ACS General Chemistry Exam-Second

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Florida Community College at Jacksonville
Syllabus:
CHM 2046C: General Chemistry II
4 cr.
Section: 284690
Fall Term 2008
SITE: D-211/D204
DAY/TIME: Lecture:
Tuesday and Thursday 1:00-4:00 p.m. D-211
Lab:
Thursday 2:00-4:00 p.m. D-204
Pretesting: Tuesday and Thursday 12:30-1:00 p.m.; 4:00-4:30 p.m.
FCCJ Course Description:
This course, a continuation of General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis I, stresses chemical
equilibrium, chemical kinetics, electrochemistry, oxidation-reduction and selected families of
metals and non-metals. Laboratory work includes studies of ionic equilibrium in aqueous
solutions and semi-micro qualitative analysis. Six contact hours: three lecture hours, three
laboratory hours. A.A., A.S., A.A.S.
Prerequisites: grade of C or better in CHM 2045C.
(3 class hours, 3 lab hours, 4 credit hours)
Required Textbooks:
Lecture Text, Laboratory Text, Supplies, and Materials:
John C. Kotz, Paul M. Treichel and Gabriela C. Weaver
Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity (with General ChemistryNOW CD-ROM)
6th Edition © 2006*
*(some may have 7th Edition sold in Bookstore)
Case Bound 8 1/2 x 10
Thompson Learning: Brooks Cole Publishers
1322 Pages
ISBN: 053499766X
Book is an Old Edition only the 7th Edition is in Bookstore (Grading outline will be
developed week by week for the 7th edition.)
CHM 2046C covers Chapter 11, 13-20, 23 in Eight Modules
Table of Contents
CHM 2046C General Chemistry and Qualitative Analysis II
11. Carbon--More Than Just Another Element.
Interchapter: THE CHEMISTRY OF LIFE: BIOCHEMISTRY
13. Intermolecular Forces, Liquids, and Solids.
Interchapter: THE CHEMISTRY OF MODERN MATERIALS
14. Solutions and Their Behavior.
15. Principles of Reactivity:Chemical Kinetics.
16. Principles of Reactivity:Chemical Equilibria.
17. Principles of Reactivity:The Chemistry of Acids and Bases.
18. Principles of Reactivity:Other Aspects of Aqueous Equilibria.
19. Principles of Reactivity: Entropy and Free Energy.
20. Principles of Reactivity:Electron Transfer Reactions.
Interchapter: THE CHEMISTRY OF THE ENVIRONMENT
21. The Chemistry of the Main Group Elements. (not covered)
22. The Chemistry of the Transition Elements (not covered)
23. Nuclear Chemistry. (optional-if time permits)
Laboratory Text: Weekly Printouts from Student CD and/or also Posted on Web Site
Required: Scientific Calculator (non-alphanumeric)
Optional Texts/Online Activity:
If you purchased the book new, then you have access to ChemistryNOW web site. If you purchased it used, then if
the access code was not registered by the previous owner, then you should register your access. To purchase from
Brooks-Cole:
General ChemistryNOW™ 2-Semester Instant Access Code
for Kotz/Treichel/Weaver's Chemistry and Chemical Reactivity, 6th Edition
ISBN-10: 0-534-40022-1
© 2006 (price $46.47-New price) not available in bookstore
Student Solutions Manual (New: $46.49) not available in Book store
ISBN-10: 0534998526
The Student Solutions Manual, written by Alton Banks, North Carolina State University contains detailed solutions to
selected end-of-chapter Study Questions found in the text. Solutions match the problem-solving strategies used in the
text. Sample chapters are available for review at the text's website at http://chemistry.brookscole.com.
Study Guide $42.99 (Bookstore $59.75)
ISBN-10: 0534998518 | ISBN-13: 9780534998516
The perfect way to prepare for exams, this Study Guide for CHEMISTRY AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY makes studying
efficient and easy. It includes an overview, key terms and definitions for each chapter as well as study tips and
worked out examples. Sample tests give you the practice you need to succeed on exams.
Required only if ACS 2nd Semester General Chemistry Exam is used:
Preparing for Your ACS Examinations
In
General Chemistry
The Official Guide;
Eubanks, Lucy T, & Eubanks, Dwaine I,
ACS
American Chemical Society
Division of Chemical Education;
1998
General Chemistry Exams - Official Study Guide ($12.00)
Topics Covered
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Atomic Structure (CHM 2045C)
Molecular Structure and Bonding (CHM 2045C)
Stoichiometry (CHM 2045C)
States of Matter / Solutions (CHM 2045C)
Energetics (CHM 2045C)
Dynamics (CHM 2046C)
Equilibrium (CHEM 1212)
Electrochemistry / Redox (CHM 2046C) (CHM 2045C)
Descriptive Chemistry / Periodicity (CHM 2046C) (CHM 2045C)
Laboratory Chemistry (CHM 2045C) (CHM 2046C)
Features
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Description of important ideas included in each topic
Questions that emphasize the concepts most frequently studied
Analysis of how to think through each study question
Worked-out solution for each study question
Insight into how wrong responses are constructed
Practice questions for you to try on your own
Answers for all questions
Goggles or Visorgogs
Instructor: John T. Taylor About Me Resume
Office: D-270
Office Phone: 904-766-6763
Internet:
(904) 410-1924
Cell Phone: 904-614-0531 or leave messages at instructor’s home at designated
times or extreme emergencies on weekends. (Jacksonville 904-992-2052 most weekends)
Link to site: http://www.fccj.us/OfficeF08.htm
for current office hours
The instructor is available for additional office hours by appointment.
