Parental Involvement Requirements for NCLB Programs

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Parental Involvement
Requirements for
NCLB Programs
Title I Statewide School Support/Parental Involvement Initiative
Region 16 Education Service Center
2008 - 2009
Skip Forsyth
Introduction: NCLB
Signed into Law
The President Speaks…
No Child Left Behind
“Today begins a new era, a new
beginning for public education in our
country. Our schools will have
higher expectations – we believe
every child can learn. From this day
forward all students will have a better
chance to learn, to excel, and to
live out their dreams.”
President George W. Bush
www.ed.gov
No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001 was
signed into law on January 8, 2002. The four main
focuses of the law are:
ÏStronger accountability for student achievement
ÏFlexibility and local control
ÏFocus on what works (scientifically based research)
ÏParental Involvement
No Child Left Behind Overview
The NCLB Act recognizes that all
children can achieve the same high
standards and must be provided the
education they need to reach those
standards.
No Child Left Behind Overview
Successful student academic performance
depends on the opportunity to attend schools
that:
ÏProvide instruction to all students that will lead to
gains in achievement for all students
ÏAre accountable to the public for results
ÏHave highly qualified teachers and principals
ÏProvide a learning environment that is safe, drug
free, and conducive to learning
No Child Left Behind Overview
Under the new law, Public Law
107-110, schools will strive to
provide every student with a highquality education – regardless of
income, ability or background.
No Child Left Behind (NCLB) gives
parents new opportunities to make
sure their child receives the very
best education possible.
National Standards for Family-School
Partnerships
ÏFamilies are active participants in the life of the
school
ÏFamilies and school staff will engage in regular, twoway, meaningful communication about student
learning
ÏFamilies and school staff continuously collaborate to
support student learning
ÏFamilies are empowered to be advocates for children
National Standards for Family-School
Partnerships (cont’d)
ÏFamilies and school staff are equal partners in
decisions that affect children and families
ÏFamilies and school staff collaborate with
community members to connect to expanded
learning opportunities, community services, and
civic participation
National PTA
Keys to Successful Partnerships: Six Types of
Involvement
ÏParenting
ÏCommunicating
ÏVolunteering
ÏLearning at Home
ÏDecision Making
ÏCollaborating with the Community
Joyce Epstein, National Network of Partnership Schools
A Primary Theme:
School Accountability
Accountability
The primary theme of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) is
holding schools accountable for improving student
performance, and parents are viewed as integral players in
that process. Throughout the school improvement
process, the state, district, or school must communicate
with the parents of each child attending the school.
The regulations require State Education Agencies (SEA),
Local Education Agencies (LEA), and schools to provide
accountability information to parents directly. The
regulations also emphasize that all communications must
respect the privacy of students and their families.
Accountability (cont’d)
Perhaps the key mechanism for parental input is the annual
school review for determining adequate yearly progress
(AYP). The results of this review must be communicated by
the LEA to parents, teachers, principals and the community
at large.
If a school is found to be “In Need of Improvement,” the
school must develop a school plan, and parents must be
given an opportunity for input. In fact, any LEA may
condition approval of the school’s improvement plan on
community and parental support.
Other Priorities of NCLB
Flexibility and Funding
ÏFederal funding for education is at an all-time high
ÏNCLB funding has increased 62% from 2001 to
2009
ÏThere is greater flexibility to use resources where
they are needed most
Flexibility and Funding
ESEA $$
NCLB $$
IDEA $$
2001
8,762,721,000
14,274,538,000
7,113,252,000
2009
(estimate)
14,304,901,000
22,740,935,000
12,094,264,000
Increase
5,542,180,000
8,466,397,000
4,981,012,000
% Increase
61%
62%
58%
http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/statetables/index.html
AYP & School Choice
School Choice:
ÏSchool has not met AYP for two consecutive
years or longer
ÏLEA’s must notify parents
AYP & Supplemental Educational Services
Supplemental Educational Services:
ÏSchool has not met AYP for three
consecutive years or longer
ÏLEA’s must notify parents about providers
and if their child qualifies
AYP & Parental Influence
Two of most powerful vehicles through which parents can
exert their influence are school choice and the selection of
supplemental educational services. The implementation of
these provisions by LEAs requires significant communication
with parents to let parents know of their options, assess
parents’ preferences, and initiate the school choice or
supplemental educational services.
A comparably high level of involvement is required at each
succeeding stage of school improvement, as a persistently
failing school moves through corrective action to
restructuring.
