Math 141 Gillespie - Heartland Community College

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Heartland Community College
Math / Science
Course Syllabus for Students
Summer 2010
Course Prefix and Number:
Course Title:
Math 141- 02
Introduction to Statistics
Credit Hours:
4 Lecture Hours
Days and times the course meets:
Mon, Tue, Wed, Thurs.
June 1 – July 27, 2010
2 – 3:50 P.M.
Room 1103
Introduction: Statistics is used in every walk of life, enabling life-long learners to make
informed decisions. Exposure to basic statistical ideas and experience in gathering,
analyzing, and interpreting data opens the door for a variety of future applications.
Catalog Description:
Prerequisite: MATH 096 or MATH 099 with grade of "C" or higher, or assessment and MATH
098 (or at least one year of high school geometry with a "C" or higher). A course in statistics
that introduces various topics in probability and statistics, and demonstrates a variety of real
life applications. Some of the topics covered are sampling techniques and simulation, data
organization, distributions, measure of central tendency and variability, probability, estimation,
and hypothesis testing. A graphing calculator is required for this course (instruction will
be based on a T1 83+).
Textbook: Elementary Statistics (using the TI-83/84 Plus Calculators), 2nd Ed., Triola
REQUIRED:
TI-83 or 84 Calculator
REQUIRED:
MyMathLab
Supplies:
Graph paper, straight edge
Websites:
GSS
MyMathLab:
Instructor Information
Instructor name:
e-mail address:
office:
Phone number:
Office hours:
Gillespie
Summer 2010
http://sda.berkeley.edu/GSS
www.coursecompass.com
gillespie06447
Kathryn Gillespie
[email protected]
ICB 2400
310-4639
After class and by appointment
(I teach in room 2707 from 12 -1:50)
-1-
Relationship to Academic Development Programs and Transfer:
The course is intended for students who want an introduction to statistics, including
experience in gathering and analyzing data. This course is also intended for students
fulfilling 4 credit hours in Mathematics as partial fulfillment for completion of the A.A.
Degree or the A.S. Degree. This course is NOT intended for students requiring a precalculus statistics course for a business major or for students majoring in mathematics.
MATH 141 should transfer as part of the General Education Core Curriculum
described in the Illinois Articulation Initiative to other Illinois colleges and universities
participating in the IAI. However, students should consult an academic advisor for
transfer information regarding particular institutions. Refer to the IAI web page for
information as well at www.itransfer.org
Course Objectives (Learning Outcomes):
After completing this course the student should be able to achieve the following outcomes.
The level of these outcomes is based on problem solving abilities (PS2).
1.
Organize and present data using statistical charts and graphs (e.g., histograms, stem
and leaf plots, scatter plots, estimation of best fit line, etc.).
2.
Summarize and analyze a set of data (e.g., compute the mean, median, mode,
variance, standard deviation, correlation coefficients, etc.).
3.
Construct frequency distributions for a given set of data and determine the mean,
standard deviation, variance, and expected value for these probability distributions.
4.
Know and apply probability theory (e.g., counting techniques, probability laws,
conditional probability, independent events, etc.) to determine probabilities based on
sample data.
5.
Know and apply probability and statistics principles and theorems (e.g., Central Limit
Theorem, Chebyshev’s Theorem, Empirical Rule, etc.).
6.
Know and apply sampling techniques used to generate sampling distributions.
7.
Determine probabilities (with respect to random variables) associated with sampling
distributions.
8.
For various probability distributions, address questions about a population parameter
(based on sample data) by using the decision-making process of hypothesis testing.
9.
Estimate the value of a population parameter by generating confidence intervals
based on sample data.
10
Know and apply concepts and techniques for conditions not previously addressed
(e.g., establish and test hypotheses comparing population means or variances, analyze the
relationship between two variables to determine if there is a correlation between them,
analyze data which does not satisfy parametric assumption, etc.).
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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Course/lab outline:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Introduction
Descriptive Statistics
Probability
Inference
Chapter 1
Chapters 2-3
Chapters 4-6
Chapters 7-11
Methods of Instruction and Evaluation: The course will be taught using a combination of
lecture, discussion, and group activities with strong use of graphing calculators and student
inquiry. All activities have the purpose of guiding the student to understand statistics and
apply that understanding to real-life situations. MyMathLab will be used and students will be
expected to work with data from a variety of internet sources.
Lecture/Discussion Daily participation in the class dialog is expected.