Appointments must be made at least two days in advance, except for extreme
emergencies. Office hours are subject to change
email: [email protected]
E-Mail assignments to both addresses below
Subjects of emails must describe briefly the assignments being submitted and
begin with the # 46:
i.e. 46: First Email or 46: your subject
Email Requirement:
Each student should send the instructor an email during the first week from both your FCCJ email account and/or an
outside email account for your primary contact, and the other as a backup contact. Be certain you put in subject box:
46: first email
Tell me about yourself. Why are you taking this course? When did you complete CHM 2045C, where, with which
instructor, and your grade. What is your highest math course completed? Where do you live? What are your telephone
numbers? What is your external email address which can serve as a backup to FCCJ assigned email.
Always begin the subject of each email with 46:
Subject-less emails will be deleted or subjects without the number code may be deleted. Attachments will only be
opened if the number code is in the subject line. This prevents viruses and spam.
ATTENDANCE:
Students are expected to attend class and will be responsible for all material presented. The student must sign the
attendance roster to earn credit for attendance. Each on campus class attended will be worth one point. The
student will fill out a data card similar to your instructor one the last page of this syllabus worth one point of the two
points for the first day’s attendance. One student will serve as attendance monitor and record the day’s attendance
for end of term point assignment. Student will sign lab role twice, once in the beginning of lab and then when they
leave noting time out.
Online First Week Activities:
The descriptions may be found at:
http://www.hccfl.edu/faculty/john_taylor/cgs1555/spring04/syllabus/activity.htm
Free Time Chart: Find me 10 hours per week of the 168 weekly total: List them
Description: http://www.hccfl.edu/faculty/john_taylor/cgs1555/spring04/syllabus/freetime.htm
Activity:
http://college.hmco.com/masterstudent/series/becoming_a_master_student/11e/students/by_chapter/02.html
Free Time First Lab Exercise:
Chemistry takes a lot of time to study. Each student should identify at least 10 hours or more
per week of free time that she/he will commit towards his/her study of chemistry. The
following are suggested strategies for scheduling your study times. Make an hour by hour
seven day matrix 8 columns (hour and each day of the week) by 24 lines (representing each
hour). See Master Student Web Site above. A blank matrix has been attached to this syllabus
for you to complete.
Starting with wake-up and end with sleeping:
1. Schedule fixed blocks of time first. These include work, class time, eating, and sleeping.
2. Include time for travel and errands
3. Schedule time for fun.
4. Set realistic goals.
5. Allow flexibility in your schedule.
6. Study at least two hours for every hour in class plus an extra two for computer assignments in the open lab and an extra two
with a cooperative group member for homework comparison and checking.
7. Avoid scheduling marathon study sessions.
8. Set clear starting and stopping times.
9. Plan for the Unplanned!
Study Groups/Phone Network/Lab Partner:
On the first day of class each student will complete a Data Card, Interview a peer, and introduce (if time permits) that
peer to the class. From these exercises and the learning styles inventory, study groups, a phone network, and lab partners need
to be established. Study areas, as well as the classroom, should be used for study groups plus lunch and learn sessions. Some
portions of the office times may meet in the library computer learning lab. Each week volunteers will be appreciated to assist
in the group operation of the class. The first personal assistant volunteer will prepare a matrix with each student’s free study
time so that study groups may begin to be formed the second week of school. The phone network will be established so that in
case of emergencies by the instructor each student will be responsible to call two other students in the network to alert the
student of the emergency so that information may be distributed prior to the next scheduled class. Emergencies will usually
also include a group email on the morning/afternoon of the class meeting.
Required Assessments Week One: TBA
E-Instruction (option) or Clickers:
During a scheduled class (75-90 minutes), after going through the lecture on the assigned chapters via many
modalities of teaching including Internet web sites, the instructor will utilize either the last 10 minutes or the first 10
minutes of class to go through the Power Point for the assigned chapter as a review.
However, multiple choice questions will be inserted into the online power points which will require all students to
answer via the instructor’s e-Instruction system (keypads). Each correct response will be worth one point, while
an incorrect response will count zero points. e-Instruction system will be worth no more than 50 points (out of
100 possible) for the term (5% total if used Fall Term 2008). For each exam when e-Instruction is not used, the
multiple choice section of the modules will be increased at five to ten questions per chapter.
Students are expected to get 50% correct on each day’s e-Instruction questions. During the term, the instructor may pretest a
section of the multiple choice for the course using the e-Instruction system where the responses will count 1 point each of
the 10 to 15 points assigned to multiple choice for that Module.
CHM 2046C Practice/Take Home/or Pre-Final Exam:
During the last week of school, (Dec 4-Dec 11) students will complete the on-line practice final exam during the last
scheduled lab section (Dec 9) (No other lab activities are scheduled during final exam week). The Prefinal must be completed
before attempting the Final. The course home page will have a link posted December 4 for the prefinal. The prefinal may be
one of the previous finals designated as the practice final (usually the latest term available) or a new mock ACS exam may be
developed for Fall Term 2008. The exam will be closed book and taken with your lab partner in the library computer center.
It will be interactive allowing you to change answers after initial scoring. If it is from ExamView, then you are allowed three
submissions. Each cooperative group will submit one practice final section for each module completed during the course.
Both students will receive the same grade for the practice final. The practice final will count as the first 5% completion
towards the final grade. A student may chose to work without a partner. One student will be requested to type the prefinal
into the HTML exam template to allow multiple attempts to achieve the answer, otherwise ExamView will be utilized which
does not have multiple tries available.
ACS General Chemistry Exam-Second-Term or Instructor Made Final Exam from Testbank
The final exam is not optional. It will be the 75 (best 50 will be scored) questions of the standard American
Chemical Society General Chemistry-Second Term Exam. The Final counts as two to three modular test
scores or 10% of the total grade. The multiple choice sections of the module exams are mini-tests of the final as
well as online multiple choice homework. If you score more than 50 correct answers, the instructor will award
bonus 1 point per correct answer (not adjusted to 2.0 factor for the first 50 correct questions). If the Final exam
is not ACS, then it will be 100 questions worth one point each. Questions selected from Kotz 6e testbank.