High-Quality Teachers
Ï All teachers in core academic subject areas
teaching at schools receiving Title I funds must be
highly qualified
Ï Title I funds and other federal program funds can be
combined to provide teacher training and
professional development
Ï Parents may request to know the teacher
qualifications and schools must inform parents if a
teacher in a core subject area is not highly qualified
Parental Involvement
ÏThere are a number of key stakeholders in a
school’s success and student achievement:
administrators, teachers, and community
members, but parents are paramount
Parental Involvement (cont’d)
ÏNCLB requires that school districts and campuses
notify parents about student progress, school report
cards and AYP, school improvement where
applicable, highly qualified staff, and annual meetings
ÏNCLB also requires that parents be consulted in the
development of the schoolwide plan, parental
involvement policy and compact, and at the time of
the consolidated application
Creating Safer Schools
ÏSchool must address local needs and parents
must be involved in developing programs
where violence, gangs, and drugs are not
present
ÏSchools must continuously monitor and
evaluate the effectiveness of its programs
ÏA student that has been the victim of
a violent crime on school property or students
that attend a “persistently dangerous school”
will be offered school choice
Doing What Works
ÏSound scientific research is the basis for instructional
decisions
Ï“Research that involves the application of rigorous,
systematic, and objective procedures to obtain reliable
and valid knowledge relevant to education activities and
programs.” 9101(B)(37)
ÏFederal support is targeted to those educational programs
that have demonstrated to be effective through rigorous
scientific research, which means there is reliable evidence
that the program or practice works
The Benefits of an Effective
Parental Involvement
Program
Higher Student Achievement
ÏStudents achieve more, regardless of socio-economic
status, ethnic/racial background, or the parents’
education level
ÏStudents have higher test grades and test scores, better
attendance, and complete homework more consistently
ÏStudents have higher graduation rates and greater
enrollment rates in postsecondary education
ÏStudent achievement for disadvantaged students
improves dramatically, reaching levels that are standard
for middle-class children
Improved Student Behavior
ÏStudents exhibit more positive attitude
and behavior
ÏStudents have more self-confidence
and feel school is more important
ÏStudent behaviors such as alcohol
use, violence, and other antisocial
behaviors decrease
Bridging the Cultural Gap
ÏChildren from diverse cultural backgrounds tend to
do better when parents and professionals work
together to bridge the cultural gap between home and
school
ÏThe school’s practices to inform and involve parents
are stronger determinants of whether inner-city
parents will be involved in their children’s education
than are parent education, family size, and marital
status
Bridging the Cultural Gap (cont’d)
ÏSuccessful schools engage families from diverse
backgrounds, build trust and collaboration,
recognize, respect and address family needs, and
develop a partnership where power and
responsibility is shared
ÏFor low-income families, programs offered in the
community or at church or through home visits are
more successful than programs requiring parents to
come to the school
Students of All Ages Benefit
ÏParental involvement clearly
benefits students in the early years,
but continued parental involvement
shows significant gains at all ages
and all grade levels
ÏJunior and senior high school
students make better transitions,
maintain the quality of their work,
and develop realistic plans for the
future
School Quality
ÏSchools with parent-teacher groups have higher student
achievement
ÏSchool experience improved teacher morale and higher
ratings of teachers by parents
ÏWhen schools are held accountable, school districts make
positive changes that include securing resources and
funding to improve the curriculum and provide after school
and family support programs
ÏSchools have more support from families and better
reputations in the community
A Primary Vision:
Building Capacity for
Parental Involvement
Building Capacity for Parental
Involvement
To ensure the effective involvement of parents to
improve student academic achievement, each school
and LEA:
ÏShall provide assistance to parents in understanding
the State’s academic content standards and
academic achievement standards, State and local
assessments, how to monitor a child’s progress, and
how to work with educators to improve student
achievement - Section1118(e)(1)
Building Capacity for Parental Involvement
(cont’d)
ÏShall provide materials and training to help parents
work with their children to improve student
achievement – Section 1118(e)(2)
ÏShall educate teachers and school personnel with
the assistance of parents, in the value and utility of
contributions of parents, and in how to reach out to,
communicate with, and work with parents as equal
partners, implement and coordinate parent
programs, and build ties between parents and the
school – Section 1118(e)(3)
Building Capacity for Parental Involvement
(cont’d)
ÏShall coordinate and integrate parental involvement
programs and activities with other programs – Section
1118(e)(4)
ÏShall ensure that information related to school and
parent programs, meetings, and other activities is sent
to the parents in a format and language the parents
can understand – Section 1118(e)(5)
ÏShall provide other reasonable support for parental
involvement activities – Section 1118(e)(14)
Building Capacity for Parental Involvement
(cont’d)
ÏMay involve parents in the development of training for
teachers – Section 1118(e)(6)
ÏMay provide necessary literacy training – Section
1118(e)(7)
ÏMay pay reasonable expenses associated with local
parental involvement activities – Section 1118(e)(8)
ÏMay train parents to enhance the involvement of other
parents – Section 1118(e)(9)
Building Capacity for Parental Involvement
(cont’d)
ÏMay arrange school meetings at a variety of times or
conduct in-home conferences – Section 1118(e)(10)
ÏMay adopt model approaches to improving parental
involvement – Section 1118(e)(11)
ÏMay establish a districtwide parental advisory council –
Section 1118(e)(12)
ÏMay develop appropriate roles for community-based
organizations in parental involvement activities –
Section 1118(e)(13)
Elementary and Secondary Education
P.L. (Public Law) 107-110, Part A – Improving Basic Programs Operated
by Local Educational Agencies, Subpart 1 – Basic Program Requirements
www.ed.gov/policy/elsec/leg/esea02/index.html
Section 1120A.
Fiscal Requirements
Section 1111.
State Plans
Section 1112.
Section 1120.
Local Educational Agency Plans
Participation of Children
Enrolled in Private Schools
Section 1119.
Qualifications for Teachers
and Paraprofessionals
Section 1113.
Eligible School Attendance Areas
PL 107-110
Section 1114.
