Accelerating Opportunity Year One Findings

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http://www.lctcs.edu/workready u/accelerating-opportunity

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTEGRATED BASIC SKILLS PATHWAYS

April 29 30, 2014 • Bellevue, WA

MAJOR PROGRESS MADE IN FIRST YEAR OF AO

Theresa Anderson & Lauren Eyster The Urban Institute April 30, 2014 URBAN INSTITUTE 2

States & Colleges Primarily Focused on Building AO Pathways during First Year • • • • Building pathways takes a lot of time & energy Enrollment increased by 3 semester rd Almost all colleges developed 2+ pathways in first year Many colleges developed 3+ pathways https://encrypted tbn2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRaEtf_YkEfD40bJHG4dyL W7o2ZK1c8I5tNCbr4Oc6YzOxjp4Wfjg URBAN INSTITUTE 3

Pathways Active in Each Semester of the First Year of Implementation 120 100 80 60 40 20

55 52 101 112

0 Semester 1 Semester 2 Semester 3 Unique Pathways For IL, KS, KY, & NC, the first semester was Spring 2012; for LA, the first semester was Fall 2012.

Source: AO College Survey.

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Many AO Students Expressed Satisfaction with Their Pathway Program • Positive description of pathways in focus groups • Many students plan to continue higher education • Strong “word of mouth” recruitment https://ahc-assets-website wsp.s3.amazonaws.com/styles/large/s3/pretty%20happy%20women% 20ethnic.jpg?itok=r7egVsmN URBAN INSTITUTE 5

Institutional Factors Played Important Role in Selection of AO Pathways • In selecting pathways, colleges considered: – Labor market demand – Cooperative CTE departments – CTE eligibility requirements – Pathways structures already in place – Student demand/interest URBAN INSTITUTE http://timemanagementninja.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Which path.jpg

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Pathways Active in First Year of Implementation, by Industry Area URBAN INSTITUTE Source: AO College Survey.

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Attitudes Toward & Opportunities for Adult Education Students Beginning to Change • Faculty, staff, & students expressed willingness to open doors for adult education students • AO students from adult ed. started to identify as college students http://drprem.com/life/wp content/uploads/sites/5/2013/07/159301709.jpg

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Instructors Used Mix of Team Teaching Approaches for AO Pathways • • • 88% of colleges implemented team teaching of some kind Parity between teachers was not always achieved Increasing buy-in for AO & team teaching among CTE faculty & staff is a major priority http://bornstoryteller.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/team_teaching.png

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Team Teaching Approaches, First Year of Implementation Complementary-Supportive

89%

Monitoring Teacher

76%

Traditional

59%

Collaborative

43%

Differentiated Split Class

24%

Parallel Instruction

8%

0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% N=37, Source: AO College Survey URBAN INSTITUTE 10

Consistent & Comprehensive Network of Support Services – Still a Work-in-Progress • • • • Students had access to academic support services at the college Most AO programs had coordinators, coaches, & navigators • Some colleges reached out to partners to provide services Some college staff & students were not aware of services available to students Strengthening support services is an important policy lever for all states URBAN INSTITUTE http://www.communitypartnersnh.org/wp content/themes/nautilius/images/CommunitySupportServices.jpg

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Selected Support Services Offered to AO Students, First Year of Implementation 40 35 30 25 20 15 10 5 0

42 18 11 41 16 15 39 12 13 21 7 0 12 3 0

URBAN INSTITUTE Tutoring or other academic support College navigation support Career planning Transpor tation Child care Source: AO College Survey 12

Loss of Ability to Benefit Caused Major Shift in Most Colleges’ Recruitment Strategies • • • Shifted recruitment towards students with a high school credential & basic skill needs 60% of AO students had a high school credential at enrollment – 21% came from existing CTE programs Decreased focus on adult ed. students who may have difficulty ever accessing college http://www.straighterline.com/wp/wp content/uploads/image-archive/pell-grants.jpg

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Recruitment Sources by State, First Year of Implementation 100%

13%

90% 80%

42% 41% 39% 46%

70%

63%

60%

6% 3%

50%

21% 20% 85%

40%

43%

30%

7% 6% 24% 50%

20% 10%

28% 30% 3% 12% 11%

0% All (N=2,588) IL (N=419) KS (N=1,001) KY (N=499) LA (N=451) NC (N=218) External Internal - Other Internal - CTE Internal - Dev. Ed.

Internal - Adult Ed.

Source: AO College Survey URBAN INSTITUTE 14

Engagement of Workforce Partners Stronger than Employer Engagement • • • • Colleges engaged workforce agencies & local CBOs Some states created state-level partnerships with the workforce system Partnerships with employers were still being formed & strengthened Formed internal partnerships to facilitate the implementation of AO & gain buy-in http://www.canopy.org/media/advisory-board.jpg

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Most Common External Partnerships, First Year of Implementation Workforce investment system organization

37

Community-based organization

33

Employer

24

Community college district administrative office

22

Other community college

17

Industry association

10

0 10 20 30

Number of Colleges

40 Source: AO College Survey URBAN INSTITUTE 16

While First-Year Costs Varied, Most Resources Went to Staffing • • • Resources primarily went toward personnel Costs rose by number of pathways offered & students served • State & college staff acknowledged the cost & effort of start-up Expect to realize economies of scale as implementation progresses http://www.mikesroadtrip.com/wp content/uploads/2013/09/investment-growth.jpg

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Components of AO Costs, First Year of Implementation Person nel 91% Courses 3% Tuition/ Scholar ships Support Services Adver tising 4% 0.4% 0.9% Source: AO College Survey.