ACS General Chemistry-Second Term Breakdown
____(10) Solutions
____(10) Kinetics
____(10) Equilibrium
____(10) Thermodynamics
____(10) Electrochemistry
____(05) Nuclear
____(05) Polymers
____(05) Descriptive
____(05) Organic
____(05) Solids
____(75) Total
Final Exam Challenge:
If a student scores a higher % on the final exam (all 75 questions-adjusted ACS norm score) then the grade earned
through the total points assigned, then the Final Exam score will constitute the final grade average for the lecture. The
instructor will not drop the lowest exam score during the course, but may allow post-testing the last two weeks to raise a poor
score earned earlier in the course. A special post test day is Saturday December 6 at 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. in D-207. However,
the student scoring the highest final exam grade as long as its better than 70%, will receive a final grade of an “A”
Chemistry and the World Wide Web:
CHM 2046C Home Page: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046.html
Grading Outline/Sample Quizzes: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdF08.htm
Online Grade Calculator: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdcal.html
Email/Phone Contacts: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46email.html (not posted Spring 08 term)
Kotz 5th ed.Text Power Points: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46pptmenu.html
Daily Pretest Quizzes (optional):
Pretest quizzes may be administered before (12:30-1:00), sometimes during, and/or after (4:00-4:30) every class
which is not a scheduled exam day. These pretest quizzes may not be made up outside of class time, unless
directed by the instructor to complete the pretest in the test center during an assigned period of time.
Scored pretest quizzes are NOT recorded in the instructor’s grade book or on Blackboard, but must be
attached to the Modular Exam Grading Outline the day of the exam to receive the pretest grade. This pretest
packet is submitted as a separate packet. Students must write the scores on both the cover sheet of the pretest
packet and on the front page of each exam.
The student will skip the section of the modular exam that is pre-tested. The Pretest scores sometimes may be
recorded on the attendance sheet, but only for your instructor’s sense of current levels of class achievement. If
you loose the graded pretests, you will have to do the section over on the exam.
The instructor only records Module Exam totals and the Final Exam in his grade book and on Blackboard. Multiple
choice and vocabulary sections of modules are usually only tested on exam day and are usually never pre-tested
or post-tested.
Do Not Staple the Modular Exams together as they are graded separately, listed on Blackboard separately, and
returned separately after the exam day. Please staple carefully as directed. Mixing the modular papers on Exam
day may result in a lower grade.
1. Pretests are exams. They are not open book. They are
not open notes. They are not collaboration with your
neighbor.
2. The pretests may NOT be used during the exam!
3. You must do the pretests in class. You may NOT take the
pretests home.
Samples of each section (pretest) of each exam may be found on the grading outline on
the web site. On the sample tests are suggestions for paper and pencil homework in the
textbook. The grading outline may be found at:
Kotz 6th Edition: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdF08.htm
McMurray 5th edition: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdF08McM.htm
Pre-testing is a privilege not a right!
Our classroom D-211 may not have a scheduled class in the room before our class
on Tuesday and Thursday. Pretesting will begin at 12:30 to 1:00 p.m. each class day and must
be completed before class begins at 1:00. Students who are late to class (after 1:00), will not
be allowed to pretest until after class. Students should plan to stay late if they can not arrive
early. Many times the pretest will not be administered till the last 5 minutes of class so that
student may complete the item after class has concluded. Pretest will be graded for all
students who stay after 4:00 p.m. Pretesting may also be done 4:00-4:30 p.m.
Post-Testing:
The instructor may post test sections of the modular exams that a majority of the students on designated days.
Multiple choice and vocabulary sections may not be post-tested. The designated last day for post testing is
Saturday December 6 at a time to be announced.(Either 10:30-3:30 or 1:00-5:30 depending if dr. Darby has her
Winter Festival on that day. The post test is a free attempt. Scoring lower on the post test than on the modular
exam section will not penalize the student. The post test will be ignored and the exam section score will count.
Improving on the post test will replace that section’s score on the modular exam and the improvement will raise
the score of the modular test. A student scores 5 out of 10, post test and scores 10 out of 10, the student’s grade
is improved by the net five points. . The student will resubmit his/her exam with the graded post test stapled on top
for an adjustment in the modular exam score. If the student does not have her/his exam, then post testing
will NOT be possible. Post testing is allowed only on items that the instructor has a third or fouth different
post test available. If post tests are not available, then they may not be post tested.
MAKE-UP POLICY:
Make-up exams are usually not given. In the event of an unavoidable absence on exam day (jury duty,
hospitalization, incarceration, and death in the immediate family), you will be allowed make-up tests only upon the
instructor’s approval.. You must contact the instructor, no later than, the week of the exam in order to discuss what
arrangements might be made. This may be done with a quick email. A message must be left on the instructor's email ([email protected] ) or his office phone 766-6763 if the instructor cannot be reached. If a makeup is allowed, it
must be completed prior to return of the exam papers completed by the students attending the scheduled exam.
Missed exams will otherwise count as 0 points. Papers are returned usually after one or two weekends after the
exam.
Students who take the test on the assigned day are guaranteed to receive their graded exam on or before the next exam day,
otherwise the student will be assigned a 100% grade for the un-graded paper. Students not taking the exam on the assigned
exam day may not receive their grade until days or weeks after the class papers are returned.
