Changes and Properties of Matter

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Megan Zaba
RDG 589
November 25, 2008
Title: Changes and Properties of Matter
Curriculum: Grade 2 Science
Grade Level Span: This unit is targeted for second grade students who are part of a Project
CHILD cluster. CHILD stands for Changing How Instruction for Learning is Delivered. A
Project CHILD cluster is made up of three teachers who have a grade 1, 2, or 3 homeroom but
teach Math, Writing, or Reading to all three of those homerooms. The Project CHILD classroom
is structured around a 90-minute block, which consists of a 20-minute whole group lesson and
six stations through which the students rotate during the period of a week. This lesson will take
place during the reading block. The students in this class are from diverse socioeconomic and
cultural backgrounds, and are currently reading on various levels. A few of the students are
English Language Learners who speak English in school but another language at home.
Content Objectives: The inquiry question that will serve to guide the science content of this
unit is: How does the structure of matter affect the properties and uses of materials?
The primary Science focus for this unit will address the conceptual theme of properties of
matter. Standard 2.1 describes that materials can be classified as solid, liquid or gas based on
their observable properties. Students will study this standard through a series of related
experiments and observations.
Reading/Language Arts Objectives: The primary Language Arts focus for this unit will
address Standard 1 of the State of Connecticut English Language Arts Curriculum Standards for
grade 2. The students will comprehend and respond in literal, critical and evaluative ways to
various texts that are read, viewed and heard. This will be supported by non-fiction trade books
and leveled readers. Before, during, and after reading activities will be created for these nonfiction books related to the topic of matter. The development of vocabulary will be an important
focus for the Language Arts instruction of the unit. Students will use content-specific
vocabulary in speaking, reading and writing. In addition the unit will address Standard 4:
Applying English Conventions. Strands 4.1, 4.2, and 4.3, address the expository writing focus.
Students will write to explain a process, e.g., how to solve a math problem, and how to report
scientific observations.
LEARNING/TEACHING
ACTIVITIES
NCTE/IRA Standards
Student Performance
Indicators
IRA Teacher
Competencies
(Program Portfolio
subcategory
addressed)
Frameworks
Standards
Science
Frameworks
OR
Math
Frameworks
OR
Social Studies
Frameworks
Technology: Cyberlesson
To introduce the unit, the students
will complete the Cyberlesson titled
“What is the World Made Of”
based around a book written by
Katherine Weidner Zoehfeld.
Guided Reading
Over the course of the next six
weeks the students will engage in
stories that relate to the content of
properties of matter.
Guided Reading leveled text titles
include:
1. Where Did all the Water Go? By
Annette Smith, Jenny Giles, and
Beverly Randell
DRA level 8
2. Freezing and Melting by Robin
Nelson
DRA level 14
Standard 1
Students read a wide range
of print and non-print texts
to build an understanding
of texts, of themselves, and
of the cultures of the
United States and the
world; to acquire new
information; to respond to
the needs and demands of
society and the workplace;
and for personal
fulfillment. Among these
texts are fiction and
nonfiction, classic and
contemporary works.
Standard 3
Students apply a wide
range of strategies to
comprehend, interpret,
evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their
prior experience, their
interactions with other
readers and writers, their
knowledge of word
meaning and of other texts,
their word identification
strategies, and their
understanding of textual
features (e.g., sound-letter
correspondence, sentence
structure, context,
4.2 Use a large
supply of books,
technology-based
information, and
non-print materials
representing
multiple levels,
broad interests, and
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
4.2 Use a large
supply of books,
technology-based
information, and
non-print materials
representing
multiple levels,
broad interests, and
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
3. Matter by Christine Webster
DRA level 20
4. The Water Cycle by David Meissner
DRA level 26
This part of the unit will take place
in the Teacher Station
graphics).
Writing
Over the course of the course of the
next six weeks, the students will
keep a Science Journal. Entries will
include the following:
1) questions they would like to
answer through their research of
matter 2) evidence of matter
changes collected from experiments
3) reflections that compare and
contrast experiments or observed
phenomena 4) written clarification
of experiments 5) support for or
against their hypothesis 6)
reflections on all they are learning
and come to some conclusions
about the properties of matter
7) responses to content related
literature read in class.
