course syllabus - MU BERT

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COURSE SYLLABUS
BSC 250
Microbiology and Human Disease
Spring 2010
Instructor:
Frank L. Binder, Ph.D.
Office: S-300A
Professor of Biological Sciences
Email: [email protected]
Phone: 696-2426 (Marshall University)
522-6438 (Microbiological Consultants, Inc.)
Office Hours:
Monday, Wednesday (2:00 – 3:00pm): Tuesday (1:00-2:00pm)
Other hours by appointment
Classroom:
Lecture: S-376
1:00-2:00 pm
Lab: BBSC127
Course Description: BSC 250 Microbiology and Human Disease (4 Cr)
Introduction to microbiology with emphasis on the role of microorganisms
in the disease process. Does not count toward a major in Biological Sciences.
PR: BSC 227 or equivalent with a grade of C or better
Textbook:
1.Microbiology (A Human Perspective, 6th ed): Nester, Anderson, Robert & Nester (McGraw-Hill)
2. A Photographic Atlas for Microbiological (3rd Ed) Leboffe and Pierce
3. 20th Century Microbe Hunters, Robert Krasner
COURSE POLICIES:
1) Attendance: Your attendance is expected for each lecture and laboratory session in this course. Absence
from either lecture or laboratory will make this course especially difficult. Laboratory sessions can not
be made up due to the nature of the laboratory. You are responsible for any material missed by being
absent. Absences from exams due to illness, death in the family, or institutional activities will be
excused with the appropriate written notification to the instructor. In the case of illness, you should
provide a physician’s note stating that you could not be present during the exam period for medical
reasons. See Marshall University Undergraduate Catalogue – Academic Information for guidelines.
This policy will be strictly enforced.
2) Academic Dishonesty: Any form of academic dishonesty will not be tolerated. Refer to Undergraduate
Catalogue for definitions of cheating, falsification, bribes and complicity.
3) Students with Disabilities: The Marshall University H.E.L.P. program is committed to providing
assistance through individual tutoring, mentoring and support, as well as fair and legal access to
educational opportunities for students diagnosed with Learning Disabilities (LD) and related disorders
such as ADD/ADHD. If you have, or believe you may have, a handicap or learning disability that will
make it difficult for you to complete this course as structured, please contact the H.E.L.P. office in
Myers Hall at 696-6252 (http://www.marshall.edu/help/) . The H.E.L.P. program will assess your
situation and provide information designed to help me meet your educational needs.
4) Electronic Devices: Please turn off all cell phones, pagers, and other electronic devices when you enter
the classroom. No electronic devices will be needed, and none will be permitted, during exams. The
use or access of an electronic device during an exam will be considered academic dishonesty. Lectures
may be taped during the lecture and lab components of the course.
5) Grading Policy: Your grade for this class will be based upon your performance on 3 lecture exams and
2 laboratory exams including a non-comprehensive final exam. Each exam will be composed of
multiple choice, matching, completion, as well as problem solving and critical thinking questions.
Grading scale for this course will be: 100-90 (A), 89-80 (B), 79-65 (C), 64-50 (D), and below 50 (F).
Your grade on the final lecture exam will be counted twice if it exceeds your average going into the final
exam. In the event of illness or family death missed exams may be made up by mutual arrangement
between the professor and student.
6) Laboratory Polices:
Safety: Live bacterial cultures are used in this course, since your laboratory desk is shared with at
least 5 other students it is necessary to disinfect your work area each time you come to lab. It is also
necessary to wash your hands with any of the various antiseptics provided after finishing the
laboratory period. No eating or drinking is permitted in this laboratory. In the event of a spilled
culture, notify the instructor immediately so that the contaminated area can be treated with a
disinfectant.
Attendance: Laboratory attendance is required and it is not possible to make up missed laboratory
sessions. More than 3 unexcused absences from lab will result in lowering your grade one letter.
Two written examinations, consisting of completion, matching, multiple choice, short answer and
problem solving questions will be used to assess student performance in the laboratory.
Lecture Course Objectives – Students completing this course should:
1) Appreciate the historical contributions of Pasteur, Koch, Jenner, Erhlich, Flemming and others have
made to the field of microbiology and medicine.
2) Recognize the major groups of microorganisms comprising the microbial world including viruses,
bacteria, fungi and protozoans and algae.
3) Understand the anatomy, physiology, growth and genetic exchange mechanisms in bacteria.
4) Understand the host-parasite relationship and the role of microorganisms in the disease process.
5) Understand the basic host defense mechanism in preventing microbial diseases including non-specific
and specific immune responses.
6) Understand the immune response in cancer, organ transplantation, autoimmunity and hypersensitivity
reactions.
7) Understand the etiology and pathogenesis of selected bacterial, viral and mycotic diseases in man.
Laboratory Course Objectives – Students satisfactorily completing this laboratory component of this course
should be able to:
1) Use the bright-field microscope to observe bacteria.
2) Be able to prepare a bacterial smear and complete the Gram Stain procedure.
3) Prepare culture media and understand different methods of sterilization.
4) Enumerate bacteria using the viable plate count method.
5) Isolate and characterize Staphylococci from the nasal passage.
6) Determine the sensitivity of bacteria to antibiotics and understand the emergence of resistant bacteria.