A-16 Tentative Exam Schedule North Campus:
Bonding Concepts Pretest: Lecture Tuesday August 26
Exam #1 (Modules 4II & 16) Thursday September 4
Exam #2 (Modules 7II & 8II) Tuesday September 23
Exam #3 (Modules 9 &10) Tuesday October 21
Exam #4 (Modules 11&12) Thursday November 6
Exam#5 (Module 13, 14, 15) Thursday December 4
On-Line Prefinal will be available December 4-December 11 until 1:00 p.m.)
Final Exam: Thursday December 11: 1:00-4:00 p.m.
Major Learning Outcomes (Goals):
This course is designed as the second semester of a two semester
sequence of College Chemistry. CHM 2046C has been modified and
streamlined to accomplish the following major learning outcomes in 45-60
total hours of class and instruction. Students entering the class should have
had CHM2045C with a passing grade.
. Learning Objectives for General Chemistry II
Students who have completed General Chemistry I (CHM 2045C) are expected to demonstrate knowledge of the following
content-based learning objectives. The learning objectives are arranged by major content area.
Module 4 Part II: Objectives (Chapters 9 & 10): (Review from CHM 2045C)
Terms: valence electrons, chemical bond formation, bonding in ionic compounds, covalent bonding, bond properties,
charge distribution, in covalent compounds, molecular shapes, molecular polarity, orbitals and bonding theories,
valence bond theory, and molecular orbital theory.
1. Predict molecular geometry of a molecule.
2. Predict and explain the polarity of a molecule.
3. Explain the geometry of a molecule using one of the bonding theories.
4. Predict the hybrid orbital type for an atom in a covalent molecular
Module 16 formerly Module 4_III Organic Chemistry (Chapter 11)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
 Define organic chemistry.
 Know the four types of hydrocarbons including their general formula, hybridization, bond angle, name
ending, and some examples of each.
 Define structural isomers and stereoisomers and provide examples of each.
 Describe the difference between saturated and unsaturated hydrocarbons and give examples.
 Define functional group.
 Provide general structure, functional group, name ending and some examples of several families of
organic compounds including alcohols, aldehydes, ketones., carboxylic acids, esters, amines, and
amides.
Polymer Chemistry or BioChemistry (Chapter 11.5)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
 Define polymer, plastic, thermoplastic, and thermoset.
 Describe the two reaction types used to synthesize polymers and give some specific examples of
each.
 Know the synthesis of polyethylene and its derivatives, polyamides, and polyesters.
 Know the “Big Six” plastics including recycling number, abbreviation, name, structure of the monomer,
thermoplastic or thermoset, and addition or condensation.
 Compare the structural differences, physical properties, and uses of LDPE and HDPE
M-7 Part II Liquids and Solids (Chapter 13)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
 Describe the difference between intermolecular and intramolecular forces.
 Describe and apply the various intermolecular forces including ion/dipole, dipole/dipole, hydrogen
bonding, dipole/induced dipole, and induced dipole/induced dipole.
 Know the properties of liquids in relation to their intermolecular forces.
 Define and apply the terms critical temperature, critical pressure, surface tension, capillary action,
cohesive force, adhesive force, and viscosity.
 Be familiar with the characteristics of the two types of solids – amorphous and crystalline.
 Be familiar with the characteristics of the four types of crystalline solids – ionic, metallic, molecular,
and network.
 Define and apply the terms space lattice and unit cell.
 Be familiar with the characteristics of the three types of cubic unit cell – simple, body-centered, and
face-centered.
 Calculate the radius of an atom or ion based on type of cubic unit cell.
 Be familiar with the characteristics of a simple and face-centered cubic unit cell of an ionic compound
in terms of lattice points occupied by anions and holes occupied by cations.
 Define vaporization or boiling point and melting point.
 Be familiar with the change in enthalpy of fusion, crystallization, vaporization, and condensation.
 Use a phase diagram.
 Define triple point.
Module 8-Part II Solutions and Their Behavior (Chapter 14)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Know and be able to carry out calculations using molarity, molality, mole fraction, weight percent, parts
per million, and parts per billion.
Define solubility, saturated solution, unsaturated solution, supersaturated solution, miscible, and
immiscible.
Determine the solubility of a salt based on the change in enthalpy of solution.
Know and apply the affects of pressure and temperature on the solubility of a gas in a liquid.
Know and apply the affect of temperature on the solubility of a solid in a liquid.
Define and give examples of colligative properties.
Define and perform calculations using Raoult’s Law.
Calculate freezing point depression and boiling point elevation when a solute is added to a solvent
when the solute is an electrolyte and a nonelectrolyte.
Calculate molar masses of compounds based on colligative properties.
Define ion pairing and describe its affect on colligative properties.
Define osmosis, reverse osmosis, and osmotic pressure.
Calculate osmotic pressure.
Define and give examples of the various types of solutions including isotonic, hypotonic, and
hypertonic.
Define crenation and homolysis.
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Define and give examples of colloidal dispersions.
Define and give examples of an emulsion, emulsifying agent, and surfactant.
Describe how soap is made and how it works.
Define hydrophobic and hydrophilic.
Describe what is meant by the term “hard water”.
Module 9 Principles of Reactivity: Chemical Kinetics (Chapter 15)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Define kinetics.
Calculate the average and instantaneous rate of a chemical reaction.
Know the factors that affect the rate of a chemical reaction and how they affect the rate including
concentration, temperature, state of subdivision, and addition of a catalyst.
Write rate equations for chemical reactions based on experimental data.
Determine the order of a chemical reaction.
Determine the rate constant based on experimental data.
Know and apply first order rate equations including calculation of half-lives.
Know and apply zero order and second order rate equations.
Define and apply the collision theory.
Use the Arrhenius equation to find activation energy.
Define reaction mechanism, intermediate, and free radical.
Write rate equations for mechanistic steps.
Define rate-determining step.
Module 10: Principles of Reactivity: Chemical Equilibria (Chapter 16)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Define equilibrium.