Students will be allowed to draw
pictures to illustrate their thoughts
and with the help of a partner put
their illustrations into words.
This part of the unit will take place
in each station.
Rubric for Science Journal
Science
Students will conduct a series of 3
experiments over a 6-day period
that will serve as the starting point
in their exploration of solids and
liquids.
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
Standard 5
Students employ a wide
range of strategies as they
write and use different
writing process elements
appropriately to
communicate with
different audiences for a
variety of purposes.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
1.1 Demonstrate
knowledge of
psychological,
sociological and
linguistic
foundations of
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
Standard 7
Students conduct research
on issues and interests by
generating ideas and
questions, and by posing
problems. They gather,
evaluate, and synthesize
data from a variety of
sources (e.g., print and
non-print texts, artifacts,
people) to communicate
their discoveries in ways
that suit their purpose and
audience.
Standard 12
Students use spoken,
written, and visual
language to accomplish
their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment,
persuasion, and the
exchange of information).
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
1. Students observe and
describe the properties of an
effervescent tablet and those
of a cup of water. Then
students test, observe, and
describe the changes that
occur when they drop an
effervescent tablet into a cup
of water.
2. Students observe and record
the properties of ice.
Students design and
implement a method for
melting an ice cube. Finally
students set up an
investigation of evaporation.
3. Students study a petri dish
of water for 1 week and
record the changes they
observe. Students discuss
with partner where they
thought the water has gone.
Students set up an
investigation of evaporation
and condensation.
This part of the unit will take place
in the Challenge Station.
Rubric for Science Experiments
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
Standard 5
Students employ a wide
range of strategies as they
write and use different
writing process elements
appropriately to
communicate with
different audiences for a
variety of purposes.
reading and writing
processes and
instruction.
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Movement
Students role-play the movement of
solids and liquids and gases by
physically simulating each phase.
1. Students simulate a solid (ice
cube): Students stand close together
in a group in orderly rows and
remain still.
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
A picture of fire or sun is revealed.
2. Students simulate a liquid (ice
cube melting to water): Students
rotate or do-si-do around each other
but remain connected as a group.
The thermometer reveals that the
temperature has been increased.
Standard 12
Students use spoken,
written, and visual
language to accomplish
their own purposes (e.g.,
for learning, enjoyment,
persuasion, and the
exchange of information).
2.2 Use a wide
range of
instructional
practices,
approaches, and
methods, including
technology-based
practices for
learners at differing
stages of
development and
from differing
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
3. Students simulate a gas (boiling
water): Students move their bodies
quickly around the room and spread
themselves out from their
classmates.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
The thermometer reveals that the
temperature has decreased to
freezing. A picture of snow is
revealed as a cue card.
4. Students simulate condensation
and freezing (boiling water turns
back slowly to an ice cube):
Students slowly come back together
as a group and move around each
other as they had in step 2. Then
students stand close together in a
group in orderly rows and remain
still as they had been in the
beginning of step 1.
This part of the unit will take place
during whole-class instructional
time.
Science
Students will conduct a series of 3
experiments over a 6-day period to
observe and describe the changes
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
1.1 Demonstrate
knowledge of
psychological,
sociological and
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
that result from mixing and
separating substances.
1. Students observe and
describe the properties of
salt and gravel both
individually and as a
mixture. Students separate
the mixture with a sieve.
Students determine whether
the salt and gravel have
changed as a result of being
mixed and separated.
2. Students observe and
describe gravel, tissue, and
salt as solids. Then students
mix each one with water and
observe how each substance
behaves when mixed with
water.
3. Students brainstorm ways of
separating the mixture from
the previous experiment and
implement their ideas.
Finally students set up an
evaporation investigation
with their salt and water
mixture.
This part of the unit will take place
in the Challenge Station
Rubric for Science Experiments
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
Standard 5
Students employ a wide
range of strategies as they
write and use different
writing process elements
appropriately to
communicate with
different audiences for a
variety of purposes.
linguistic
foundations of
reading and writing
processes and
instruction.
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Science
Students will conduct a series of 2
experiments over a 4-day period to
investigate the process of
dissolving.