Schoolwide Programs
Section 1118.
Section 1115.
Parental Involvement
Targeted Assistance Schools
Section 1117.
Section 1116.
School Support and Recognition
Academic Assessment and Local
Educational Agency and School
Improvement
NCLB Parental
Involvement Requirements
Schoolwide Program
The schoolwide program shall include:
ÏHigh-quality and ongoing professional development for
teachers and…if appropriate for parents to enable all
children to meet the state’s student academic
achievement standards – 1114(b)(1)(D)
ÏStrategies to increase parental involvement in accordance
with Section 1118 – 1114(b)(1)(F)
ÏA plan to provide the individual student academic
assessment results to parents including an interpretation
of those results – 1114(b)(2)(A)(iv)
Schoolwide Program (cont’d)
ÏA comprehensive plan developed with the
involvement of parents that includes a
comprehensive needs assessment and addresses
the ten components of a schoolwide program –
1114(b)(2)(B)(ii)
ÏInformation to parents and schools of the ability to
consolidate funds from Federal, State, and local
sources – 1111(c)(1)(A)
Targeted Assistance Schools
The targeted assistance school program shall include:
ÏThe means to identify children not older than 21, who
are not at grade level, who are failing or at risk of
failing the state’s academic achievement standards.
Children in preschool through grade 2 shall be
identified on the basis of teacher judgment, interviews
with parents, and developmentally appropriate
measures – 1115(b)(1)(A)&(B)
Targeted Assistance Schools (cont’d)
ÏOpportunities for professional development for
teachers…and if appropriate for parents who work
with participating students in this program –
1115(c)(1)(F)
ÏStrategies to increase parental involvement in
accordance with Section 1118 – 1115(c)(1)(G)
School Support Teams
Ï The SEA shall establish a statewide system
of intensive and sustained support and
improvement for LEA’s and schools. The
statewide system can include School Support
Teams composed of knowledgeable persons
including parents – 1117(a)(5)(A)(iii)
Ï Each school support team assigned to a
school shall collaborate with parents…in the
design, implementation, and monitoring of a
plan – 1117(a)(5)(B)(ii)
Notification
Language and Format
Information regarding student interpretive,
descriptive, and diagnostic reports, plans,
policy, compact, parent meetings, and other
required correspondence should be given in
an understandable and uniform format, and
to the extent practicable, in a language that
parents can understand – 1111(b)(3)(C)(xii);
1111(h)(6)(C); 1112(c)(1)(N); 1112(g)(2);
1114(b)(2)(B)(iv); 1116(b)(3)(A)(vi);
1116(b)(6); 1116(b)(7)(E)(ii); 1116(c)(6);
1116(e)(2)(A)
Parents Right-to-Know:
Professional Qualifications
At the beginning of each school year the LEA shall notify
the parents that they may request and the LEA will
provide information regarding the professional
qualifications of the teacher, including:
ÏWhether the teacher has met state qualification and
licensing criteria
Parents Right-to-Know: Professional
Qualifications (cont’d)
ÏWhether the teacher is teaching under
emergency or provisional status
ÏThe baccalaureate degree major of the teacher
and other graduate certification
ÏWhether the child is provided services by a
paraprofessional – 1111(h)(6)(A)(i-iv)
EXAMPLE
Parent Notification
Compliance with P.L. 107-110, Section 1111(h)(6)(A)
To:
From:
Date:
Subject:
All Parents
[insert school district name]
[insert date]
Notification to Parents of Teacher Qualifications
As a parent of a student at [insert school name], you have the right to know the
professional qualifications of the classroom teachers who instruct your child. Federal law
allows you to ask for certain information about your child's classroom teachers, and
requires you to receive this information in a timely manner. Specifically, you have the
right to ask for the following information about each of your child's classroom teachers:
• Whether [insert name of your state's department of education] has licensed or qualified the teacher
for the grades and subjects he or she teaches.
• Whether [insert name of your state's department of education] has decided that the teacher can
teach in a classroom without being licensed or qualified under state regulations because of special
circumstances.
• The teacher's college major; whether the teacher has any advanced degrees and, if so, the subject
of the degrees.
• Whether any teachers' aides or similar paraprofessionals provide services to your child and their
qualifications.
If you would like to receive any of this information, please call [insert name] at [insert
telephone number].
EXAMPLE
Notification a los Padres
Cumplimiento de la Ley Publica 107-110, Seccion 1111(h)(6)(A)
A:
De:
Fecha:
Materia:
Todos los padres de familia
[insert name of school district]
[insert date]
Notificacion a los padres de familia sobre calificaciones de maestros
Como padre de un alumno en [insert name of school], Ud. tiene el derecho de conocer
las calificaciones profesionales de los maestros que enseñan a su hijo, y la ley federal
requiere que el distrito escolar le facilite esta información oportuna si Ud. la pide.
Específicamente, Ud. tiene el derecho de pedir la siguiente información acerca de cada
uno de los maestros de su hijo:
• Si el maestro cumple las calificaciones y criterios de la certificación estatal para los grados y
materias que enseña.
• Si el maestro tiene el título provisional o de emergencia debido a circunstancias especiales.
• Si el maestro tiene título de postgrado en el currículo que se especializa.