Write equilibrium constant expressions for chemical reactions applying rules.
Calculate equilibrium constants using equilibrium constants of other related reactions and from
equilibrium concentrations.
Interpret equilibrium constants in terms of whether the reaction is reactant or product favored.
Assess reaction quotient to determine how a reaction will proceed.
Calculate equilibrium concentrations based on initial concentrations and the equilibrium constant.
Define and apply LeChatelier’s Principle.
Know how reactions at equilibrium are affected by stresses such as temperature, concentration, and
pressure.
Module 11 Principles of Reactivity:
The Chemistry of Acids and Bases (Chapter 17)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Describe the properties of acids and bases.
Define acids and bases in terms of the Arrhenius or Classical definition, the Bronsted-Lowry definition,
and the Lewis definition.
Predict the products of a neutralization reaction.
Provide the self-ionization reaction for water.
Memorize a list of acids and bases including their name, formula, number of protons they can donate
or accept, and strength.
Define monoprotic, diprotic, and triprotic acids and bases.
Write ionization reactions for acids and bases.
Define and give examples of species which are amphiprotic and amphoteric.
Define and apply the terms conjugate acid and conjugate base.
Determine the equilibrium position of an acid-base reaction.
Determine acid and base strength based on Ka and Kb.
Describe the leveling effect.
Write equilibrium expressions for the ionization of weak acids and bases.
Define, apply, and perform calculations using the pH and pOH equations.
Correlate acidity, basicity, pH, pOH, hydronium ion concentration, and hydroxide concentration.
Perform calculations using the equilibrium expression for the ionization of water.
Know two ways to determine pH.
Calculate pH from Ka or Kb using initial concentrations and the equilibrium expression.
Calculate % ionization of a weak acid or base.
Be familiar with the common acid and basic ions that form acidic and basic salts.
Determine equilibrium concentrations for all ionization products of diprotic and triprotic acids.
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Describe how acid strength is affected by the inductive effect and bond strength.
Describe molecules as Lewis acids or bases.
Module 11: Principles of Reactivity:
Other Aspects to Aqueous Equilibria (Chapter 18.1-
18.4)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Define and apply the concept of buffer solutions.
Define pKa and use it in calculations.
Know and apply the Henderson-Hasselbach Equation to buffer systems.
Calculate the pH of a buffer solution before and after a strong acid or base is added.
Perform calculations to determine how you would prepare a buffer solution at a given pH.
Perform calculations that apply the common ion effect to acid and base ionization reactions.
Predict the acidity/basicity of a solution at the equivalence point of a titration based on the strength of
the acid and base reacted.
Calculate the pH at all of the various points during a titration - prior to the equivalence point, at the
equivalence point, and after the equivalence point for all of the following combinations - strong
acid/strong base, strong acid/weak base, and strong base/weak acid.
Generate titration curves for all of the following combinations of reactants: strong acid/strong base,
strong acid/weak base, and strong base/weak acid.
Predict the shape of a titration curve for the titration of a diprotic or triprotic acid.
Define acid-base indicator and determine which is the best choice for predicting the equivalence point
of a particular acid/base combination.
Module 12: Principles of Reactivity: Precipitation Reactions (Chapter 18.4-18.7)
Students must know or be able to do the following:
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Define Ksp.
Write the Ksp expression for a slightly soluble salt.
Determine Ksp from experimental measurements.
Determine salt solubility from Ksp.
Predict whether precipitation will occur based on calculation of reaction quotient.
Calculate solubility before and after a common ion is added to the solution.
Predict the Knet of a reaction via simultaneous equilibria.
Provide equations and discussion to explain how the solubility of a salt is increased by addition of a
weak acid and decreased by the addition of strong acid.
Be familiar with the solubility of complex ions.
Module 13: Principles of Reactivity: Entropy and Free Energy (Chapter 19)
Students must know or be able to do the following:













.
Define thermodynamics.
Know the three laws of thermodynamics.
Know the two fundamental laws of nature.
Define all of the following – change in enthalpy, entropy, and free energy – and give the meaning of a
positive and negative value for each.
Provide examples where entropy is increasing and decreasing.
Calculate the entropy of a system using the equation: S = q/T.
Calculate the entropy of the Universe using the equation: Suniverse = Ssystem + Ssurroundings
Calculate the entropy, enthalpy, and free energy changes of a system by finding the difference in the
summation of the product formation (S, H, or G) minus the summation of the reactant formation (S, H,
or G).
Utilize the equation G = H – TS
Determine if a reaction is enthalpy of entropy-driven.
Describe how a reactant-favored reaction can be made product-favored by coupling it to a very
product-favored reaction.
Determine the minimum temperature needed to make a reaction spontaneous.
Use the equation, G = R T ln K, to find G or K
Module 14: Principles of Reactivity: Electron Transfer Reactions (Chapter 20)
Students must know or be able to do the following:



Define redox reaction, oxidation, reduction, oxidizing agent, and reducing agent.
Provide some examples of redox reactions.
Balance redox reactions in neutral, acidic, and basic solution.





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
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



Draw and describe how an electrochemical cell works.
Calculate G using cell potential: Go = - n F Eo
Calculate cell potential using standard reduction potentials.
Describe how the standard reduction potentials are generated.
Describe the standard hydrogen electrode and provide its purpose.
Describe how a positive/negative reduction potential indicates a better oxidizing/reducing agents.
Use the Nernst equation to calculate cell potential under non-standard conditions.
Calculate the equilibrium constant for a reaction using cell potential via
Ln K = nEo / 0.0257
Define and give examples of primary batteries, secondary batteries, and fuel cells
Define corrosion and be familiar with what causes it.
Provide at least two ways to prevent corrosion.
