State College News Frosh Beat Juniors IV No. 6

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State College News
NEW
YORK
S T A T E COLLEGE FOR
ESTABLISHED HY THE CLASS OF
VOL.
IV
No. 6
ALBANY, N. Y.,
Frosh Beat Juniors
First Inter-Class Game—28 to 23
The Freshman-Junior game, '.he
first iiiterclass basketball game of
ilie season, went lo the Freshmen
by a score of 28 to 2,1. Il was one
ill' the best games ever played on
the Slate College courl. The issue
iv.is in doubl right up to the last
millutc of play, and the Juniors
were still lighting hard to overcome the S-poinl Icul nf the fresh
men when the final whistle blew.
llaihcirn starleil the scoring for
the Juniors from the foul line, 'flic
freshmen soon Weill into the lead,
however, and remained in llie front
until llie end nf tilt- half, when the
score stood 16 to 15 in their favor.
'fbe Juniors started mil strong
again in llie second half, but llie
freshmen came through with live
field goals to the Juniors' three,
pulling them in the lead at the end
of i In- half.
The playing nf Johnson and
Stewart, llie forwards for the
freshmen, was the main feature of
the game. Johnson found the basket
six times and Stewart five limes,
Stewart's shooting was spectacular,
i 'I hrcu of his baskets wen- made
| front the middle of the lloor, They
are a speedy pair and, probabjy,
will be candidates fur llie Varsity
I in the places of Harry and fitzI gerald, the star forwards on last
.'year's team,
I The Juniors, although they lost
!
llie contest, played a line brand of
| basketball, They were in lb.: game
from start in finish, Casscvan: and
I latlioni did all the scoring, They
each made four field baskets and
I lalboru pin in six free throw s, li
was due to the greater accuracy in
.•diddling on the pari of the fresh
men ami not to lack of team work
i.i.il the Juniors lost,
The game was on the whole
clean and fast. There were quite a
irw finds, due to the fact that this
is the first game and the men have
not gotten over the bad habits acquired in practice scrimmages, I'm
the contest was not won by foul
shooting. It was field baskets that
counted.
Continued on page 4
J U D G E TRACY SUCCEEDS
R. O. T . C. T O B E R E - I N -
DR. FINEGAN
STITUTED IN COLLEGES
Appointment Made Last Friday
Announcement Made by Secretary
of War Baker
James Francis Tracey, of the
linn of Tracey, Cooper and
Tow n send, was appointed last
Friday by the State University a
member of the Board of Trustees
of Slate College to succeed Dr.
Thomas E, Fiuegan, who resigned
when he became Commissioner of
Education of Pennsylvania,
Judge Tracey is a graduate of
Georgetown University and of the
.Albany I.aw School.
He was
granted llie degree of LI,. D. by
Georgetown University in 1910,
lie has practised law in Albany
since 1875; lectured on the law of
corporations
al
Albany
Law
School from 1890 to 1905, and
served as associate justice nf the
Supreme Court of the Philippine
Islands from 1905-1909.
Judge Tracey is a member of the
Fort Orange Club, University Club
and Country Club of .Albany, the
University and the Catholic clubs
in \'cw York City, and the University Club of .Manila, I'. I.
'fhe new regulations of llie War
Department for the Reserve O(licers' Training Corps to be re-instituted this fall in colleges- and
schools of the country were announced by Secretary of War
Maker in an address al the opening exercises of Lehigh University,
at which President Henry Sturgis
Drinker presided.
Secretary linker said that "the
Government will, to institutions
forming training units of al least
100 members, furnish an officer to
act as Professor of Military
Science and Tactics, with such assistants as may be necessary, and
al! llie requisite uniforms, anus
and equipment. Students who attend the summer camps will, in
addition, be provided with quarters
and sustenance irw of cost and
transportation from and to their
homes."
'flu- military training
"asked during the year has been
Continued on page 4
CHEMISTRY CLUB
DR, BRUBACHER ENTERTAINS
Dr. Brubachcr and principals of
the normal schools in the State
crave a dinner in the Hampton last
Thursday evening in honor of
George XI. Wiley, assistant commissioner of elementary education.
There will he a meeting of the
Chemistry Club Friday, Oclober
24, at 4:10. Elton Hakes, '21, will
give an interesting talk on his experience in llie Chemical Warfare
Division.
All the old members
should be present to vole on new
members and discuss initiation
plans.
TEACHERS
1918
OCTOBER 23,
1919
$2.00 PER YEAR
FRESHMEN
ANNUAL CONVOCATION
OF UNIVERSITY
Approved by Myskania and Accepted by Student Body
Lansing Defends League of
Nations
Two rules were dropped; rule 13,
which read: " No men nf the
Freshman Class are to be allowed
lo indulge in any form of tobacco
on llie college grounds; and rule
17: " Freshmen are compelled to
run any errands that a Myskania
nieiii'ber, any class officer or any
member of llie Penally Committee
requires on penalty day."
The following are Sophomore
rules:
1. " \ o Freshman may use the
main entrance facing mi Western
avenue, al any lime. \'o culling
across l hi- campus will be allowed.
2. " No Freshman will be allowed
lo occupy the benches in the
rotunda around Minerva lest they
desecrate Minerva.
3. "Any Sophomore may deprive
any Freshman of any seal in any
corridor at tin- request nf the said
Sophomore.
4. "All Freshmen must greet all
members of the Penalty Committee
al all times.