7) Identify members of the Enterobacteriace by their biochemical profiles.
8) Estimate and characterize bacteria in selected foods.
9) Complete the microbiological tests used in testing of potable and recreational water.
10) Selective isolation of Microbial populations from soil samples (Clostridium and Bacillus)
Spring Semester 2010
BSC 250 Lab Syllabus
Microbiology and Human Disease
Week
Lecture Topic
No.
1
Orientation to the Microbiology Lab
Safety Regulations
2
Aseptic Transfer of Bacteria
Preparation of a Bacterial Smear
The Simple Stain, Bright field Microscopy
3
The Gram Stain Procedure
4
5
Dr. Frank Binder
Preparation of Culture Media
Sterilization of Culture Media and Methods of Sterilization
Culture Conditions for Bacteria
Viable Plate Count
Video: When Wonder Drugs Don’t Work (MRSA)
Isolation of Staphylococci and Streptococci from URT
6
Evaluation of Viable Plate Count
Gram Stains of Staphylococci, Streptococci, Corynebacterium
7
Evaluate Biochem. Tests to ID Staphylococci
Antibiotic Sensitivity Tests (Kirby-Bauer)
Video: Multiple Drug Resistant TB (MDRTB)
LAB EXAM I
8
9
10
Biochemical Tests used to ID Gram (-) Bacteria
Evaluation of Oral Antiseptics
Handwashing Experiment
Evaluate Biochemical Tests
Evaluate Oral Antiseptics Results
Evaluate Handwashing Experiment
11
SPRING BREAK
12
Microbiology of Water (MPN, Colilert, Membrane Filtration)
Video: Walkerton Study (E.coli 0157:H7)
Results on Water Testing
Microbiology of Food (Plate Count)
Video: E. coli (.coli 0157:H7)
Evaluate Plate Counts on Food (Gram Stains/APC)
Video: Story of Typhoid Mary
Microbial Populations in Soil (Isolation of Clostridium and Bacillus)
Isolation of Fungi from soil
Gram Stains of Bacilllus, and Clostridium from soil samples
Fungal Morphology from soil samples
13
14
15
16
Lab Exam II
FINAL EXAM
MAY 7, 2010
12:45-2:45 pm
Spring Semester 2010
BSC 250 Lecture Syllabus
Dr. Frank Binder
Microbiology and Human Disease
Week
Date
Lecture Topic
No.
1
01-11-10
Introduction to Microbial World
01-13-10
Major Groups of Microbes
01-15-10
Historical Contributions in Microbiology
2
01-18-10
NO CLASS – Martin Luther King Holiday
01-20-10
Microbe Hunters
01-22-10
The Smallpox Story (Video)
3
01-25-10
Anatomy of Bacteria
01-27-10
Bacterial Anatomy
01-29-10
Video: Killer Disease on Campus
4
02-01-10
Growth of Bacteria (Bacterial Growth Curve)
02-03-10
Genetic Exchange in Bacteria
02-05-10
Review (Catch Up)
5
02-08-10
Lecture Exam I
02-10-10
Host Parasite Relationship
02-12-10
Non-Specific Host Defenses (Phagocytosis, Inflammation)
6
02-15-10
Biology of Immune Response
02-17-10
Humoral Immunity
02-19-10
Cell Mediated Immunity
7
02-22-10
HIV/AIDS
02-24-10
Autoimmunity, Immunohematology
02-26-10
Organ Transplantation/Cancer Immunology
8
03-01-10
Video: Cancer Warrior
03-03-10
Immediate and Delayed Hypersensitivity
03-05-10
Exam II
9
03-08-10
Infections of the Respiratory Tract
03-10-10
Tuberculosis, Diphtheria, Whooping Cough
03-12-10
Streptococcal and Pneumococcal infections, Legionella
10
03-15-10
Infections in the Digestive System
03-17-10
Botulism, Staph, Clostridial food poisoning
03-19-10
Cholera, Typhoid fever, Salmonellosis infections, Shigellosis and
E.coli 0157:H7
11
03-22-10
SPRING BREAK
03-24-10
NO CLASSES
03-26-10
12
03-29-10
VIDEO: E.coli O157:H7
03-31-10
Wound and Skin Infections
04-02-10
Anthrax, Tetanus, Gas Gangrene, Staphylococcial diseases
13
04-05-10
Anthropod Diseases (Plague, Lyme Diseases, Typhus)
04-07-10
NO Class Assessment Day
04-09-10
Genitourinary Tract Infections
14
04-12-10
Gonorrhea, Syphilis, Chlamydia
04-14-10
Video: The Deadly Deception (Syphilis)
04-16-10
Introduction to Viral Diseases
15
04-19-10
Video: Influenza 1918
04-21-10
Lecture on Influenza
04-23-10
Video: Race Against Killer Flu
16
04-26-10
Viral Infection of Man:
04-28-10
Polio, Rabies, Ebola, Yellow Fever
04-30-01
VIDEO: On Trial of a Killer Virus
FINAL EXAM
FRIDAY MAY 7, 2010
12:45-2:45 pm
Text
Chapter
1
1
3
4
8, 13
17
15
16
29
18
18
22
25,32
22, 23, 24
26
26
22
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