• Si los auxiliar de los profesionales tienen las calificaciones esenciales para ofrecer los servicios a
su hijo.
Si Ud. quiere recibir esta información, puede comunicar con [insert name of contact
person] al [insert telephone number].
Parents Right to Know: Highly Qualified
Status of Teacher
The LEA shall notify the parents that the child has
been taught for four or more consecutive weeks by
a teacher who is not highly qualified –
1111(h)(6)(B)(ii)
EXAMPLE
Parent Notification
Compliance with P.L. 107-110, Section 1111(h)(6)(B)
To:
From:
Date:
Subject:
All Parents
[insert school district name]
[insert date]
Notification to Parents of Teachers not “Highly Qualified”
As a parent of a student at [insert school name], you have the right to know if your child
has been assigned or has been taught for four or more consecutive weeks by a teacher
who does not meet the Federal requirements of “highly qualified.” According to the No
Child Left Behind Act of 2001 [P.L. 107-110, Section 9505(23)], a highly qualified teacher
is one who:
• Has obtained a Bachelor’s degree
• Has demonstrated competency in the subject area assigned to teach
• Has obtained full State certification as a teacher or has passed the State teacher licensing
examination; and
• Has not had certification or licensure requirements waived on an emergency, temporary, or
provisional basis.
This notice is to inform you that your child has been assigned to or taught by the following
teacher(s) who does not currently meet these requirements:
[insert teachers by name]
If you have any questions regarding this notice, please contact [insert contact person’s
name] at [insert telephone number].
EXAMPLE
Notificación a los Padres
Cumplimiento de la Ley Pública 107-110, Sección
1111(h)(6)(B)
A:
Todos los padres de familia
De:
[insert name of school district]
Fecha: [insert date]
Materia: Notificación a los padres de familia sobre maestros no “altamente calificados”
Como padre de un alumno en [insert name of school], Ud. tiene el derecho de saber si a
su hijo le hayan asignado al programa federal, o haya recibido enseñanza por cuatro
semanas consecutivas o más por un maestro que no cumple los requisitos federales por
ser “bien calificado.” Según la ley “No Child Left Behind” de 2001 [Ley Pública 107-110,
Sección 9505(23)], un maestro bien calificado es uno que
• Ha obtenido su Licenciatura;
• Ha demostrado competencia en la materia que enseña;
• Ha conseguido la certificación estatal de maestría, o que ha sido aprobado por un examen estatal
de certificación; y
• No ha recibido una exención de los requisitos para cumplir la certificación u obtenido la licencia
sobre bases provisionales, temporales, o de emergencia.
Esta noticia es para informarle a Ud. que a su hijo le han designado, o ha recibido
enseñanza por, el(los) siguiente(s) maestro(s) que en la actualidad no cumple (n) estos
requisitos:
[insert teachers by name]
Si Ud. Tiene alguna pregunta sobre esta noticia, puede comunicar con [insert name of
contact person] al [insert telephone number].
Parents Right to Know:
Results
AYP
School districts must disseminate to parents,
teachers, principals, schools and community the
results of the LEA’s annual yearly progress
review of each school – 1116(a)(1)(C);
1116(c)(1)(B); 1116(c)(6)
Parents Right to Know: Report Cards
The SEA shall prepare and disseminate an
annual report that is concise, understandable,
and in a language parents can understand –
1111(h)(1)(B)
The LEA shall publicly disseminate an annual
report card to schools and parents in an
understandable and uniform format and in a
language parents can understand –
1111(h)(2)(E)
Parents Right to Know: Student
Achievement
The SEA shall produce individual student
interpretive, descriptive, and diagnostic reports
that allow parents to understand and address
the specific academic needs of students –
1111(b)(3)(C)(xii) & (xv)
The LEA shall provide to parents information on
the level achievement of the child in each of the
state academic assessments – 1111(h)(6)(B)(i);
1112(c)(1)(N)
Parents Right to Know:
Student Achievement (cont’d)
Ï Schools must provide to parents a description and
explanation of the curriculum, the forms of
academic assessment, and the expected
proficiency levels – 1118(c)(4)(B)
Ï Schools must provide frequent reports to parents
on their children’s progress – 1118(d)(2)(B)
Homeless Children
A child who is homeless and attending a targeted
assistance school is eligible to receive services –
1115(b)(2)(E)
When a child is homeless and attending a LEA receiving
Title I, Part A funds, the LEA is required to provide Title I,
Part A services to that student – Section
722(g)(6)(A)(iv,vii)
School Improvement
Parents Right to Know: School
Improvement
The LEA shall promptly provide to parents:
ÏAn explanation of what the identification means
ÏThe reasons for the identification
ÏAn explanation of what the school is doing to address
the problem of low achievement
ÏAn explanation of what the LEA or SEA is doing to help
the school
Parents Right to Know:
Improvement (cont’d)
School
ÏAn explanation of how the parents can become
involved in addressing the academic issues at hand
ÏAn explanation of the parents’ options to transfer
their child to another public school – 1116(b)(6)(AF)
ÏIf a majority of the parents believe the proposed
identification is in error the principal may provide
supporting evidence to the LEA – 1116(b)(2)(B)
School Improvement
ÏThe LEA shall provide all students enrolled in a
school identified for school improvement the option to
transfer to another public school served by the LEA
that has not been identified for school improvement,
and this notice must be provided not later than the
first day of the school year following the identification.