5. " No Freshman girl may wear
her hair down her back.
fi. " Xo men of the Freshman
Continued on page 3
'fbe joint conference of the University of the Slate of Mew York
with the Slate Industrial Commission on Child Welfare was held in
connection with the annual convocation of the University at Chancellor's flail, Thursday, Friday and
Saturday morning, October lfi-1718. 'fhe. legislative program, intending to further the education of
children who leave school to go
into industrial work, was presented
by various speakers on Labor,
Child Welfare and the Health Department, 'fhe chief feature was
Secretary
of Stale
Lansing's
speech on tin- League of Nations
and the action of the Regents in
conferring upon him the honorary
degree of Doctor of Laws
Friday morning was given over
to the discussion of the " Child in
Industry " from various viewpoints.
Regent Abram I. Ellens, former
Ambassador in Turkey, presided
at this session.
'fhe discussion
was carried on by croups of speakers representing llie Xew YorkStale Federation of Labor, tinChild Welfare Organization, and
the Health Department.
James M. Lynch, of the. State Industrial Commission, presided at
the Friday afternoon session. The
general subject was "Continuation
Continued on page 4
CHANGES IN RULES FOR
SENIOR - SOPHOMORE
GAME TO-MORROW
NIGHT — 5 :00 O'CLOCK —
GYM.
QUARTERLY BOARD
COMPETITION
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Mrs. Kelly Opens Membership
Drive for Consumers' League
Rules Governing Membership
The "Slate College Quarterly"
announces that a competition for
membership for the year 1920-21
has begun — open lo Juniors,
Sophomores and freshmen.
It is
desired that students trying out
shall be members ni Press Club.
According to the new constitution
election to the Hoard is based entirely on corn-petition, as may be
seen:
"2. The Publication Hoard shall
consist of an Editor-in-Chief, five
Assistant Editors, a Business
Manager, and Iwn Advertising
Managers.
"a. The duties of llie Assistant
Editors are lo be outlined by the
Editor-in-Chief.
" b. The
Editor-in-Chief
and
Business Manager shall be members of the Senior Class.
" Election lo the Hoard, except
in the cise of candidates for Business Managership shall be determined by the number and quality
of I be published contributions of
each candidate, and service rendered.
".3. The Editor-in-Chief shall
prepare a record of contributions
and report this to the Board at
their annual election in the spring
of each year, with his nominations
of new members based upon this
record. From this lisi of nominaContinucd on page 3
Mrs. Florence Kelly, General
Secretary of the National Consumers' League, spoke to the student body Friday morning in interest of the drive for membership
being conducted by the local chapter, of which Marjorie Edgarlon,
'20, is President.
She sketched
briefly the origin of the organization, its purpose, and what it aims
to accomplish.
Airs. Kelly stated that there were
400,000 boys and girls between the
ages of fourteen and sixteen working in the Stale of Xew York
whose education had gone no
further than the eighth grade, and
that there were, in 1918, 51,000
children 'below the age of sixteen
given working papers. ft was lo
stir llie intelligence of people to
such facts, and many others equally
startling, that the Consumers'
League was founded. Their appeal is to the fortunate student
who lives off the product of I he
labor of less fortunate young people w'ithbirt knowing something of
that product. -Consumers' League
would make people realize working
conditions — make them realize for
instance that coat pressors are
poisoned by small but continuous
doses of corbon dioxid, aiul that
poison by chlorine gas is frequent
with those who work in cotton
mills. Mrs, Kelly said it was the
Continued on page 4
Page 2
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 23, 1919
State College RODS
Vol, IV
O C T , 23, 1919
No. 6
Published weekly, on Thursdays,
during the college year, by the Student Body of the N e w York State
College lor Teachers, at Albany,
New York.
T h e subscription rate is t w o dollars per year. Advertising rates
m a y be had on application to the
Business manager.
Articles, manuscripts, etc., must be
in the hands of the Editor before
S a t u r d a y of the w e e k preceding
publication,
Editor-in-chief,
K e n n e t h P . H o l b c n , '20
Managing Editor,
Elsie W. H a n b u r y , ' 2 0
Business M a n a g e r ,
Ellen C. D o n a h u e , '20
Subscription M a n a g e r ,
B e r t h a W e s t , '20
Assistant Business Manager,
E d n a L o w e r r e e , '21
Associate E d i t o r s ,
F. Reginald B r u c e , '21
Florence S t a n b r o , '21
M a r y E. W h i s h , '21
Marjoric P o t t e r , '21
Louise P e r s o n s , '22
Elisa Rigouard, '22
SENIORS
T h i s article is entitled " Seniors,"
but it is meant to appeal to all
S t a l e College s t u d e n t s .
In last week's issue of the
" N e w s , " and also in ibis number,
are
articles
concerning
credit
e a r n e d by practice t e a c h e r s .
The
g e n e r a l conclusion of Seniors now
t e a c h i n g seems to be t h a t at least
o n e credit should be given for each
h o u r of actual class work, as in all
oilier courses.
T h e " Xews " is the medium for
the expression of s t u d e n t opinion
and we wish more S e n i o r s would
give us their ideas in regard to this
m a t t e r for publication.
11 is only
t h r o u g h concerted action t h a t res u l t s are obtained, and it is for the
p r e s e n t practice t e a c h e r s that these
results should provide,
It is for
the benefit of us all to a t t e m p t to
secure m o r e pay for " our jobs,"
T h e l a b o r i n g world at large these
clays seems to be w a k i n g tip to the
value of it's p r o d u c t s ,
VVe are
l a b o r e r s — physical, mental, and
m o r a l — a n d we want m o r e pay!
A COMMENT
W e heard it in the halls last Frid a y m o r n i n g after a s s e m b l y ; the
spirit of the girls of 1923, perfectly
free a n d unbounded, implicitly expressive of the new liberty of
w o m e n in our schools and colleges,
t h i s spirit plus that of the new
girls of last year c o m p a r e d with
t h e former docility of S t a t e College
co-eds.
fn 1918 was 'begun a scries of
a f t e r n o o n lectures on conduct —
t h o u g h t and a c t i o n — w h i c h were
p u r p o s e d at enlivening the minds
of F r e s h m e n to the a c t u a l i t y of the
g a p b e t w e e n high school enthusia s m and college p r o p r i e t y .