Homework
Problems are chosen to give adequate practice with important concepts.
Homework is to be completed and submitted online using MyMathLab.
Group projects are completed in class and cannot be made up due to absences. They are
designed to give students experience with problem solving and communication in a group
setting. Individual grades are given.
Written Reaction 3-paragraph written response to current articles that use statistics in some
meaningful way
Tests 4 tests will assess the problem solving aptitude that applies to course content.
Student will earn points for successful completion of:
a)
11 homework assignments (online) @20
b)
7 Group project (in class) @ 20
b)
1 Written Reaction @ 40
c)
4 Tests @ 100
d)
1 Final Exam @ 200
=
=
=
=
=
220
140
40
400
200
The total number of points will be approximately 1000. The grading scale is:
A = 89.5 +
895 – 1000 points
B = 79.5 – 89.4
795 – 894 points
C = 69.5 – 79.4
695 – 794 points
D = 59.5 – 69.4
595 – 694 points
F = 0 – 59.4
0 – 594 points
Tests and Quizzes
All tests will be administered on the date prescribed in this syllabus. The tests will cover
specific material from lecture, problem sets, group work, computer work, and text reading.
In the event that you must be absent from a test, advance notice to the instructor is
MANDATORY. If you do not notify the instructor IN ADVANCE when you will be absent from a
test or quiz, make-up privilege will NOT be extended and your grade will be ZERO!!!
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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Final Exam
The final exam is comprehensive. It is NOT customary for students to take the final exam in
this class earlier than the college schedule. If you must re-schedule your final exam,
ADVANCE approval is MANDATORY.
***IF YOU EXPECT THE INSTRUCTOR TO MAKE ANY EXCEPTIONS TO THESE GRADING POLICIES,
PLEASE BE PREPARED TO PROVIDE LEGAL DOCUMENTATION WITH YOUR REQUEST.
Written Reactions
Written Reaction is due on July 6.
Late papers will receive half credit.
Please include a copy of a current article that interests you and uses statistics.
Paragraph 1: Summarize the main idea and purpose of the article, including the
target audience.
Paragraph 2: Explain how statistics is used by the author to communicate or
persuade.
Paragraph 3: Your personal reaction: Defend your opinion, explain what you
learned from the article, state your lingering questions, suggest flaws or
improvements, etc.
Suggested on-line periodicals:
USA Today
www.usatoday.com
Online surveys
Chicago Tribune www.chicagotribune.com
Gallup Poll
http://www.gallup.com/
LA Times
Roper Center
www.ropercenter.uconn.edu
www.latimes.com
Scientific American
www.sciam.com
Harris Interactive www.harrisinteractive.com/
Psychology Today www.psychologytoday.com
Participation (or Attendance)
Students are expected to attend all classes and participate meaningfully in the activities
each class day.
Incompletes
Please consult the HCC Student Handbook for Incomplete procedures.
Required Writing and Reading:
Required writings will be part of most assignments and tests as students explain how they found the solution, describe
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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their solution graphically, and interpret their answer in context of the problem. Students are expected to read the
material in the textbook for each section studied.
Student Conduct
Students are expected to conduct themselves in a courteous and responsible manner at all times. Please do not
bring food/drink into the classroom. Turn off cell phones during class. Do not talk to others while the instructor is
talking to the class. Consult the Student Handbook for clarification.
Academic Integrity
Academic integrity is a fundamental principle of collegial life at Heartland Community College and is essential to
the credibility of the College=s educational programs. Moreover, because grading may be competitive, students
who misrepresent their academic work violate the right of their fellow students. The College, therefore, views any
act of academic dishonest as a serious offense requiring disciplinary measures, including course failure, suspension,
and even expulsion from the College. In addition, an act of academic dishonesty may have unforeseen effects far
beyond any officially imposed penalties.
Violations of academic integrity include, but are not limited to cheating, aiding or suborning cheating or other acts
of academic dishonesty, plagiarism, misrepresentation of data, falsification of academic records or documents and
unauthorized access to computerized academic or administrative records or systems. Definitions of these violations
may be found in the college catalog.