(1116.b.1.E)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏEach school shall develop or revise a school plan in
consultation with parents – 1116(b)(3)(A) &
1116(c)(7)(A)
ÏThe plan shall describe how the school will provide
written notice about the identification to parents –
1116(b)(3)(A)(vi)
ÏThe plan shall include strategies to promote
effective parental involvement in the school –
1116(c)(7)(A)(viii)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏThe LEA shall provide annual notice to parents about:
¾
the availability of supplemental education services
¾
the identity of approved providers
¾
a brief description of the services, qualifications,
and demonstrated effectiveness of providers –
1116(e)(2)(A)
ÏThe LEA shall, if requested, provide assistance to
parents in choosing a provider – 1116(e)(2)(B)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏWhen a parent selects an approved provider the
LEA shall develop in consultation with the
parents and the provider an agreement for:
¾specific goals for the student
¾how student progress will be measured
¾a timetable for improvement
School Improvement (cont’d)
¾ how parents and teachers will be informed of
student progress
¾ a termination clause
¾ a method of payment
¾ a clause that prevents the release of student
identification by the provider without the written
permission of the parents – 1116(e)(3)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏThe SEA shall promote maximum
participation by providers to ensure
parents have as many choices as
possible and maintain an updated list of
providers – 1116(e)(4)
ÏThe SES provider shall provide
information to parents in a format and
language the parents can understand –
1116(e)(5)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏThe LEA shall publish and disseminate to the public
and to parents information regarding the corrective
action the LEA pursues – 1116(b)(7)(E)(i)
ÏThe LEA shall provide prompt notice to teachers
and parents whenever a school is subject to
restructuring and alternative governance
1116(b)(8)(C)(i); and the LEA shall provide teachers
and parents with an adequate opportunity to
comment before taking any action and to participate
in developing a plan – 1116(b)(8)(C)(ii)
School Improvement (cont’d)
ÏThe SEA shall publicize and disseminate to
parents…the results of the state review and the
reasons for the LEA to be identified for
improvement and how parents can participate
in upgrading the quality of the LEA –
1116(c)(1)(B) & 1116(c)(6) & 1116(c)(10)(E)
Parents Right to Know: Student Participation in Language
Instruction Educational Program Title III, Part C
The LEA shall inform a parent of a limited English
proficient child identified for participation in a language
instruction education program:
ÏThe reasons for identification of the child
ÏThe child’s level of English proficiency
ÏThe methods of instruction used in the
program
ÏHow the program will meet the child’s needs
Parents Right to Know: Student Participation in Language
Instruction Education Program
Title III, Part C (cont’d)
ÏHow the program will help the child learn English
ÏThe specific exit requirements
ÏInformation pertaining to children with disabilities
ÏInformation pertaining to parental rights
ÏHow the program meets the objectives of the child’s
IEP – 1112(g)(1)(A)(i-viii)
Parents Right to Know: Student Participation in Language
Instruction Education Program
Title III, Part C (cont’d)
As a separate notification, the LEA shall inform
the parent that the LEA has failed to make
progress on the annual measurable
achievement objectives in the language
instruction educational program – 1112(g)(1)(B)
The LEA shall implement an effective means of
outreach to parents of limited English proficient
students to inform the parents how they can be
involved in the education of their child –
1112(g)(4)
Victim of a Violent Crime or Persistently
Dangerous School
Parents must be notified that a student is allowed to
transfer to a safe public school or charter school
within the district if the student is a victim of a
violent crime in or on the grounds of a public school
OR if the student is enrolled at a campus identified
as a “persistently dangerous school” – Section
9532(a)
Consultation
Parental Involvement
Policy
Parental Involvement Policy: LEA
Each LEA that receives funds shall develop a written
policy that:
ÏIs developed jointly with, agreed on with, and
distributed to parents, and it shall be incorporated into
the LEA plan
ÏProvides the coordination, technical assistance, and
other support in planning and implementing effective
parental involvement activities to improve student
academic achievement and student performance
Parental Involvement Policy: LEA (cont’d)
ÏBuilds the schools’ and parents’ capacity for strong
parental involvement
ÏCoordinates and integrates parental involvement
strategies at the school with other programs
ÏConducts, with the involvement of parents, an annual
evaluation of the effectiveness of the parental
involvement policy…and use the findings to devise new
strategies and revise the parental involvement policies
ÏInvolves parents in the activities of the school –
1118(a)(2)(A-F)
Parental Involvement Policy: Campus
Each school shall develop a written parental involvement
policy that:
ÏIs jointly developed with and distributed to parents –
1118(b)(1)
ÏConvenes an annual meeting at a convenient time to
inform parents of the school’s participation and
requirements in the Title I, Part A program and the
parents’ right to be involved – 1118(c)(1)
ÏOffers a flexible number of meetings – 1118(c)(2)
Parental Involvement Policy: Campus (cont’d)
ÏInvolve parents in an ongoing and organized way in
the planning, review, and improvement of the
parental involvement policy and the schoolwide
program plan – 1118(c)(3)
Parental Involvement Policy: Campus (cont’d)
ÏProvides parents timely information about programs; a
description of the curriculum and the forms of
academic assessment; and expected proficiency
levels; and if requested, opportunities for regular
meetings to formulate suggestions and to participate
in decisions relating to the education of their children –
1118(c)(4)
ÏAllows parents to express their dissatisfaction with the
schoolwide program plan and submit their comments
to the LEA – 1118(c)(5)
Parental Involvement Policy: Campus (cont’d)
ÏHas as a component of the plan a
school-parent compact – 1118(d )
ÏBuilds the capacity for effective
involvement of parents to improve
student academic achievement –
1118(e)
ÏProvides opportunities for parents with
limited English proficiency, disabilities,
and parents of migratory children to
participate – 1118(f)
Written Parental Involvement Policy
Each LEA must develop and distribute to parents a written
parental involvement policy saying how it will support the
involvement of parents. ED’s parental involvement guidance
from 2004 provides a helpful sample template of an acceptable
district-wide parental involvement policy, although federal law
does not mandate a specific format. This policy must be
developed jointly with parents and agreed upon by them.