VVe
w i t n e s s the results. O h , 1940!
DO YOU WANT A COLLEGE ORCHESTRA?
C o n s i d e r what it will mean to
y o u , as a s t u d e n t of S t a t e College.
T h i n k how it will add to the inip r e s s i v e n e s s of the chapel exercises on M o v i n g - U p D a y . Surely
iio o n e will object to a good live
o r c h e s t r a for- the c a m p u s dances.
A f t e r a little time t h e r e will be no
n e c e s s i t y of having an outside
o r c h e s t r a for c o n c e r t s , informal
dances and plays.
You who love
good music will a p p r e c i a t e having
a n u m b e r of i n s t r u m e n t s to play
for the dancing after State defeats
Colgate.
What is to keep us from having
one?
Certainly it is not talent.
But ah •orchestra d o c s lake money,
and here is y o u r chance to help.
The J u n i o r Class has arranged a
concert to raise funds for a College, o r c h e s t r a . On the evening of
November
17 the Fisk Jubilee
Singers will give a concert of well
known folk-songs a t Chancellor's
Hall.
W a t c h for the sale of
tickets.
CREDITS FOR PRACTICE
TEACHING
NEWMAN CLUB
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T o the Editor of ithe " X e w s : "
In last week's issue of the
" News " was published an article
entitled
"Credit
and
Practice
Teaching."
It so aptly expressed
my conclusions that a repetition of
its statistics does not seem necessary. Any Senior who is leaching
now is rapidly b e c o m i n g one of
those " h e c t i c s h a d o w s " who have
heretofore disgraced our profession. ^ And can you wonder at it?
Practice leaching is some j o b ! As
the victim of last week's article
staled, at least eleven hours a week
are put in on that one course,
Education 1.1. VVe always thought
we earned the credits given for
oilier College courses, especially in
the Science D e p a r t m e n t , win re so
much lime has to be pul in, but if
one's time counts for a n y t h i n g this
required course of the Senior year
should receive at least one hour's
credit for each hour spent in actual
teaching.
Even five h o u r s credit
Would ibe little enough in consideration of the work done.
Let's howl, Seniors, a l t o g e t h e r !
That one credit (or m o r e l thai we
earn and deserve, and which many
of us may require for graduation,
may not he so hard to gel if we go
after it together, and all at once.
A n o t h e r Victim,
"Y"
HOUSE
T h i n g s have s t a r t e d off with a
grand rush at the " V."
Nightly
sings, to say n o t h i n g of " g e t tog e t h e r s , " are the leading fashion
al present, while week-end parties
and e n t e r t a i n m e n t s have begun in
earnest.
One big event occurred ibis
week! T h e " Y " was g r e a t l y excited and made h a p p y by a new
part necessary to every " d o r m " —
a telephone which b e a r s the l a b e l West .3.353!
On Friday e v e n i n g D o r o t h y Hull,
'23, took dinner with M a r y Allen,
'23.
T h e following g i r l s spent the
week-end al their h o m e s :
Mary
Allen with D o r o t h y Bull as her
guest, Rlsa Miller and her guest
Ruth Callison, C h a r l o t t e Benedict,
and Beatrice llaswell.
" Dot " Plenn, '22, spent Saturday at W a l e r v l i e t with her grandmother.
A m o n g the girls w h o took some
Italian child reu fin a hike to Kenwood on S a t u r d a y afternoon were
Marion
Moore
and
Charlotte
Lvnch.
W e are s o r r y to rcporl that
Betty Makin, '2n, u n d e r w e n t an
operation on her foot S a t u r d a y
morning.
We hope ito see Betty
around a"ain soon.
Frances and K a t h e r i n c Roland,
of the Class of '19, were entertained by Helen Rcitz, '2(1, on
Saturday.
T h e " Y " was delighted to have
as its guest on S u n d a y Miss Alice
Hoyt and Miss Gladys Bryson,
Y. VV. C. A. Student S e c r e t a r i e s in
the North Eastern field.
T h e first q u a r t e r l y coinnuiuioii
a t t e n d e d in a b o d y by the Newman
Cluih, Sunday, O c t o b e r 19, followed
by breakfast in the cafeteria, was
an o v e r w h e l m i n g success.
The
way in which the m e m b e r s turned
out, aibout eighty-live being prescut, s p e a k s well for the spirit of
the society.
T h a i the Freshmen,
loo, have caught the spirit was
s h o w n by their a t t e n d a n c e ,
After
the pleasant breakfast at the cafeleria, F a t h e r Dtinney snoke a few
w o r k s to the club, c o n g r a t u l a t i n g
it upon flic success of ibis, their"
first q u a r t e r l y c o m m u n i o n ,
The
president, G e o r g e Schiavone, cxtended a cordial welcome to the
Freshmen members.
f a t h e r D'unncy entertained the
men of Newman Club last T h u r s day evening at a s m o k e r .
It is to
be hoped that this was but 'the first
of a series of similar events.
A m o n g those present were Father
Dudd of Niagara University, Mr.
Dcyo, McMahoii, '2(1; Schiavone,
'20; O'Brien, '20; Kaag, '2.3; Sherlock, 2 1 ; S t e w a r t , 2?>, and Castellano, '20.
Don't forget the hike Saturday,
O c t o b e r 25. VVe will start at 1:30.
Watch
the bulletin
board
for
further a n n o u n c e m e n t s .