Define electrolysis and Faraday’s Law
Apply Faraday’s Law in an electrolysis calculation.
Module 15: Nuclear Chemistry (Chapter23)
Students must know or be able to do the following:













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
Define radioactivity and give a brief description of its discovery.
Know the three forms of radiation including symbol, charge, mass, speed, and penetrating power.
Predict products in an alpha emission, beta emission, positron emission, and electron capture.
Briefly describe “Band of Stability”.
Define binding energy and use Einstein’s equation to predict its value.
Define half-life and apply first order kinetics to radioactive decays.
Define Carbon-14 dating and Artificial Transmutation.
Predict products in artificial transmutation reactions.
Define nuclear fission and nuclear fusion.
Describe the parts of a nuclear power reactor.
Define breeder reactor.
Describe nuclear bombs.
Describe several units of radiation.
Describe the major sources of radiation exposure.
Provide some examples of the applications of radioactivity including food irradiation, radioactive
tracers, and medical imaging.
Laboratory
Students must know or be able to do the following:












Carry out an experiment involving intermolecular forces.
Carry out an experiment involving solubility.
Carry out an experiment involving colligative properties.
Carry out a kinetics experiment
Carry out an equilibrium experiment.
Carry out an experiment using a pH meter.
Carry out an experiment involving acid-base titration curves.
Carry out an experiment involving a buffer solution.
Carry out a qualitative analysis experiment.
Carry out a redox experiment.
Carry out an organic synthesis.
Carry out a lab involving polymers.
Quiz monitors, attendance monitor, personal assistants, test preparers, camera persons/editors, study guide word processor
assistant, Chemistry WebMasters, as well as study groups are forms of cooperative learning environments where the student
needs to learn how to function in teams. Each student MUST take charge of his/her commitment to
learning in order to achieve success in not only this course but also in college.
Power Points from the 5th edition of the textbook may be downloaded by the student for their
study. Go to:
http://www.brookscole.com/cgiwadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20bI&discipline_number=12&product_isbn_issn=003033604X
Power Points for the 6th edition may be viewed on Blackboard:
Grading Scale:
Overall Percentages
100 – 90 %
89 – 80 %
79 – 65 %
64 – 50 %
< 50 %
Grade
A*
B*
C*
D*
F
*Lab is an essential part of this class. If you acquire less than 60% in lab, you will automatically receive a letter
grade of ‘F’ in this course. If you make less than 70% in lab you may not earn a final grade above ‘D’
Grade Review:
See Grading Sheet (distributed separately) for a point by point summary of the course. It also serves as a
Course outline, indicating sections of the text being covered on each exam.
Grading Outline: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdF08.htm
Grade Calculator: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdcal.html
Point Grade Summary:
______ (010)
_______(040)
_______(050)
_______(600)
_______(150)
_______(150)
Explorations/Safety Lab wk 1 [Email (2); Dis Wheel: (2) LrnSty:(4) Time:(2) Card (2)
Attendance [Lecture 29+ lectures x 1 point each + 1 pt for lab]
e-Learning (if no e-Instruction Modular Exams will be 650 points)
Modular Exams
Final Exam [20 Practice + 50 of 70 x 2 pts ACS Exam]
Lab Assignments [15x10]
_______(1000) Grand Total Tentative (point)
% Weighting of the Components of the Course:
Exams
Attendance
e-Instruction
Final Exam
Lab Assignments
----------------Total
60-65%
5%
0- 5%
15%
15%
-----------100%
ON-Line Grade Calculator: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdcal.html
Instructor’s Right to Change or Modify Grading Procedures:
This instructor reserves the right to make changes in this syllabus whenever he feels it is appropriate to do so.
The instructor reserves the right to modify or change the grading progress as the course proceeds. Any additional
course assignments will substitute for deleted items. Some may also be modified if not deleted. The instructor will not
add major examinations as a modification and maintain the above general category point distributions. Tests will
constitute ~60-65% of the grade excluding the final’s 15%, 15% for the laboratory component, 0-5% of the grade for
Interactive Classroom Presentation System, and 5% for attendance.
Students absent on exam days will do a makeup exam outside of class time when they return on the next Tuesday or
Thursday following the absence or by special arrangements in the Assessment Center. This exam must be completed before
the next scheduled exam or the day the instructor returns the exam missed. The instructor guarantees the student two days to
make up the exam, but thereafter it depends on the day the tests are returned.
Student who takes the test on the assigned test day are guaranteed to receive their graded exam on or before the next
exam day after completion of the new exam, otherwise the student will be assigned a 100% grade for the un-graded paper.
Lab Reports/Write-ups, and/or Lab Notebook are due prior to the next scheduled lab. Lab reports submitted after
that date may be subject to a one to two point (10-20%) penalty depending on whether the instructor has graded that weeks
lab. Lab Data submitted without calculation will receive a minimum of 5 points (50%). Labs not submitted receive a grade of
zero. Students absent from lab receive a zero. Students attending and submitting all lab reports receive up to 10 extra points as
a student is allowed only one absence from lab.
Other Pertinent Information (Supplemental Notes):
Students with Disabilities: Qualified students with documented disabilities are eligible for physical and
academic accommodations under the American Disabilities Act and Section 504 of the Rehabilitation
Act of 1973. Students requesting accommodations should contact Student Development Services at
264-7220 (voice) or 264-3371 (TTY) and this professor during the first week of class.