The policy becomes part of the LEA plan submitted to the state.
(If parents object to the LEA’s overall plan, their comments must
be included when the LEA submits its plan to the SEA.) If an
LEA has a parental involvement plan for all parents, the LEA may
simply amend that plan to meet the Title I standard.
Written Parental Involvement Policy (cont’d)
The only significant change to the mandate for an LEA-level
parental involvement policy relates to the requirement for an
annual review of the parental involvement plan to determine
its effectiveness. Under the old law, this review focused on
the plan’s success in increasing parental involvement;
under the new law, the review will focus on whether the
parental involvement plan increased the academic quality
of the school.
Source: The New Title I: The Changing Landscape of Accountability, March 2005 by K. Cowan and C. Edwards. Reprinted with permission © Thompson Publishing Group Inc.
__________ INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT
Parent Involvement Program
Sample Campus Parent Involvement Policy
The ____________ School will involve parents in the joint development of the Title I plan
and the process of school review and improvement.
An adequate number of parents will work collaboratively with ____________ School
committee in an organized, ongoing, and timely way, in the planning, review, and
improvement of the Title I program. (Examples: Parent Advisory, Title Advisory)
Annually the school will convene a meeting to which all parents of participating students
are invited to inform the parents of the school’s participation in the Title I program and of
the parents’ right to be involved. (Parent Goals Night, Parent-Teacher Conferences,
Assessment Overview/Explanation Night)
Parents will be provided timely information about available programs. (Newsletters,
flyers, television)
Parents will be provided with the school performance profiles and assistance with
interpreting their child’s individual assessment results. (Parent Goals Night, ParentTeacher Conferences, Assessment Overview/Explanation Night)
Parents will be provided a description and explanation of the curriculum in use at the
school, the forms of assessment used to measure student progress, and the proficient
levels students are expected to meet. (Parent Goals Night)
__________ INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT
Parent Involvement Program
Sample Campus Parent Involvement Policy (cont.)
Parents will be provided with opportunities for regular meetings to formulate suggestions,
share experiences with other parents, and to participate in decisions relating to the
education of their children. (Advisory, Campus/District Meetings)
Parents will receive a timely response to their suggestions.
The school will coordinate, provide technical assistance, and other support necessary to
assist parents in actively participating in the planning and implementing of a parent
involvement program. (Parent Advisory Council Team)
Parent Involvement will be coordinated and integrated with the parent involvement
strategies of other programs such as Head Start Program, Reading First Program, Early
First Reading program, Even Start Program, Parents as Teachers Program, and Home
Instruction Program for Preschool Youngsters, and State Preschool Programs.
Parents will jointly conduct an evaluation of the content and effectiveness of the parental
involvement policy and revise as necessary. (Fall and Spring Advisory Meetings)
School-Parent Compact
School-Parent Compact
Each school shall develop a written school-parent
compact that:
ÏIs jointly developed with parents
ÏOutlines how parents, school staff, and children share
the responsibility for improved student academic
achievement – describing the school’s responsibility to
provide high-quality curriculum and instruction and the
ways each parent will be responsible for supporting
their child’s learning
School-Parent Compact (cont’d)
ÏAddresses the importance of communication
between teachers and parents –
¾annual parent-teacher conference in elementary
schools
¾frequent reports to parents on children’s progress
¾reasonable access to staff, including opportunities
to volunteer and/or observe classroom activity –
1118(d)
REQUIRED: An annual parent-teacher
conference in the elementary school during
which the compact shall be discussed as it
relates to the child’s individual achievement.
School-Parent Compact
[Public law 107-110 Section 1118(d)]
One of the major innovations in the 1994 law was a
mandate for school-parent compacts. These compacts set
out the respective responsibilities of the school staff, parents
and students in striving to raise student achievement and
explain how an effective home-school partnership will be
developed.
School-Parent Compact (cont’d)
[Public law 107-110 Section 1118(d)]
Schools must develop compacts jointly with parents. The
compact must describe the school’s responsibility for providing a
high-quality curriculum in a supportive and effective learning
environment. The compact also must describe the way parents
will support their children’s learning. These might include
strategies such as monitoring homework completion, television
time, and attendance; volunteering in their children’s classrooms;
and participating, as appropriate, in decisions relating to the
education of their children and the positive use of their
extracurricular time. If interested in helping the school district
develop or update the existing School-Parent Compacts, contact
your local district.
