class)
to tlie Provisional Council, 13 members (second-semester Juniors) to
MYSKANIA, and President, Vice
President, Secretary, and Treasurer of each class.
This Council will appoint ten additional members to represent the
areas which will eventually form
the Commissions of the new government. These areas are (1) Academic Interesss, (2) Communications, (3) Community Programming,
(4) Living Areas, and (5) Religious
Interests.
Results of this election will be
announced at traditional Inauguration Day ceremonies which will be
held In Page Hall, Saturday, March
6, at 1 p.m. Announcement of class
officers, St -lit Ambassador, Special Day Co-chairman, and Provisional Council members will then
be made.
Try-Outs to Begin
For March Series
Of A. 0. Dramas
MUSIC DEPARTMENT FACULTY members as they prepare for
the concert. From left they are William Hudson, Charles Stokes,
Karl Peterson, and Laurence Farrell.
Economic Education Prof Compiles
Bibliography for Class, Graduate Use
J. Woodrow Sayre, associate professor of economic education at
SUNY at Albany, has compiled an
annotated
bibliography
entitled
"Paperbound Books in Economics,
196D." Tlie book is being published
by tlie New York State Council on
Economic Education.
Mr. Sayre is, at tlie present time,
the executive director of the Center
for Economic Education located at
State.
The publication has been prepared
for instructional use In tlie classroom, and is available to any teacher
in New York State upon request. The
9T>-page pamphlet Is also useful as
an aid for graduate study in economics, as well as an Instrument for
(lie general strengthening of economic knowledge.
Subjects listed include agriculture economics, business enter-
prise, and comparative economic
systems to labor economics, economic history, and readings from
economic literature.
Economists and councils cooperating with Mr. Sayre ill the publication of the bibliography includes
Robert Sedgwick, Syracuse University; Laurence E. Learner, llarpur
College, of tlie New York State
Council on Economic Education;
Howard Marshall, Vassar College,
Hudson Valley Council on Economic
Education; and Arnold Sametz, New
York University, New York City
Council on Economic Education,
The New York State Council on
Economic Education, affiliated with
tlie national Joint Council on Economic Education, is part of a local
and state network aimed at strentheiiing tlie classroom economic curriculum,
Tryouts for the next series of
Advanced Dramatics plays will be
held tomorrow and Thursday, in the
Commons at 7:30 p.m. They will include tlie following plays: "Lord
Byron's Love Letter" by Tennessee
Williams, "A Dollar" by David Pinski, and "A Morality Play for tlie
Leisured Class" by John L. Balderston.
"Lord Byron's Love Letter" will
be directed by Cindy Gale. It shows
the genteel life of two women who
live In the past. After a brush with
the coarse, outside world, the reality
of their secluded home Is made
aware to them.
"A Dollar" to be directed by
Sheila Brown, satirizes the modern
materialistic desire for money.The
plot presents an allegorical theme
wltii symbolic characterization,
"A Morality Flay for tlie Leisured
Class" will be directed by Paul
Jensen and gives the author's "offbeat" view of life after death. This
theme is resolved by the two characters In an unexpected twist at tin
end.
There are many parts available
for both men and women. Anyone
is eligible to try out for a part.
These plays will be presented on
March 17 and 16, in R-291.
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