1923
We f r e s h m e n hope thai Mys
kania and o t h e r upperclassmeii will
not think ill of us for refusing to
wear the caps and pins which the
Sophs so graciously presented to
us.
We waul to a s s u r e you thai
we are not lacking a bit, when it
comes lo school spirit; the reason
for our rebellion should be laid
more to the fact thai we are full
of " p e p . "
We weie not aware of
the fact thai the w e a r i n g of caps
and pins was a rule of the College,
and not of the S o p h s only.
Our
i n t e n t i o n s were lo " g e t one over
on the S o p h s , " and we certainly remain u n c h a n g e d in those intentions. W e ' r e g o i n g to keep up our
" g i n g e r and p e p " and show State
College that she should indeed be
proud of '2,3.
SOPHS HAZE FROSH
In last week's " N e w s " '2.3 informed the S o p h s (hat they were
not " p e a c e f u l little c h e r u b s wdth
s p r o u t i n g wings," despite the fact
that they were the " Peace Class."
'file cartoon on the bulletin board,
a gift of '22, clearly showed that
the S o p h s were well a w a r e of that
fact.
In that same editorial, the
F r e s h m e n tell '22 that "pacifists
are b l o o d t h i r s t y ruffians
beside
you," and following Ibis, boldly
send an ultimatum to the Sophs,
defying every rule in the Prosh
bible.
Hi consequence, the girls
a t t e m p t e d to e n t e r chapel Friday
m o r n i n g with wide bows on their
hair.
Much to their surprise, they
found that '22 slood g u a r d at every
e n t r a n c e , and before '23 reached
their chapel seats they found themselves m i n u s ribbons, bands, barrets, combs, and hairpins,
'22
showed them that just 'as soon as
they were ready to break the rules
she was right there to enforce
them.
T h e r e followed cheers for
the S o p h s and cheers for t h e Frosh.
T h i s little incident afforded much
fun for the Seniors and J u n i o r s .
^ T h e n after defying every rule the
Frosh lost courage when Myskania
entered, and stood up with 'the rest
of t h e College.
L a t e r when the
rules for F r e s h m e n were explained
by M y s k a n i a to consist of two
p a r t s , (hose lo be enforced by
S o p h m o r e s and the o t h e r s College
traditions, '2.3 ^showed its pep by
u n a n i m o u s l y rising with the rest
of the s t u d e n t b o d y in voicing its
a p p r o v a l of the distinction.
SPANISH CLUB
Spanish Club held its second
m e e t i n g on W e d n e s d a y , O c t o b e r
22.
After (he regular business
(which included the adoption of the
new c o n s t i t u t i o n ) , the time was
taken up by flic playing of Spanish
r e c o r d s on the Victrola, and a song,
" Sol)re las 01(13," which was s u n g
by Miss Florence Slltbbs, while
two of the m e m b e r s , in Spanish
c o s t u m e , danced in lime to the accompaniment.
A " brand n e w " feature of the
m e e t i n g was a series of c h a r a d e s
which had been p r e p a r e d for the
occasion.
At lirsl glance these appeared (o be (he m o s t h e t e r o g e n c
oils collection of letters,
figures,
and pictures I hat could ever be devised, but, g r a d u a l l y , after much
c h e w i n g of pencils and r a c k i n g of
brains, light began to dawn on the
puzzled c o m p a n y , and out "i* this
q u e e r - l o o k i n g collection there began to evolve old, familiar Spanish
w o r d s , which really made sense
w h e n you read t h e m c o r r e c t l y !
We are p l a n n i n g to do s o m e t h i n g
of this sort on a bigger scale later
on, by m a k i n g use of tableaux in
r e p r e s e n t i n g Spanish proverbs.
Oh, we're g o i n g lo do " lots of
t h i n g s " this year, and we want
e v e r y o n e w h o is interested lo come
lo our m e e t i n g s !
O u r next mooting will probably
be an e v e n i n g m e e t i n g and will beheld in the College gym.
Watch
t h e bulletin b o a r d for the Spanish
sefiorila w h o will tell von all about
il!
~L-
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HOME ECONOMICS
F l m c t l a Van Dcloo, who teaches
at L a w r e n c e , L. I., was a visitor
at the d e p a r t m e n t .
G r a c e H u n t , '19, teaching at
W e s t ford, N. V., visited Stale College M o n d a y , O c t o b e r 13.
E d i t h Burleigh, '17, was recently
married.
Virginia Ray, '17, was
h e r ibridesmaid.
Genevieve l l a g e m a n , '16, head of
H o m e E c o n o m i c s w o r k at Schoharie S t a t e School of A g r i c u l t u r e ,
spent the week-end at College.
Beiilah H u n t , '19, is at her h o m e
in M i l b r o o k , N. Y.
Y. W. RECITAL
_ A g u i t a r recital by Mr. J o h n s o n
C. Bane was given under the
a u s p i c e s of Y. W . C. A. in the College A u d i t o r i u m , Friday, O c t o b e r
17, at four o'clock.
Miss A g n e s
Nolan gave t w o readings, "'flicL a d y from the W e s t " and " T h e
B o o g y Man Will Catch Y o u . " Mr.