Source: The New Title I: The Changing Landscape of Accountability, March 2005 by K. Cowan and C. Edwards. Reprinted with permission © Thompson Publishing Group Inc.
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State, District and
Campus Plans
State Education Agency Plans
ÏThe SEA shall submit to the Secretary a plan,
developed by the SEA, in consultation with…parents –
1111(a)(1)
ÏThe state plan shall describe how the
SEA will provide information to LEA’s
and schools regarding effective
parental involvement practices that
increase student achievement and
lower barriers to parental involvement
– 1111(d)(1&2)
Local Education Agency Plans
ÏThe LEA plan shall include a description of how
teachers, in consultation with parents…will
identify children most in need of services in
targeted assistance schools – 1112(b)(1)(H)
ÏThe LEA plan shall describe the strategy to
implement effective parental involvement –
1112(b)(1)(P)
ÏThe LEA plan shall be developed in consultation
with…parents – 1112(d)(1); 1114(b)(2)(B)(ii)
Campus Plans
A school that operates a schoolwide or targeted assistance
program shall develop a comprehensive plan with the
involvement of parents that includes a comprehensive needs
assessment of the entire school and addresses the
schoolwide reform strategies (or ten components) – 1114(b)
(1)(A) and (B), 1114(b)(2)(A)(i) and (B)(ii)
Parents Right to be Consulted:
Consolidated Application
Parents must be consulted prior to the application
being completed regarding…
ÏTitle I Program Plan – 1112(d)(1)
ÏTitle II Application and Needs Assessment – 2122(b)
ÏTitle IV Application – 4114(c)(1)(A), 4114(c)(2)
ÏTitle V Application – 5133(b)(7)
Reservation of Funds
Reservation of Funds
ÏIf the LEA’s Title I, Part A entitlement is $500,000
or more, the LEA must reserve not less that 1%
for parental involvement activities, including
promoting family literacy and parenting skills
ÏParents shall be involved in the decisions
regarding how reserved funds are allotted for
parental involvement activities
ÏNot less than 95% of the reserved funds shall be
distributed to schools – 1118(a)(3)(A-C)
Reservation of Funds
(Example)
Entitlement
1% Reserve
95% to School
$500,000
$5,000
$4,750
$600,000
$6,000
$5,700
$750,000
$7,500
$7,125
Ice Breakers and Parental
Involvement Activities
BALLOONS
Children are like this balloon with a message inside.
They start out small and we inflate them with something of ourselves.
As we pour our lives into them-they spread sunshine and give joy.
They remind us of being young and that life is fragile.
They celebrate living.
When discouraged, they are like a balloon that deflates.
A simple openness allows us to refill them...
With hope for the future,
A feeling that they are special,
And the knowledge that they are loved.
Their enthusiasm is like a balloon
Carried on the wind with never ending energy.
They need our support and loving guidance,
without the wrong kind of pressure
that might cause them to burst.
When filled with courage, a sense of connections,
and the knowledge that they count, they will soar high into the air
when the string is out.
BUT TOO MANY NEVER MAKE IT OFF THE GROUND
GLOBOS
Los niños son como este globo con un mensaje adentro.
Comienzan pequeño y lo inflamos con algo de nosotros mismos.
Mientras que veremos nuestras vidas en ellos Dan la luz del sol y alegría.
Nos recuerdan ser jóvenes y que la vida es frágil.
Ellos celebran la vida.
Cuando están desalentados, son como un globo que se desinfla
Una franqueza simple permite que los rellenemos...
Con la esperanza del futuro, Con la sensación de que son especiales,
y reconocer que son amados.
Su entusiasmo es como un globo, Que lo lleva el viento
Con una energía continua.
Necesitan de nuestro apoyo, sin mucha presión que los pueda hacer estallar.
cuando están llenos de valor, y con un sentido de conexíon,
y con el conocimiento con el que cuentan, se elevarán en el aire cuando
la cuerda se ha caído.
PERO MUCHOS NUNCA SE LEVANTAN DEL SUELO
Even Eagles
Need A Push
The eagle gently coaxed her offspring toward the edge of the nest. Her heart
quivered with conflicting emotions as she felt their resistance to her persistent
nudging. “Why does the thrill of soaring have to begin with the fear of falling?”
she thought. This ageless question was still unanswered for her.
As in tradition of the species, her nest was located high on the shelf of a sheer
rock face. Below there was nothing but air to support the wings of each child.
“Is it possible that this time it will not work?” she thought. Despite her fears, the
eagle knew it was time, her parental mission was all but complete. There
remained one final task – THE PUSH.
The eagle drew courage from an innate wisdom. Until her children discovered
their wings, there was no purpose for their lives outside the nest. Until they
learned to soar, they would fail to understand the privilege it was to have been
born an eagle. The push was the greatest gift she had to offer. It was her
supreme act of love. And so, one by one, she pushed them and they flew.
We must remember that success begins when we understand that life is about
growing; it is about acquiring the knowledge and skills we need to live more
fully and effectively.