1. Students compare and
discuss the properties of two
forms of suger: sugar cube
and granulated sugar. Then
students investigate how
both dissolve in water.
Students record and discuss
their observations.
2. Students observe what
happens when they mix
granulated sugar with cold
and warm water. Students
share their observations and
discuss the relationship
between water temperature
and the speed at which sugar
dissolves.
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
1.1 Demonstrate
knowledge of
psychological,
sociological and
linguistic
foundations of
reading and writing
processes and
instruction.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
1.1 Demonstrate
knowledge of
psychological,
sociological and
linguistic
foundations of
reading and writing
processes and
instruction.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Standard 5
Students employ a wide
range of strategies as they
write and use different
writing process elements
appropriately to
communicate with
different audiences for a
variety of purposes.
This part of the unit will take place
in the Challenge Station
Rubric for Science Experiments
Science
Students will conduct a series of 2
experiments over a 4-day period to
investigate the process of a
chemical reaction.
1. Students observe and
describe baking soda, water,
and vinegar. Students mix
baking soda and water and
describe what they observe.
Then students mix baking
soda and vinegar and
describe what they observe.
Students compare both
observations. Finally
students discuss the bubble
produced by the reaction of
baking soda and vinegar.
2. Students observe the
changes that occur when
they put an effervescent
Standard 4
Students adjust their use of
spoken, written, and visual
language (e.g.,
conventions, style,
vocabulary) to
communicate effectively
with a variety of audiences
and for different purposes.
Standard 5
Students employ a wide
range of strategies as they
write and use different
writing process elements
appropriately to
communicate with
different audiences for a
variety of purposes.
tablet into a bag of water.
Students discuss their
observations and describe
how the tablet and the water
change. Students observe
and discuss the properties of
gas. Finally students
compare what they have
learned about the properties
of solids, liquids, and gases.
This part of the unit will take place
in the Challenge Station
Rubric for Science Experiments
Read – A- Louds
The teacher will read stories and
informational texts related to the
subject of matter to the students.
Students and teacher will discuss
the story and identify the way it
relates to our unit of study.
This part of the unit will take place
during whole-class instructional
time.
Read – A – Loud titles include:
1. Apples, Bubbles, and Cyrstals:
Your Science ABC’s by Andrea T.
Bennet & James H. Kessler
2. Fritz and the Mess Fairy by
Rosemary Wells
3. Emmett’s Snowball by Ned
Miller
4. Change It!: Solids, Liquids, and
You by Adrienne Mason
5. Gobs of Goo by Vicki Cobb
6. Why do Leaves Change Color?
by Betsy Maestro
Standard 1
Students read a wide range
of print and non-print texts
to build an understanding
of texts, of themselves, and
of the cultures of the
United States and the
world; to acquire new
information; to respond to
the needs and demands of
society and the workplace;
and for personal
fulfillment. Among these
texts are fiction and
nonfiction, classic and
contemporary works.
4.2 Use a large
supply of books,
technology-based
information, and
non-print materials
representing
multiple levels,
broad interests, and
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Technology
This part of the unit will take place
in the Computer Station.
Students will visit the following
websites and explore the world of
solids, liquids, and gases:
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
http://www.fossweb.com/modulesK2/SolidsandLiquids/index.html
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/stud
yjams/matter_states/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/s
cience/activities/gases.shtml
After visiting the sites students will
write down on sticky notes what
they learned. Then students will
sort and classify the new
information they learned to write a
short summary.
Rubric for Website Summary
Independent Research
Students will choose a topic related
to matter and use the following
informational literature and
websites to answer their questions
and write a small report.
Informational Literature:
1.States of Matter: A Question and
Answer Book by Fiona Bayrock
2. Solids, Liquids, and Gases by
Louise Osborne and Carol Gold
3. Let’s Investigate Science: Matter
and Materials by Robbin Kerrod
4. Matter by Christine Webster
5. Freezing and Melting by Robin
Nelson
6. The Water Cycle by David
Meissner
Standard 7
Students conduct research
on issues and interests by
generating ideas and
questions, and by posing
problems. They gather,
evaluate, and synthesize
data from a variety of
sources (e.g., print and
non-print texts, artifacts,
people) to communicate
their discoveries in ways
that suit their purpose and
audience.