Bane is a g u i t a r soloist and comp o s e r of no little note. T h e foll o w i n g is the p r o g r a m :
1. ( a ) O v e r t u r e
(l>) " Valse B r i l l i a n t e "
Bane
(c) Concerto
1. (a) " Cavaliera R u s t i c a n a "
Mascagni
Ob) " S c h e r z o "
Bane
(c) " S p a n i s h S e r e n a d e ' '
Moskowiski
(d) " Tarantella "
Bane
3 (a) " O p e r a t i c "
Verdi
Ob) " N o c t u r n e No. 2 "
Bane
(c) " I n d i a n S o n g "
Bane
(d) " S o u t h e r n F a n c i e s " Foster
4. Ca) " I m p r o m p t u "
Bane
Ob) " M i a Dolcia G a v o t t e " Banc
fc) " M e l o d i e s "
( d ) " M a r c h Militaire "
Bane
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STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 2.1 1919
CAROLYN LANSING
HOSTESS
1921
At a well-attended m e e t i n g last j
T u e s d a y at three o'clock the J u n i o r
The first r e g u l a r m e e t i n g of the
Class gol plans well under w a y for
Eastern New York Branch of the
making the concert of the. J u b i l e e
Collegiate A l u m n a e
Association
Singers from h'iske University a
look place last S a t u r d a y afternoon
huge financial and educational sucat 3 o'clock in the h o m e of the
cess. T h e concert, which will take
president, Mrs. Edwin S. H a r r i s , 27
place M o n d a y evening, N o v e m b e r
South M a n n i n g boulevard.
The
17, at Chancellor's Mall, Education
speaker for t h e afternoon was
Building, will he for the bencul of
Senator H e n r y M. Sage.
The
a fund for the College o r c h e s t r a ,
members of the Executive ComIvathryn Mall, president of the
mittee were h o s t e s s e s , a m o n g them
class, appointed several c o m m i t t e e s
Carolyn Lansing, w h o secured her
lo lake care of tlic publicity and
Master's D e g r e e at Slate College
advertising.
T h e Publicity Comlast June.
m u t e r is in charge of J a m e s W.
Httcci, chairman,
Ralph
BakerPERSONAL
T h o m a s Bentlcy, Mabel W h i t e and
Wilhclmina I.cwin.
The Poster
Committee includes Esther C r a m e r ,
Mabel II. Ilalliday, '18, was marchairman,
Edith
Wcathcrwax,
ried lo Nathan S. P a r s o n s , SaturEunice Myers and M o n a W o o d .
day, O c t o b e r II, at her h o m e in
Valley Palis,
Helen b a y , '19, and
Nominations for m a n a g e r of
Raymond G r e e n w o o d of Albany
girls' athletics were made and
were a m o n g t h e a t t e n d a n t s ,
those nominated were M a r g a r e t
Crane, Jessie Darling and Gladys
.Arthur C, M a r o n e y , formerly diTeclsel.
T h e nominees for Colreeior of physical education and
lege song leader were Mary Whisli
basketball coach of Stale College,
was in town last S a t u r d a y .
and Marjorie Potter.
Elections
Mr.
will take place at the next meeting.
Maroney is now localed at Englewood, \ . J.
The J u n i o r Class unanimously
The " N e w s " board is glad to
voted that the Student T a x be j
have Ellen D o n o h u c , '2(1, back
raised to ten dollars. Five dollars
She recently u n d e r w e n t a
again.
I,, be paid a semester.
very painful o p e r a t i o n on her nose
I'bins an- well miller ay fur the
at
the
Albany
( 'ily I fospital.
[llllitir I'llish
masquerade
which
will be held in the College g y m nasium on the evening of ( I c t o b c r
DELTA OMEGA
31.
Alida liallagh was u n a n i m o u s l y
Margaret Becker, '19, and Winielected cheer leader for the season
fred Magner, '18, spent t h e week191 y 1920.
end al the h o m e of Edith W o o d
rulT. '18, in A u b u r n . Edith recently
MUSIC CLUB
returned
from
canteen
service
abroad.
Alice Lewis, '211, spent the week
Everyone come to Music Club
end at her home in Scotia.
next Monday afternoon!
It will
C o n g r a t u l a t i o n s are extended to
lie held as usual tit 4 p. in. in the
Mr. and Mrs. Phil R e n n e t (Marion
Auditorium,
T h e following proWheeler, '16), on the birth of a
gram will be given:
daughter, Marion.
S o l o — M i s s K a l h r y u ChamberAlida Ballagh, '21, spent a lew
layne.
days at the House the past week.
Reading — M a r g a r e t Kirtland.
Mandolin Selection — Marjorie |
Bryant, l.ela Cackeuer, Alida CurPSI G A M M A
rcy, D. Howell, accompanist.
Reading — J o s e p h i n e llillman.
A
b
a
Sahler,
'18, w a s a g u e s t at
R e a d i n g - - Mary P a t t e r s o n .
the House last S u n d a y .
Mrs. Bn'ggs of P o u g h k e e p s i e
-pent a few clays at t h e House last
week as the guest of h e r d a u g h t e r ,
Alice Briggs, '21.
We welcome Alida Cttrrey, '22,
Monday, Oct. 27, J u n i o r s - S o p h s .
into
full
membership
in Psi
Friday, Oct. 31, S e n i o r s - b r u s h .
Gamma.
Monday, Nov. .3, J u n i o r s - F r o s h .
An informal b i r t h d a y party was
Friday, Nov. 7, S e n i o r s - S o p h s .
held at the House last Friday evenMonday, Nov. 1(1, S e n i o r s - F r o s h .
ing in honor of Madeleine H a r t Friday, Nov. 14. Junior-Sophs.
well, Alice G r a h a m , M a r y Stripling
Monday, Nov. 17, S o p h s - F r o s h .
and
Sally Roody.
Friday, Nov. 21, S e n i o r s - J u n i o r s .
Monday, Nov. 24, S o p h s - F r o s h .
QUARTERLY BOARD
Friday, Nov. 28, S e n i o r s - J u n i o r s
Continued from Page 1.
All g a m e s called at 5 p. m.
SCHEDULE OF CLASS
BASKETBALL GAMES
ETA PHI
Mrs. K i r b y was a guest of F l o r ence Van Ness, '20, at the H o u s e
over the week-end.