Plagiarism
Plagiarism is the presenting of others’ ideas as if they were your own. When you write a paper, create a project, do a
presentation or create anything original, it is assumed that all the work, except for that which is attributed to another
author or creator, is your own. Plagiarism is considered a serious academic offense and may take the following
forms:
39902. Copying word-for-word from another source and not giving that source credit.
39903. Paraphrasing the work of another and not giving that source credit.
39904. Adopting a particularly apt phrase as your own
39905. Using an image or a copy of an image without crediting its source
39906. Paraphrasing someone else=s line of thinking in the development of a topic as if it were your own.
39907. Receiving excessive help from a friend or elsewhere, or using another project as if it were your own.
Note that word-for-word copying is not the only form of plagiarism. The penalties for plagiarism may be severe,
ranging from failure on the particular piece of work, failure in the course or expulsion from school in extreme cases.
[Adapted from the Modern Language Association’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. New York: MLA,
1995: 26]
Notice of Canceled Class Sessions:
Cancelled class sessions, for all HCC classes, will be listed under Cancelled Class Meetings in the A-Z Index and under
Academic
Information
in
the
Current
Students
page
on
the
HCC
Web
site.
Go
to http://www.heartland.edu/classCancellations/ to learn what classes have been cancelled for that day and the
upcoming week. Be sure to check the last column, which might contain a message from the instructor.
Syllabi disclaimer
Information in this document is believed to be valid at the time of duplication. Changes will be distributed IN
WRITTEN FORM during regularly scheduled class.
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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Math 141-02 Summer 2010
**Test/Quiz Dates are not subject to change**
WEEK
MONDAY
1
2
June 7
Chapter 2
GROUP—Graphs
HW 1 DUE
TUESDAY
June 1
Chapter 1
Intro and Survey
June 8
Chapter 3
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
June 2
Chapter 1
3
Chapter 2
June 9
Chapter 3
GROUP – Center
and Spread
HW 2 DUE
June 16
Chapter 4
June 10
Chapter 3
June 14
Test:
Chapters 1-3
HW 3 DUE
June 15
Chapter 4
June 22
Chapter 5
4
June 21
Chapter 5
HW 4 DUE
June 23
Chapter 6
HW 5 DUE
June 29
Chapter 7
June 30
Chapter 7
5
June 28
Test:
Chapters 4-6
HW 6 DUE
6
July 5
HOLIDAY—Class
does not meet
July 6
Chapter 8
Written Reaction
DUE
July 7
Chapter 9
HW 8 DUE
July 8
Chapter 9
GROUP—Matched
Pairs
July 12
Test:
Chapters 6-9
HW 9 DUE
July 13
Chapter 10
July 14
Chapter 10
July 19
Chapter 11
July 20
Test:
Chapters 10-11
HW 11 DUE
July 21
Practice Analysis
July 15
Chapter 11
GROUP—Linear
Regression
HW 10 DUE
July 22
Content Review
3
7
8
9
June 17
Chapter 4 –
GROUP -Simulation
June 24
Chapter 6
GROUP –
Sampling
Distributions
July 1
GROUP—
Confidence
Intervals
Chapter 8
HW 7 DUE
July 26
FINAL EXAM
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Summer 2010
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STUDENT INFORMATION
Math 141, Summer 2010
Supply only the information you want the instructor to know!
The instructor does not share any identifying information with others.
Name
___________________________________________________
Address
___________________________________________________
Phone
____________________
Email
___________________________________________________
________________________
How many credit hours are you attempting this semester?
________
Place of employment ________________________________________
Hours/week employed
__________
Math Courses Taken (When? Where?)
What calculator will you be using this semester?
_________________
Anything else you want the instructor to know?
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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Class Data Collection – It is not necessary to put your name on this paper!
If you wish to decline to answer, please write NA.
Estimate average values based on your typical day/week.
1.Gender (M/F)
2.Height in inches
3.Eye color
4.What is the total amount of all coins in your possession at this
moment?
5.How many keys do you have in your possession?
6.Do you smoke cigarettes? (Yes/No)
7.What is the distance (in miles) between your current residence
and this class?
8.How many minutes a day do you spend browsing the Internet?
9.Record your pulse rate (number of heart beats per minute.)
10.How many minutes a day do you spend watching TV?
11.How many hours a week do you participate in sports or have
other physical exercise?
12.How many times a week do you read a daily newspaper?
13.How many minutes does it take to travel from your home to the
HCC campus?
14.Can you tell the difference between Pepsi and Coke?
15.Do you consider yourself a vegetarian? (Yes/No)
16.Are you Left-handed? (Yes/No)
17.How many credit hours do you intend to earn this year (2010)?
18.How many times each month do you shop in a grocery store?
19.How many students were in your high school graduating class?
20.How many credit/debit cards do you use?
Gillespie
Summer 2010
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