4.2 Use a large
supply of books,
technology-based
information, and
non-print materials
representing
multiple levels,
broad interests, and
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
Possible Websites
http://www.fossweb.com/modulesK2/SolidsandLiquids/index.html
http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/stud
yjams/matter_states/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/s
cience/activities/gases.shtml
http://www.strangematterexhibit.com/inde
x.html
http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/web/matter.ht
ml
http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngex
plorer/0501/articles/mainarticle.html
Topics of inquiry could include:
1) How does weather affect the
changes of matter?
2) How do materials change when
they are recycled?
3) What is in soda that makes it
fizzy and why doesn’t it stay fizzy
when you leave it out?
4) What changes in states of matter
take place to make ice cream, bake
a cake, etc,?
5) What changes could be
dangerous for our planet?
This part of the unit will take place
in the textbook station and the
computer station.
Rubric for Science Inquiry Project
Reading and Listening
Students will read and listen to
specific books related to matter.
Some are fiction and others are
non-fiction stories. After listening
to the story students will complete a
graphic organizer that relates the
book to what they have learned
about matter.
This part of the unit will take place
in the Reading and Listening
Station.
1. Fritz and the Mess Fairy by
Rosemary Wells
2. Emmett’s Snowball by Ned
Miller
3. Why do Leaves Change Color?
by Betsy Maestro
Word Study
Students will sort and classify
words and make an ABC book
about Changes and Properties of
Matter. Examples of words that
relate to matter: solid, liquid, gas,
dissolve, evaporate, freezing,
melting, solution, water vapor,
water, salt, sugar, baking soda,
vinegar, sugar cube, salt, gravel,
ice, etc.
This part of the unit will take place
Standard 1
Students read a wide range
of print and non-print texts
to build an understanding
of texts, of themselves, and
of the cultures of the
United States and the
world; to acquire new
information; to respond to
the needs and demands of
society and the workplace;
and for personal
fulfillment. Among these
texts are fiction and
nonfiction, classic and
contemporary works.
Standard 3
Students apply a wide
range of strategies to
comprehend, interpret,
evaluate, and appreciate
texts. They draw on their
prior experience, their
interactions with other
readers and writers, their
knowledge of word
meaning and of other texts,
their word identification
strategies, and their
understanding of textual
features (e.g., sound-letter
correspondence, sentence
structure, context,
graphics).
10. Students whose first
language is not English
make use of their first
language to develop
competency in the English
language arts and to
develop understanding of
content across the
curriculum.
4.2 Use a large
supply of books,
technology-based
information, and
non-print materials
representing
multiple levels,
broad interests, and
cultural and
linguistic
backgrounds.
4.3 Model reading
and writing
enthusiastically as
valued lifelong
activities.
2.2 Use a wide
range of
instructional
practices,
approaches, and
methods, including
technology-based
practices for
learners at differing
stages of
development and
from differing
cultural and
Progressive
Development
PreK - 2
Standard I:
Scientific
literacy
includes
speaking,
listening,
presenting,
interpreting,
reading and
writing about
science.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
2.1 Materials
can be
classified as
solid, liquid or
gas based on
their observable
properties.
in the Word Study Station.
linguistic
backgrounds.
TOOLS AND RESOURCES:
(List and briefly annotate websites, 5 annotated children’s texts, specific software and hardware,
and other needs to support this unit)
I.
Websites for unit:
1. http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks2bitesize/science/activities/gases.shtml: Students can click and drag
objects into the category of matter they belong. This interactive website will help the students
sort and classify the different states of matter. This website will be used at the computer station
and will be part of the website summary the students have to write.
2. http://www.strangematterexhibit.com/index.html: Students explore everyday objects and watch how
they can change state by adding or removing heat. This website could be used as a resource for
the inquiry project as well as at the computer station and will be part of the website summary the
students have to write.
3. http://edtech.kennesaw.edu/web/matter.html This site is a very helpful index of sites that explore the
different states and properties of matter. This website will be a helpful resource for the students
when they conduct their inquiry project. There is a wealth of information in just this one site for
the students to research. This site will also be used at the computer station and will be part of
the website summary the students have to write.