B e r t h a T a t e , '20, m o t o r e d to
Syracuse Saturday.
Eta Phi gave an informal birthday party in honor of Madclcnc
Ctimmings, '20, Friday evening.
Helen Van Akcn, '22, spent the
week-end at h e r h o m e in A m s t e r dam.
Gcraldine M u r r a y was a caller
al the House Sunday.
Edith Chandler, '18, was a g u e s t
at the House Sunday.
Jennie M u h l m a n n , '18, is e n g a g e d
in secretarial w o r k in N e w Y o r k
City.
T h e d a Mosher, 16, is t e a c h i n g
Latin at Beacon, N. Y.
E t a Phi r e g r e t s that Helen S c l kirk, '21, has discontinued h e r
course at College.
j
,
|
|
i
|
CHANGES IN RULES
Continued from Page 1.
Class m a y wear wrist watches or
mustaches.
7. No F r e s h m a n is to be allowed
at the H a m p t o n , [Cooler's, T e n
Eyck, or Oriental-Occidental unless c h a p e r o n e d by parents or
guardian.
8. N o F r e s h m a n m a y attend the
Empire under any consideration.
9. F r e s h m e n must appear for
penalties al the specified times or
suffer the dire consequences.
T h e following a r e College T r a ditions:
1. S o p h o m o r e class officers will
a r r a n g e with the Freshmen for a
" g e t - w i s e " meeting soon after
College opens, and may call several other m e e t i n g s during the
year.
2. Any u p p e r c l a s s m a n may deprive any F r e s h m a n of a n y seat in
tiny corridor at the request of said
upperclassman.
.1 All F r e s h m e n must greet all
upperclass and S o p h o m o r e officers
and m e m b e r s of Myskania at all
times.
-I. All F r e s h m e n must remain
sealed in student assembly until all
other s t u d e n t s -hall have passed
out.
5. F r e s h m e n must hold doors
open for all Seniors lo pass. All
Seniors shall enter streets cars before F r e s h m e n .
6. T h e m a r k of identification for
F r e s h m e n shall be a button one
inch in diameter, containing the
class n u m e r a l s and colors, and arc
to be worn in sight at all limes until after M o y i n g - U p Day.
7. T h e F r e s h m e n men will be
obliged to wear the regulation
class caps ( s a m e a s t h o s e worn by
the Frosh of ' I 9 | at all times except S u n d a y s until I he snow flies
and from I he firs I d a y of spring
uniil after M o v i n g - U p Day. T h e s e
are not to he worn in the College
buildings, bill are to he carried in
order that t h e y may be shown any
time on demand.
8. Only Stale College insignia
(This
may be worn by F r e s h m e n .
includes S o r o r i t y and Fraternity
pins, class n u m e r a l s and College
letters, pins of College organizations and chilis.')
9. F r e s h m e n must be segregated
from uppcrclassmen and Sophomores al the basketball games.
KAPPA
NU
The K a p p a Nu girls were delightfully entertained last F r i d a y
evening at the h o m e of Kathcrinc
M'cGarrahan in Cohoes,
lions the editors make their elecMae Cronin, '20, s p e n t the weektions.
end at her h o m e .
" 4 . Election to the Business
Laura G o r m a n , '19, has returned
Managership shall lie d e t e r m i n e d
from the T r o y Hospital w h e r e she
by the Board of E d i t o r s , but the
u n d e r w e n t an operation.
Business M a n a g e r shall n o m i n a t e
Jane Schnitzler, '20, visited her
for I lie position t h e s t u d e n t s w h o
home in K i n g s t o n recently.
have offered t h e m s e l v e s as candiMagdalcna A n d r a e , '19, is spenddates f i r the position a n d have a s ing a few days in N e w York City.
sisted the Business M a n a g e r m o s t
Edna Maneth, '21, s p e n t last
efficiently
in
conducting
t h e i week-end at h e r h o m e in J o h n s finances of the .paper.
W h e n no |
such candidate h a s p r e s e n t e d h i m - i
Mii'drcd O'Malley, '18, visited Alself, elecPon shall be m a d e from j bany recently.
the existing Board of E d i t o r s . "
j
All persons desiring to try o u t
SENIORS!
for Editorships r e p o r t t o Elizabeth
Oshorn, Editor-in-Chief; and those
All those desiring warts, squints,
desiring to be c a n d i d a t e s for Busigrins, e t c , r e m o v e d ; noses straightness .Managership a n d A d v e r t i s i n g
ened, rosebud m o u t h s formed, dimM a n a g e r s h i p r e p o r t to Madeline
Ctimmings, B u s i n e s s M a n a g e r .
j ples set in, or b e a u t y labels inSeveral people a r c a l r e a d y in t h e i serted; also all those dissatisfied in
contest, so, n e w c o n i p c l i t o r s , hand j any w a y with their " P e d a g o g u e "
p h o t o g r a p h s , please see A g n e s M.
in your names as soon a s possible,
and join P r e s s Club.
' Rabe.
Reference Book,! and Student
Helps
Fountain Pens — IValerman, Conklln
and Moore, $2,50
lo $6.00
Skinner's Book Store
44 No. Pearl Street
Opposite Whitney's
Silks, Woolens, Velvets a n d
Fine Cotton Fabrics
at
Upstairs Prices
Courteous treatment and willingness to show
goods assured you here
Hewett's Silk Shop
Over Kreages 5 and 10 cent Store
15-17 No. Pearl St.
Albany, N. Y.
E S T A B L I S H E D 1820
JAMES
MIX
JEWELER
34
SOUTH
PEARL
STREET
Fearey's
for S h o e s
2 3 No. Pearl St.