Withdrawal Policy:
Students will be allowed to withdraw from this class any time during the semester through Monday,
November 3 for an A-16 schedule and will receive a grade of “W”. Students failing to attend
class for the first two consecutive weeks are subject to withdrawal by the instructor according to FCCJ
policy. These ‘no shows’ must be reported to Admissions and Records by the end of two weeks
Tuesday September 9
Academic Misconduct:
Academic misconduct or dishonesty such as cheating and plagiarism is not permitted. Suspected cases may be
reported to the Dean of Liberal Arts and may result in failure of an assignment, failure for the course or exclusion
from the class. Also, the instructor reserves the right to reassign work to students if the instructor senses the work submitted
is not the work of the student. (No questions asked-The instructor may tell the student to resubmit the work to earn the daily
pretest grade or examination grade or may be assigned a zero if second request is made).
Classroom Etiquette:
Students are expected to conduct themselves as adults in the classroom showing respect to their
classmates. Only persons registered for this class are permitted in the laboratory. As a courtesy to the
instructor and your fellow classmates, cellular telephones and pagers should be cut off before
entering the classroom or laboratory. Likewise, the instructor sometimes forgets to shut his down at
the beginning of class, so hopefully someone sitting close to the front may remind the instructor with a
hand gesture for him to check his phone,
Children in the Classroom Policy: It is the goal of FCCJ to provide a safe and effective learning
environment for all students. Any action, which interferes with this goal, will not be permitted.
Children must not be left unattended at any time on campus. If an emergency arises which requires a
student to bring an underage child (defined as any child under the age of sixteen who is not a FCCJ
student enrolled in a credit class) to campus, the child must be under the direct supervision of an adult
at all times. Parents and guardians of children considered disruptive or unsupervised will be asked to
remove the children from the campus immediately.
Bringing children to the classroom is not permissible under most circumstances. However, if an emergency arises
which necessitates bringing a child to class, the student must receive the prior consent of the faculty member involved.
Children who are ill may not be brought to class regardless of the circumstances. Due to the nature of the equipment,
the subject matter involved, and the level of supervision necessary, underage children will not be allowed in college
laboratories or in the Learning Center at any time and/or under any circumstances.
Children enrolled in non-credit classes must be under the direct supervision of an adult at all times. Likewise, children
attending campus events must be supervised at all times. Any child under the age of 16 must be under the direct
supervision of his/her parent, legal guardian, or other responsible adult when in the college library unless the child is
part of a call AND the supervising teacher or paraprofessional is present
Studying:
In order to do well in this course, it is essential to study and work problems. The
following is a list of study suggestions
1) Read the text chapters before the material is covered in class.
2) Take good notes and review them daily.
3)
4)
5)
6)
Work all assigned homework problems. Do not get behind!!!!!!
Work the practice exams that will be made available without looking at the answer key.
Work problems in ACS study guide.
Use the interactive CD-Rom for studying/or the CD-Rom Printouts.
‘Muddy Water’ Issues:
Each day, students may use 3x5 file cards (as provided by the instructor the first week) to list the day’s muddiest water
issue or send the instructor an email immediately after class. What was confusing? What don’t you understand? What
problems at the end of the chapter overwhelm you? As you leave the classroom, you will submit a card with your name and
the issue or issues. If you are absolutely on target, no problem then no card submitted a card indicates to the instructor you
are on course on time and understand the learning concepts. At the end of each on-line group/individual quiz/homework may
be a place to journal your discovery statements, the muddy water issues, and check list of vocabulary words that you do not
understand.
The Learning Center (D-330)
(904) 766-6718
The Learning Center has chemistry tutoring. Please call for times and appointments.
The Center is open Mon-Thur 8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m. Friday and Saturday 8:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
The Learning Center also needs tutors. Please contact if interested.
Additional Chemistry Web Sites:
Chemdex is a large chemistry directory created by Dr. Mark Winter at the Department of Chemistry,
University of Sheffield, England with links to over 7000 Internet sites: http://www.chemdex.org
Links for chemists and Virtual Library chemistry may be found at:
http://www.liv.ac.uk/chemistry/links
Chemistry Web Guide: http://science.searchbeat.com/chemistry.htm
The NIST Chemistry WebBook (database of physical data and spectra): http://webbook.nist.gov
General Chemistry Texts:
http://academic.cengage.com/cengage/catalog.do?courseid=CH04&disciplinenumber=12&codeid=2C0A&codeFlag=true
Other General Chemistry Text Books with Practice Multiple Choice
Hill: General Chemistry 4th http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_hillpetrucci_genchem_4
Tro: Chemistry-A Molecular Approach: http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_tro_chemistry_1/
Averill: Chemistry Principles, Patterns and Applications http://wps.aw.com/bc_averill_principles_1/47/12214/3126955.cw/index.html
Brown 9th: Chemistry-The Central Science http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_brown_chemistry_9/
Brown 8th: Chemistry-The Central Science http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_brown_chemistry_8e/
Other Introductory Chemistry Texts with Practice Quizzes:
Tro: Fundamentals of Chemistry 4th http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_burns_chemistry_4/
Corwin: Introductory Chemistry 4th: http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_corwin_chemistry_4/
Liberal Arts Texts with Practice Multiple Choice:
World of Chemistry 4th
http://www.brookscole.com/cgiwadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&flag=student&product_isbn_issn=9780495012139&disciplinenumber=12
Chemistry in Focus: A Molecular View of Our World: http://www.brookscole.com/cgiwadsworth/course_products_wp.pl?fid=M20b&flag=student&product_isbn_issn=9780495017691&disciplinenumber=12
Objectives/Links/Tutorials
McMurray5th: http://wps.prenhall.com/esm_mcmurry_chemistry_5/
Adventures in Chemistry (Demonstrations): http://college.cengage.com/chemistry/liberal/millard/chemistry/1e/student_home.html
Ebbing: http://www.hmco.com/college/chemistry/index.html
Alternate Text being used by some students:
Chemistry, 5/E (text used by Dr. Lorenzo and Dr. Gant for 2045C)
John E McMurry
Robert C Fay
ISBN-10: 0131993232
ISBN-13: 9780131993235
Publisher: Prentice Hall
Published: 04/13/2007
Suggested retail price: $181.33 (In Book Store-New and used)
Grading Outline for Students using McMurray 5th edition:
McMurray 5th edition: http://www.fccj.us/chm2046/46grdF08McM.htm
Exam#1
7. Covalent Bonds and Molecular Structure
23. Organic Chemistry
Exam#2
10. Liquids, Solids, and Phase Changes
11. Solutions and Their Properties
Exam#3
12. Chemical Kinetics
13. Chemical Equilibrium
Exam#4
14. Aqueous Equilibria: Acids and Bases.
15. Applications of Aqueous Equilibria
Exam#5
16. Thermodynamics: Entropy, Free Energy, and Equilibrium
17. Electrochemistry
22. Nuclear Chemistry
Instructor Requested Information:
During the first week of class, the student will fill out a 4x6 file card. The instructor has provided a sample below
with his personal data and his block scheduled time. The completion of this card is worth (2 points) toward the
student's final grade
Data Card (4x6 file card):
Front Side (Personal Data)
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Name:
Office:
Address:
John Taylor
CHM 2046C
D-270
4417 Port Arthur Road
Jacksonville, FL 32224
Telephone: 904-766-6763 (office)
Cell: 904 614-0531 Home: 904-992-2052
E-MAIL :
[email protected] or [email protected]
Employment:
FCCJ since 8/21/06
Full time chemistry faculty
Major: Instructional Technologies
Minor: Chemical Education
Long Term Goal: Educational Software Developer
Prerequisite: MAC 1105 equivalent Algebra completed: yes
Chemistry Background: CHM 2045C: yes A
Physics Background: High School Physics completed: no
Software/Computer Literacy: WP, Word, Excel, HTML, Javascript
Home Computer: yes
Internet ISP: yes or have access
Why are you taking this course? Required for chemistry major
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Data Card (4x6 file card):
Back Side (Scheduled Time Blocks)
Class/Work Schedule Summary:
Number
CHM 1020
Section
283919
CHM 1025C
Lab
ESC 1000
CHM 2046C
Lab
CHM 2211C
Lab
286714
270079
284690
286138
Room
A-171
D-207
Time
3:00-4:15 p.m.
9:00-12:00 p.m.
R
D-204
9:00-12:00 p.m.
D-207
12:00-1:15 p.m.
D-207
1:00-4:00 p.m.
D-204
1:00-4:00 p.m.
D-207
7:00-10:00 p.m.
D-204
7:00-10:00 p.m.
Days
MW
T
MW
R
T
M
W
Class/Office Matrix Schedule (Where is Your Instructor?):
My Schedule Matrix: I have 10 hours of office hours, Office/Pretest means I am in the course’s classroom, while
Office means my office D-270. You must find 10 hours in you weekly matrix for studying chemistry. Please make
your own!
Time
7:30
8:00
8:45
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
Monday
At Home
Course
Preptime
Preptime
Preptime
On the Road
On the Road
Pretest/Office
A0171
ESC 1000
A0171
Earth Science
Sect# 283919
2:30
3:00
3:30
Pretest/Office
A-171
Office: D-270
Office D-270
Office/Pretest
A-171
CHM 1020
Lecture A-171
4:00
Sect#283919
1:15
1:30
2:00
Office/Pretest
4:15
A-171
4:30
5:30
6:00 2211 Pretesting
6:30 Pretesting D-203A
7:00
7:15
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:15
10:30
CHM 2211C
Sect#286138
D-207
CHM 2210C
Lecture
D-207
Lecture
Office D-270
On the Road
On the Road
Tuesday
At Home
On the Road
On the Road
CHM 1025C
Lecture 9-10
D-TBA
Lab 10-12
D-204
Lab
Lab
Office/Pretest
D204/D270
Office/Pretest
D211
CHM 2046C
Lecture
D-211
Sect# 284690
CHM 2046C
CHM 2046C
Lecture
D-211
Office/Pretest
D-211
Office
D-270
Wednesday
At Home
Course
Preptime
Preptime
Preptime
On the Road
On the Road
Pretest/Office
A0171
ESC 1000
A-171
Earth Science
Sect# 283919
Pretest/Office
A0171
Office: D-270
Office D-270
Office/Pretest
A-171
CHM 1020
Lecture A-171
Sect#283919
Office/Pretest
A-171
On the Road
On the Road
CHM 2046C
Independent
Study
See Above
2211 Pretesting
Pretesting
D203A
CHM 2211C
Lecture
Sect#286138
Lab/Lecture
Lab Room
D-204
Lab
Office D-270
On the Road
On the Road
Thursday
At Home
On the Road
On the Road
CHM 1025C
Lecture
9-12
D207
Lecture
D207
Lecture
Office/Pretest
D207/D270
Office/Pretest
D211
CHM 2046C
Lecture
D-211/204
Sect# 284690
CHM 2046C
Lab D 204
CHM 2046C
Lab
Office/Pretest
D-211/204
Office
D-270
On the Road
On the Road
CHM 2046C
Independent
Study
See Above
Friday
Community
Service
Projects
Off Campus
or
Corporate
Computer
Training
Off Campus
or
Special
Help
Pre-testing
Sessions
as
announced
via
email
On Campus
Student’s Class/Work Matrix Schedule:
Where can you find 10 hours per week minimum to study?
Name: ___________________________ CHM 2046C Fall Term 2008
Time
7:30
8:00
8:45
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:30
11:00
11:30
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
2:10
2:30
3:00
3:30
4:00
4:30
5:00
5:30
6:00
6:30
7:15
7:30
8:00
8:30
9:00
9:30
10:00
10:15
10:30
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Submit this form the second class period
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
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