Consul tants 0.1% Other 0.6% URBAN INSTITUTE 18

States Supported AO Implementation; Built on Existing Infrastructure & Relationships • All states had experience with career pathway initiatives • States integrated AO with statewide goals to increase postsecondary degree completion https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/eihd/images/navajo.jpg

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State Progress on Policy Levers, First Year of Implementation IL KS KY LA NC Curricular Alignment ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ New Funding Models Data Improvement Performance-based deadline changes P-20 (existing) Tiered Tuition waivers Merge with Dept. of Children & Families P-20 (existing) Movement into Banner, expansion of P-20 Systemic overhaul Source: Site visits & program documents .

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States Engaged in Policy Change; Still Addressing Challenges • • • • Worked toward policy change to support AO sustainability & scalability Challenged by budget constraints Leveraged AO to decision-makers in policy review to improve opportunities for low-skilled adults State offices offered technical assistance, professional development, & AO oversight http://wlsappeals.com/wp content/uploads/2012/11/iStock_000017765581Small.jpg

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State Technical Assistance and Professional Development, First Year of Implementation IL KS KY LA NC Pathway Develop ment ✔ ✔ ✔ ✔ Recruitment /Outreach Strategies ✔ ✔ ✔ Professional Develop ment Regional State-wide State-wide Labor Market Information ✔ ✔ ✔ State-wide & regional ✔ ✔ In progress Source: Site visits & program documents.

Surveys on College AO Needs ✔ ✔ ✔ (2) URBAN INSTITUTE 22

ALL IL KS KY LA NC The Year in Review… Credentials Awarded 2,641 581 1,190 449 369 52 Credits Awarded 13,382.5

4,221 4,802.5

2,063 1,629 667 Source: AO College Survey.

Students Enrolled 2,588 419 1,001 499 451 218 URBAN INSTITUTE 23

Next Steps in the Evaluation

May 2014 1 st Year Implemen tation Report Late 2014 2 nd Year Implemen tation Report

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Late 2014 Year 3 College Survey Late 2014/ Early 2015 Report on Early Impact Findings 2016 Final Reports

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Questions?

Theresa Anderson AO Evaluation Project Manager The Urban Institute [email protected]

Lauren Eyster AO Evaluation Project Director The Urban Institute [email protected]

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NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTEGRATED BASIC SKILLS PATHWAYS

April 29 30, 2014 • Bellevue, WA

New Funding for AO-K

From the Department for Children and Families: 

Up to $1.7million during FY 14

From Legislature: 

$500,000 for use in AO-K Programs (Proviso to SB155)

$1,900,000 GED Accelerator (incentive for GEDs and CTE certificate)

Scaling Accelerating Opportunity in IL

 

Transitions Academy

  An intensive one year project    Application process Funded by Adult Education and Career and Technical Education Face to face meetings, online courses, webinars, assignments, transitions blog, google group, mentors assigned, and a final presentation Two-day Workshop   Day one is for the academy participants Day two is open to the entire state

Expansion to 18 colleges

 FY2015 adding 4-6 colleges

Louisiana’s New Attitude

• • • • • • • • 4 th Anniversary of WorkReady U in July Comprehensive Approach to Adult Ed.

Focus on the Undereducated and Underemployed AE Scaled from 1 College to ALL 13 Adult Learner Stereotypes Shattered Partnership Network Aligned Biggest AO Skeptics Embraced & Utilized AO Scaled from 9 Colleges to ALL 13

Scaling & Sustaining

AOKY is Statewide!

Recruitment is Everybody

s Business

Team Teaching is an Equal Partnership

Next Frontier: AOKY 2.0

A-OK 2012 2014

Communicating the Success

   

Transition Newsletter

 Highlights a program  Events

Presentations:

 Board Meetings   Community College Presidents Council Community College Trustees Association    Community College Faculty Chief Academic Officers CTE/Perkins   P-20 Council IL Longitudinal Data System Committee  Adult Education Program Directors

AO Report - Compendium IL AO Video Black Hawk College- 1 st AO Cohort Illinois Community College Board Meeting

The Opportunity to be Part of the Solution

Louisiana’s Economic and Moral Imperative

• • • • • 1 in 5 working aged citizens do NOT possess a HSE The Skills Gap is widening – PIACC Report Federal Financial Aid Guidelines – Barrier to Success LA workforce needs are exploding 

LWC projected increase of demand for workers = 236,000 through 2020

LWC projected more than 621,000 new job opening through 2020

Postsecondary Education in LA is changing – Wise Funding

Using Data to Demonstrate Success

Comparison of AO students & first time students: Spring 2012- Fall 2013

AO Students Comparison Group Students Enrolled Number of students who earned a KCTCS credential(s) Number 1,343 684 Percent 50.9% Number 10,743 923 Percent 8.59% Number of credentials earned by students Licenses and industry recognized credentials earned Number of students who enrolled in subsequent term 863 177 978 72.82% 1,827 230 7,405 68.93%

NATIONAL CONFERENCE ON INTEGRATED BASIC SKILLS PATHWAYS

April 29 30, 2014 • Bellevue, WA

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