Cotrell & Leonard
Makers of
CAPS, GOWNS, and Hoods
Broadway, Albany
ORCHIDS
ROSES
EYRES
FLORIST
"SAY IT WITH F L O W E R S "
106 STATE S T R E E ALBANY. N. Y.
TELEPHONE
MAIN SBSB
DA WSON'S
2 5 9 Central A v e .
Men's Furnishings
Hat*
Shot*
EYE
GLASSES
6 5 S O U T H P E A R L STREET
L. G .
SCHNEIBLE
PHARMACY
SCHOOL
muppuMB
ON OOLLEQB
rmurmooKm
omommo
OORNER
STATE COLLEGE NEWS, OCTOBER 23, 1919
Page 4
R. O . T . C.
Continued from Page 1.
reduced to a m i n i m u m while cons e r v i n g efficiency and leaving the
m a i n w o r k of drill and field w o r k
to the two s u m m e r camps p r o posed."
The
revised
regulations
will
effect 26S i n s t i t u t i o n s of all classes
affiliated with the W a r
Departm e n t in which a p p r o x i m a t e l y o n e
h u n d r e d t h o u s a n d s t u d e n t s arc und e r m i l i t a r y training.
T h e y are
d i s t r i b u t e d o v e r every State and
territory
in the
Union
except
Alaska and i n c l u d i n g f'orto R i c o
and H a w a i i .
O t h e r institutions not having R,
O. T. C. units were appealed to by
S e c r e t a r y B a k e r w h o said:
"I
c a n n o t too s t r o n g l y urge upon the
a u t h o r i t i e s of o u r universities and
colleges and upon o u r American
s t u d e n t s the g r e a t educational and
physical value to our y o u n g men
of the t r a i n i n g thus offered.
ft
will give to t h e m an o p p o r t u n i t y
to r e n d e r valuable ami patriotic
service and to o u r nation a large
b o d y of educated men able and
ready to take responsible positions
if the need of national defense
should arise.
It will g r e a t l y aid in
p u t t i n g A m e r i c a in a position to
p r e s e r v e peace by r e n d e r i n g evident our p o w e r to resist a g g r e s sion.''
S e c r e t a r y B a k e r paid tribute to
" t h e g l o r i o u s p a r t played by the
colleges of this c o u n t r y in the
recent struggle."
He said that " i t
is to the collegiate institutions of
the nation that wc must always
turn to sim'ily t h e material from
which the c o m m i s s i o n e d
officer
personnel for o u r immense citizen
a r m i e s m u s t be developed.
.More
than fifty t h o u s a n d of our A r m y
and N a v y officers in this war were
d r a w n from one h u n d r e d and fifty
institutions of learning.
And at
the early t r a i n i n g c a m p s for officers there was evident one very
s t r i k i n g fact,— t h a t the y o u n g men
w h o had come from schools and
colleges w h e r e military training
had previously prevailed were the
men w h o m o s t quickly and readily
b e c a m e available for active and
efficient service.
With the h o u r
of battle only a few weeks distant,
the value of the t r a i n i n g they had
a l r e a d y received while at college
was of i m m e n s e i m p o r t a n c e . M o d ern w a r f a r e d e m a n d s of its officer.-.,
leaders a complex and scientific
professional skill and a careful and
t h o r o u g h g r o u n d i n g in the fundam e n t a l principles upon which to
build.
A s our a r m i e s will in all
p r o b a b i l i t y a l w a y s be t h o s e of citiz e n r y d r a w n to t h e colors when
the e m e r g e n c y arises, it follows
that the bulk of o u r officers m u s t
be also citizens w h o leave their
civil p u r s u i t s and take up their
a r m s a l r e a d y trained in the habit
of discipline and the principles of
l e a d e r s h i p . T h i s t r a i n i n g and experience it is believed can best be
secured t h r o u g h the military ins t r u c t i o n which can be imparted in
the s c h o o l s and colleges."
S e c r e t a r y Baker declared that
" it h a s not been in the past, nor is
it n o w , the idea or intention of the
G o v e r n m e n t in r e - i n s t i t u t i n g a syst e m of military t r a i n i n g for stud e n t s to develop a militaristic spirit
in o u r people. T h e r e is a wide gulf
b e t w e e n m i l i t a r y proficiency
as
typified b y t h e A m e r i c a n citizen
trained to a r m s and confident of
his proficiency and t h a t militaristic
spirit which the P r u s s i a n system
developed d u r i n g the p a s t forty
y e a r s . I t is our idea to develop in
the nation a c i t i z e n r y trained and
capable of efficiently b e a r i n g a r m s
for t h e national defense. T o train
and to lead this citizen a r m y wc
m u s t d r a w upon our
educated
y o u n g m e n for those who are
capable of d e v e l o p i n g as officers.
Ft is one of the axioms of military
science t h a t intelligent leadership
on the p a r t of officer personnel
m e a n s the c o n s e r v a t i o n and saving
of life of t h e t r o o p s . "
" T h e t r a i n i n g of officers dem a n d s first of all time,— the time
essential to the formation of a
habit of discipline which cannot be
said to be native in A m e r i c a n
youth.
Discipline has been called
the habit of quickness and p r e cision in t h o u g h t and action, combined with a r e g a r d for a u t h o r i t y
which e n a b l e s one to play his part
in the w o r k of a team.
It lies at
the b o t t o m of all successful team
work."
" A m e r i c a n education in the past
has been inclined to overlook the
necessity
of
emphasizing
that
phase of its manifold
activities
which deals with the subject o r
p r e p a r a t i o n for national defense.
A college education which lias left
u n t o u c h e d (he lilting of its subject
for active service under his country's flag is, and m u s t be, incomplete. In the R, f). T. C. the college finds this vital addition to its
curriculum and the student who
pursues the t r a i n i n g which it offers
finds the o p p o r t u n i t y for physical
and m e n t a l d e v e l o p m e n t
which
c o m p l e t e s bis equipment fur the
battles of life."
