University of Kent at Canterbury

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UNIVERSITY OF KENT – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE
MODULE SPECIFICATION TEMPLATE
1
The title of the module
UU570 ~ Civil Engineering Construction A
2
The Department which will be responsible for management of the module
Building & Civil Engineering
3
The Start Date of the Module March 2006
4
The number of students expected to take the module 15
5
Modules to be withdrawn on the introduction of this proposed module and consultation with other
relevant Departments and Faculties regarding the withdrawal
6
The level of the module Certificate (C)
7
The number of credits which the module represents 15
8
Which term(s) the module is to be taught in (or other teaching pattern) Semesters. 2
9
Prerequisite modules: Design Principles and Applications, Management Principles and
10
The programmes of study to which the module contributes
Applications
Foundation Degree in Construction, Foundation Degree in Civil Engineering, HNC Construction,
HNC Building Services Engineering, HNC Civil Engineering
11
The intended subject specific learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to
programme learning outcomes
1). Investigate the processes used in different earthworks activities
2). Investigate the different forms used of substructure and the processes involved in their
construction
3). Investigate the different forms of superstructures and the processes involved in their
construction
4). Demonstrate problem solving in construction activities using a range of case studies
These learning outcomes directly relate to the listed programme learning outcomes A1 and A5 –
Knowledge & Understanding of the Foundation Degree in Civil Engineering & HNC’s in Civil
Engineering.
12
The intended generic learning outcomes and, as appropriate, their relationship to programme
learning outcomes
The following generic learning outcomes directly relate to the listed programme learning outcomes
of the Foundation Degree in Construction & HNC’s in Construction & Building Services
Engineering
1). Locate, extract, analyse, prepare, process, interpret and present data from multiple sources including
drawn information using appropriate qualitative and quantitative techniques and packages.
2). Communicate effectively with other people using visual, graphic, written and verbal means.
3). Analyse, synthesise, evaluate and summarise information critically, including prior research Evaluate
designs, processes and products, and make improvements.
UNIVERSITY OF KENT – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE
13. A synopsis of the curriculum
 Earthworks: types, cuttings and embankments, slope stability, excavations: equipment,
effectiveness, economical, efficiency; safety, consideration, regulations, precautions, trenches;
temporary works, types, supports, timbering, de-watering
 Substructure: plant and equipment, piling systems, ground stabilisation, foundation;
drainage, culverts services
 Superstructure: plant and equipment; structures, bridges, wide span; high rise buildings,
concrete, steel; falsework/formwork, in-site, pre-cast; concrete, production, placement
 Case Studies: methods and resources, appropriateness; key considerations, inter-relationship
of safety, environmental, quality, technical and economic factors; solutions, selection, planning
and management of case study projects with regard to key considerations.
14. Indicative Reading List
-
Harris, F – Modern Construction and Ground Engineering Equipment and Methods 2 nd
Edition – (Longman, 1994)
Holmes, R – Introduction to Civil Engineering Construction 3 rd Edition (College of Estate
Management, 1995)
Tomlinson, M – Foundation Design and Construction 6th Edition – (Addison-Wesley,
1995)
Warren, D – Civil Engineering Construction – (Palgrave Macmillan, 1996)
Other publications
-
Journals such as New Civil Engineer, Construction News and Contract Journal
In addition, the ICE (Institution of Civil Engineers) Works Construction Guides are useful,
if brief, summaries of various topics which they cover
15. Learning and Teaching Methods, including the nature and number of contact hours and the total
study hours which will be expected of students, and how these relate to achievement of the intended
learning outcomes
Students will be expected to spend a total of 150 hours of study, which will be apportioned as
follows:

47 contact hours - involving a mixture of lectures, classes & tutorials. Much of the content
will be directly taught incorporating a variety of class-based activities. Case studies will be
used extensively in order to develop a working knowledge and practice of the construction
industry. The production of sketches and drawings [manually or using CAD] to enhance the
knowledge gained will be included. Learners will work both in groups and individually and
may be required to provide oral presentations from their own studies or experiences.