4. http://magma.nationalgeographic.com/ngexplorer/0501/articles/mainarticle.html: This website provides an
article about how the glaciers are melting away and the dangerous affects this has on our planet.
It describes in terms young students can understand the causes of the glacier melting and the
significance it has for all of us. This website can be used for the inquiry project or an additional
resource for the cyberlesson final project.
5. http://www.fossweb.com/modulesK-2/SolidsandLiquids/index.html: This website provides interactive
activities for the students to learn about the different states of matter and how to change them
from one state to another. This website will be used at the computer station and will be part of
the website summary the students have to write.
6. http://teacher.scholastic.com/activities/studyjams/matter_states/: This website is a video of two students
talking about the states of matter and how the state can be changed by adding or taking away
heat. This video is used in my cyberlesson as an attention getter for the students to get some
background information about matter in a way that is exciting. This video will also be reintroduced at the computer station and will be part of the website summary the students have to
write. Students may also choose to use this website for their inquiry project.
II. Bibliography:
Bayrock, F. (2006). States of Matter: A Question and Answer Book.
Bennet A. & Kessler J.(1996). Apples, Bubbles, and Cyrstals: Your Science ABC’s. New York,
NY: McGraw Hill
Boudreau, R. (1995). Solids, Liquids and Gases. Buffalo, NY: Kids Can Press Ltd.
Bradley, D. A. (2002). Atoms and Elements. Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press.
Clark, J. (2003). Matter and Energy: Physics in Action. New York: Oxford University Press.
Cobb V. (1983). Gobs of Goo New York, NY: J.B. Lipincott
Kerrod R. (1996). Let’s Investigate Science: Matter and Materials. Tarrytown, NY: Marshall
Cavendish Corporation.
Meissner, D. (2006). The Water Cycle. Chicago, IL: Wright Group/McGraw Hill
Nelson R. (2003). Freezing and Melting. Minneapolis, MN: Lerner Publications Company
Osborne, L. & Gold, C. (1995). Solids, Liquids, and Gases. Buffalo, NY: Kids Can Press.
Smith, A. (2000). Where did All the Water Go? Barrington, IL: Rigby Education.
Wells, R. (1991). Fritz and the Mess Fairy. New York, NY: Dial Books for Young Readers
II. Annotated Bibliogrpahy:
Maestro, B. (1994). Why do Leaves Change Color? New York, NY: HarperCollins Publishers.
This story studies the concept of change in relation to the affect of seasons on the leaves.
The book describes the make up of a leaf and the process of the drastic changes that take place
depending on the season and the weather. The book is a good to start the unit on Changes
because students are familiar with the change that takes place in leaves every year. They can use
this knowledge to begin the process of understanding changes in states of matter. The vibrant
pictures will really grab the students’ attention. This book will also be placed in the Reading and
Listening Station for the students to read and listen to on tape.
Mason, A. (2006). Change It!: Solids, Liquids, and You. Tonawanda, NY: Kids Can Press.
This book describes matter and goes into detail of each state of matter. After it describes
the state, it provides some hands on activities for the child to study the concept of how each state
takes up space differently. For example, after the author explains the concept of a liquid, the
next page has an activity using food coloring, water, and various containers that proves that
liquids take the shape of their container. This informational book will help the students better
understand the activity titled “Movement” in the unit.
Miller, N. (1990). Emmett’s Snowball. New York, NY: Henry Holt and Company, Inc.
This book is a fictional story about a boy named Emmett who gets help from all of his
friends on a snow day to make an enormous snowball. The snowball kept rolling and rolling
down a hill and continued to grow larger. The snowball was so large it even made the
newspaper. Soon the weather got warm and people started to forget about the snowball. The
snowball got so small that Emmett could pick it up in the palm of his and keep it in his freezer.
This silly story helps the students connect with the idea of melting and changing from a solid to a
liquid. This book will also be placed in the Reading and Listening Station for the students to
read and listen to on tape.
Webster, C. (2005) Matter. Mankato, MN: Capstone Press.