SALE
National Simplex Covers, 3801 -3802-3804-3806
4 9 Cents Each
Brennan's Stationery Store
THE
HAMILTON PRINTING CO.
PRODUCERS OF THE BETTER CLASS OF
BOOKLETS. CATALOGS, PUBLICATIONS, AND
DIRECT BY MAIL ADVERTISING
PR IN TER S OF THE STATE C O L L E G E N E W S
240
HAMILTON STREET
ALBANY, N. Y.
Perkins Silk S h o p
T h e P i o n e e r Specially Shop
in Capital District
STUDENT ASSEMBLY
Continued from Page 1.
a c m e of h y p o c r i s y to sing patriotic
s o n g s if wv do not perform our
d u t y as citizens.
Mr. Wilford J. Clark, who succeeds Mr. M a r o n c y as coach at
S t a t e College, was presented by
Mr. Schivone to the student body.
Mr. Clark a n n o u n c e d the plans for
the winter, including class g a m e s ,
track m e e t s to be held in the
A r m o r y , and a series of baseball
g a m e s to be held later in I he school
year.
Mr. S c h i v o n e read the F r e s h m e n
Rules as divided into those .Myskania and the s t u d e n t body would
uphold, and 'those 'the S o p h o m o r e
Class m u s t enforce.
W h e n he
asked the a p p r o v a l of the student
b o d y of such a division, it was
u n a n i m o u s l y given.
Opposite High School
Cor. Washington and Lake Aves.
Near State College
Monmy Savmd On Every
Yard
P E R K I N S SILK S H O P
2 8 State Street
The
White Lintie Tea Rooms
J O H N J. CONKEY
New, Dealer
Printing and Developing, Camera Films
and Electrical Supplies
Complete line of School Supplies, Stationery,
Cigars, Candy and Magazines
205 Central Ave.
Albany, N. Y.
PhaneW*i20t7-W
44 North Pearl Street
F i t A INK I I .
Albany, N. Y.
E V O R Y & CO.
Printers
3 0 and 3 8 Heaver Street
P H O N E WEST 2 3 4 4
ANNUAL
CONVOCATION
OSHER'S GOODYEAR SHOE
REPAIR WORKS
Continued from page I
S c h o o l s , " p r e s e n t e d by representatives of labor, e m p l o y e r s , education and health.
F r i d a y e v e n i n g Dr. J o h n
II.
Finlcy, P r e s i d e n t of the University,
p r e s e n t e d S e c r e t a r y Lansing with
the d e g r e e of D o c t o r of Law. O n l y
four living men now hold this
greatest
h o n o r in the gift of
Regcwts, C a r d i n a l Mercier, Elihu
Root, T h o m a s Edison and Jules
Jusscrand.
Secretary
Lansing
pleaded for a trial of the League of
Nations C o v e n a n t and warned the
nation against " class imperialism."
" It m u s t be r e c o r d e d , " he said,
" that wc m a d e the world safe for
d e m o c r a c y , but that we failed to
m a k e ' A m e r i c a safe for d e m o c racy' ! "
Dr. T h o m a s E. Fincgan, State
S u p e r i n t e n d e n t of Public Instruction in P e n n s y l v a n i a , and formerly
D e p u t y of S t a t e Commission of
E d u c a t i o n , w a s welcomed, and his
successor as D e p u t y , Dr. FrankGilbert, was i n t r o d u c e d to the convocation.
Dr. Edwin C. J o n e s , President of
Fukicu
University,
Foo-Chovv,
China, and the Rev. H o w a r d S.
Bliss, P r e s i d e n t of the P r o t e s t a n t
College Beirut, Syria, were speakers at the conference.
28 CENTRAL AVE.
FROSH BEAT
JUNIORS
A L B A N Y . N. Y.
A U T O C A L L A N D DELIVERY
C o n t i n u e d from p a g e 1
KAPPA DELTA
Score:
Freshmen
Maine am
J o h n s o n , If.
S t e w a r t , rf.
Fiscus, c. ..
.Myers, rg. .
Reilley, Ig.
Doberez, Ig.
T|».
14
Alice Keesor, '20, Hilda Blair,
'20, and Bertha West, '20, spent
S u n d a y at Geraldine Crumb's, '20,
at W a t e r v l i e t .
.Marion Baker, '20, spent the
week-end at her home at VVayvillc.
Miss Pierce had d i n n e r at the
H o u s e T u e s d a y , O c t o b e r 14.
24
Juniors
Xa e and i
('a ssi ml, rf.
Met'I •e, If. .
11alh
n, c.-rl
foil,
.. I g •
Bake
H a k e s, lg.
Bcntl
Fb.
4
0
4
0
(I
(I
0
16
Fp. T p ,
1 0
0
0
6
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
7
23
S u m m a r y : S c o r e at half time —
F r e s h m e n , 16; J u n i o r s , 15. Referee
— Powers.
Scorer — Springman.
Time keeper — Sehiavone.
Time
of h a l v e s — 1 5 m i n u t e s .
ALPHA EPSILON PHI
Alpha
Epsilon
['hi
welcomes
Rose
Breslau,
'21, and
Dora
Schwadclsoii, '21, as pledge m e m bers.
Golclie Bloom, '20, spent
the
week-end in K i n g s t o n .
Julia D o b r i s , '20, entertained the
girls at her home in W o o d l a w n
avenue.
E d y t h e S h e r m a n , '20, m o t o r e d to
t'atskiil last S u n d a y .
J e n n i e R o s e n g a r d , '20, was the
guest of Dora G a r b o s e , '22.
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