También Las Águilas
Necesitan Un Empujón
El águila convenció suavemente a sus aguiluchos hacia el borde del nido. Su
corazón tembló con un conflicto de emociones mientras sentia la resistencia a su
persistente empujón. “¿Por qué es que la emoción de volar alto tiene que empezar
con el miedo de caer?” se preguntó a si misma. Ella no pudo encontrar la respuesta
a esa pregunta eternal.
Como en la tradición de las especies, el nido se encontraba ubicado muy alto
en la cordillera al lado de unas piedras. Debajo no había nada excepto el aire para
apoyar las alas de cada uno de sus hijos. “¿Es posible qué esta vez no funcionara?”
pensó la mamá águila. A pesar de sus temores, el águila sabia que ya era tiempo,
su misión como madre estaba por terminar. Nada más faltó una tarea final-EL
EMPUJÓN.
El águila agarro valor de su sabiduría natural. Hasta que sus hijos
descubrieron sus alas, no habría un propósito para una vida afuera del nido. Hasta
que aprendieron a volar, no podrían entender el privilegio a haber nacido águila. El
empujόn fue el regalo más grande que la mamá pudo ofrecer. Era su acto supremo
del amor. Entonces, uno por uno, ella los empujó y volaron.
Tenemos que recordar que el éxito comienza cuando entendemos que la vida
se trata del desarrollo; se trata de adquirir el conocimiento y las destrezas que
necesitamos para vivir una vida más amplia y eficaz.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE YEAR:
ASK A STUDENT WHO JUST FAILED HIS FINAL EXAM.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE MONTH:
ASK A MOTHER WHO HAS GIVEN BIRTH TO A PREMATURE BABY.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE WEEK:
ASK AN EDITOR OF A WEEKLY NEWSPAPER.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE DAY:
ASK A DAILY WAGE LABORER WHO HAS 10 KIDS TO FEED.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE HOUR:
ASK TWO PEOPLE IN LOVE WHO ARE WAITING TO MEET.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE SECOND:
ASK A PERSON WHO HAS JUST SURVIVED AN ACCIDENT.
TO REALIZE THE VALUE OF ONE MILLISECOND:
ASK A PERSON WHO HAS WON A SILVER MEDAL IN THE OLYMPICS.
TIME WAITS FOR NO ONE. TREASURE EVERY MOMENT YOU
HAVE. YOU WILL TREASURE IT EVEN MORE WHEN YOU CAN
SHARE IT WITH YOUR CHILD.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un año:
PREGÚNTELE AL ALUMNO QUE ACABA DE REPROBAR SU EXAMEN FINAL.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un mes:
PREGÚNTELE A LA MAMÁ QUE DIO A LUZ A UN BEBÉ PREMATURO.
Para darse cuenta del valor de una semana:
PREGÚNTELE AL EDITÓR DE UN PERIODICO SEMANAL.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un día:
PREGÚNTELE AL TRABAJADOR QUE RECIBE UN SALARIO POR DÍA QUE TIENE 10 HIJOS
QUE ALIMENTAR.
Para darse cuenta del valor de una hora:
PREGÚNTELE A DOS ENAMORADOS QUE ESPERAN REUNIRSE.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un minuto:
PREGÚNTELE A UNA PERSONA QUE PERDIÓ EL TREN, EL CAMIÓN, O EL AVIÓN.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un segundo:
PREGÚNTELE A UNA PERSONA QUE SOBREVIVIÓ UN ACCIDENTE.
Para darse cuenta del valor de un milisegundo:
PREGÚNTELE A UNA PERSONA QUE GANÓ UNA MEDALLA DE PLATA EN LAS OLIMPIADAS.
EL TIEMPO NO ESPERA A NADIE. VALORE USTED CADA
MOMENTO QUE TENGA. USTED LO VALORARÁ AUN MÁS CUANDO
USTED PUEDE COMPARTIRLO CON SU HIJO.
Hot Buttons to Parental
Involvement Resources
Parent Involvement Promising Programs
Boys Town Press
www.girlsandboystown.org
Dr. Dorothy Rich – Mega Skills
www.megaskillshsi.org
Compass Learning Parent Modules
www.compasslearning.com
HIPPY
www.hippyusa.org
“I Care” Positive
Parenting Curriculum
www.icarenow.com
Love and Logic
www.loveandlogic.com
Family Frameworks
www.parentinvolvementnetwork.org
Parent Involvement Promising Programs
National / State PTAs
www.pta.org
National / State
Fatherhood Initiative
www.fathers.com
Parent Institute
www.par-inst.com
Passports to Success – “Parents
Assuring Student Success”
www.solution-tree.com
Parents as Teachers
www.patnc.org
Practical Parent Education
www.practicalparent.org
Dr. Joyce Epstein – School, Family, and Community
Partnerships: Preparing Educators and Improving Schools
www.westviewpress.com
Parent Involvement Promising Programs
Title I Statewide School Support Initiation at Region 16 ESC
http://www.esc16.net/dept/isserv/title1swi/
Want to print this PowerPoint?
Go to www.esc16.net
Click on “Title I Statewide School Support/Parental
Involvement Initiative”
Click on “Requested Materials”
Click on “Parental Involvement Requirements for NCLB
Programs”
Questions?
Terri Stafford, (806) 677-5126, [email protected]
Skip Forsyth (806) 677-5186, [email protected]
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