This book is a second grade appropriate informational book all about matter. It describes
the various states, how changes can occur, and how we use matter in our everyday lives. It also
discusses the scientist Jacques Charles and his discoveries with gas. There is an easy to use
glossary in the back of the book along with additional resources like books and internet sites that
provide more information on this subject. This book is intended for students to read
independently to complete their research projects.
Weidner, Zoehfeld K. (1998). What is the World Made of? All About Solids, Liquids, and Gases.
New York, NY HarperCollins Publishers.
This is a very comprehensive book about solids, liquids, and gases intended for the young
audience. Through examples and descriptive pictures, the author describes in detail the three
states of matter and how they change. The examples are taken from what children see everyday
and is a part of their lives. This book is very easy for students to understand and is a great
resource to provide the students with a lot of background knowledge as they begin the unit on
properties of matter. For this reason, I have chosen this book for the cyberlesson, which will be
the first activity of the unit.
ASSESSMENT
(How will you assess the students’ learning? List
Be as specific as possible.)
1.
Rubric for Science Experiment
2.
Rubric for Inquiry Project
3.
Rubric for Website Summary
4.
Rubric for Science Journal
rubrics here, and attach them to your outline.
CREDITS (INCLUDING CONTACT INFORMATION) (Record the names,
websites of those who contributed to the development of this learning activity)
Curriculum Resources
Science and Technology for Children. (2002). Changes: Teachers Guide. Burlington, NC:
Carolina Biological Supply Company.
Science and Technology for Children. (2002). Changes: Experiment Kit. Burlington, NC:
Carolina Biological Supply Company.
Meaghan Carroll – Meaghan provided valuable feedback for my cyberlesson PowerPoint
presentation and was a good resource for ideas throughout the creation of this unit.
Jessica Hovenstine – Jessica was a good resource for ideas throughout the creation of the unit.
Becky Caplinger – Becky was an excellent resource for appropriate matter related websites for
this unit. Becky was very helpful in the technology aspect of the unit.
REFLECTION:
(What are the ah-ha’s/experiences you had in developing this unit. How might it connect to your
own teaching to enhance student learning?)
This unit was created for a second grade class who is studying the topic of Changes and
Properties of Matter. I have taught this unit on Changes to my second grade class for the past 5
years. Creating this Integrated Language Arts Unit allowed me to explore how I could include
the other disciplines in this unit to make it more literacy based. I was shocked about the wealth
of resources I found about this topic. There is so much literature written about solids, liquids,
and gases as well as a wealth of interesting websites devoted to the exploration of this topic.
From my research, I realized how I could include guided reading lessons into the unit and teach
content while teaching reading strategies. In years past, I have basically just followed the
teacher’s manual from the kit the district provides us but now I am aware of how much deeper I
can go into this topic just by integrating it more with my reading and writing instruction. I have
never used Science Journals before. This will be an effective addition to the unit because it will
act as documentation of all the learning the students have done over the course of the unit. The
students will be able to go back and re-read what they wrote and see how much the have grown
as a learner throughout the six weeks. I am very excited about implementing the inquiry project
with the students. I have never included this type of activity in my units before but I think it will
be a great way to challenge and motivate the students to explore this topic further. They have a
choice of what to research for the project and how they would like to present it. This kind of
project will allow the students to really take an active role in their own learning. The
cyberlesson I created will be a powerful way to start off the unit. I feel confident that the
cyberlesson will attract their attention and get them motivated to continue learning about the
changes and properties of matter.
The biggest challenge I anticipate facing is not having enough time to do all of this in six
weeks. Our district divides the units into six-week schedules. As I mentioned at the beginning
of the unit outline, I teach reading to three grade levels for an hour and a half each day. Almost
every Thursday we have a half-day, which means I see each class for only an hour on those days.
This set-up makes it a little difficult for me to complete all of the elements of this comprehensive
Integrated Language Arts Unit in six weeks. I believe that every part of the unit is important and
I will try very hard to make sure I include every aspect in my instruction.
Overall, I think the implementation of this Integrated Language Arts Unit will be
extremely effective with my students. They will be exposed to a variety of media from which
they will learn and they will be participating in many hands-on activities. In addition to learning
the important Science content, they will also be improving their reading and writing abilities. I
believe this unit will help my reluctant students to become more involved and enthusiastic about
learning.
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