40 hours – assessment & revision

63 hours – private study
16. Assessment methods and how these relate to testing achievement of the intended learning outcomes
Assessment
Evidence for learning outcomes is achieved through course work assignments (50%) and end of
module examination (50%). Assessment will focus upon the individual achievement of each
learner, however group work activities will also be part of the assessment strategy. Consideration
will be given to health, safety and welfare throughout the delivery of this module.
UNIVERSITY OF KENT – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE
Subject Specific Learning Outcomes
1). Investigate the processes used in
different earthworks activities
2). Investigate the different forms used of
substructure and the processes involved
in their construction
Assessment Criteria
 Describe types of earthwork activities
 Evaluate the use of different types of
earthmoving equipment for different situations
 Explain appropriate methods and resources to
ensure safe and productive operations in
earthworks
 Describe types of temporary works and
dewatering
 Compare the use of different plant and
equipment for substructure and drainage
activities
 Compare different piling systems and ground
stabilisation techniques
 Describe the construction of different
foundations
 Describe the processes of drainage for different
situations
3). Investigate the different forms of
superstructures and the processes
involved in their construction
 Compare the use of different plant and
4). Demonstrate problem solving in
construction activities using a range of
case studies
 Analyse the appropriateness of methods and
equipment for the construction of
superstructures
 Compare the processes of construction of the
main forms of structure
 Describe the various methods of falsework and
formwork used in superstructure activities
 Explain the processes of concrete production,
delivery and placement.
resources in relevant case studies
 Explain how safety, environmental, technical
and economic factors are key considerations in
construction activities
 Produce optimal solutions to case study
problems with regard to the key considerations
Generic Learning Outcomes
1). Analyse, synthesise, evaluate and summarise
information critically, including prior
research Evaluate designs, processes and
products, and make improvements.

Appraise and compare a range of situations
effectively to take into account all possible
circumstances
2). Communicate effectively with other people
using visual, graphic, written and verbal
means.

Include drawings clearly annotated to show
key components, functions etc.
Provide brief specifications where required to
describe materials and quality
Provide written text coherently using
appropriate technical language


3). Locate, extract, analyse, prepare, process,
interpret and present data from multiple
sources including drawn information using
appropriate qualitative and quantitative
techniques and packages.


Extract and analyse research information from
class texts, published accounts and on line
sources.
Select information that is specifically applied
to the brief and objective(s)
UNIVERSITY OF KENT – CODE OF PRACTICE FOR QUALITY ASSURANCE

17
Write accounts of selected key points from
researched information using own text, style
and structure.
Implications for learning resources, including staff, library, IT and space.
This module will be taught by appropriately qualified lecturers who have experience in delivering
these topics.
All the items stated in the Indicative Reading List are available at the Horsted Centre, Learning
Resource Centre IT suites which all allow Internet, On-line T.I. Onestop Technical Index Facility
are also available for students to book as required. In addition the Department boasts its own
IT/AutoCAD suite which is incorporated in the programme operation. The teaching
accommodation is adapted for teaching Construction classes.
18
A statement confirming that, as far as can be reasonably anticipated, the curriculum, learning and
teaching methods and forms of assessment do not present any non-justifiable disadvantage to
students with disabilities
The learning outcomes, teaching and learning methods and assessments are accessible to and
achievable by all students. Any student with disabilities will not face any foreseen disadvantage or
difficulties that cannot be reasonably addressed.
Statement by the Director of Learning and Teaching: "I confirm I have been consulted on the above
module proposal and have given advice on the correct procedures and required content of module
proposals"
................................................................
Director of Learning and Teaching
..............................................
Date
Statement by the Head of Department: "I confirm that the Department has approved the introduction of
the module and will be responsible for its resourcing"
.................................................................
Head of Department
..............................................
Date
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