Rules/Classroom Management Presentation

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Jeff Arnold
12/10/2008
Acknowledgement: Dr. Dennis Scheitinger
Notes
Rules /Classroom Management Presentation
Please;
1) Turn cell phones off or to vibrate.
2) Use professional language. (Do not use profanity)
3) Only one person talks at a time.
Objectives:
• Compare and contrast a classroom rule with a lesson (behavioral) objective.
• Relate rules to the students’ need for attention and power.
• Relate our set of rules to virtues, values, expectations, procedures, behaviors and consequences using The
Authority for Creating Rules Matrix.
• Use the Rules Rubric to score three (3) of benchmarked sets of rules.
• Provide feedback on the Rules Rubric’s reliability and validity.
• Use the Rules Rubric to score your classroom rules.
Going further…
• Use the Rules Rubric to score your school rules.
• Refine/develop your own classroom rules, procedures, and consequences handbook
• Promote coherence among classroom and school norms by coordinating with teachers at your grade level
/school.
To be enforced rules need to be observed and measured – rules are behavioral objectives. Rules lay the
foundation for classroom procedures. Classroom rules and procedures promote norms.
Norms:
Time. Are you going to start on time? If not how long will you wait for others? If you are going to start on
time, what about latecomers?
Products. Are participants expected to complete something? What are the expected products? What is the role
of each person in the production.
Roles. What are the roles of all of the participants and facilitators? Are all people clear on their roles?
Respect for others. How will respect for others be manifested? What does it mean in the workshop context to
show disrespect? How will the group avoid disrespect?
Participation. Who is expected to participate and how will they demonstrate participation? What role will the
facilitator play in providing equal opportunities to participate?
Examples of norms of participation for adult learning settings include;
• Self-monitor if you tend to talk too much.
-Allow others a chance to express themselves by not “taking the floor” too much.
• Listen with an open mind and heart.
• Engage in dialogue with others, don’t just tell what you know.
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Daemen College TLQP Project
Define Discipline:
Describe the behaviors you see in your classroom:
__________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________,
__________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________,
__________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________, __________
As you share the behaviors the instructor will categorize behaviors as either E’s or I’s
(Try to determine what E and I stand for – please do not yell out until the end of the exercise)
I
E
I and E are the first letter of what words – that go into the column headings?
The goal is to help students move from an extern to an internal locus of control. Rules and procedures have
been shown to be very effective in addressing attention-seeking behavior. In most classrooms I have observed
about 90% of the student problem behavior is aimed at seeking attention. Questioning students is generally
more effective than yelling.
“Where should you be?” (instead of: “Get to class!”)
“What should you be doing?” (instead of: “Get to work!”)
“What will you do next time?” (instead of: “Never do that again!”)
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J. Arnold
Why we need to have good Rules: Teacher Response to Behavior
Behavior
Feelings
Action/Impulse*
Attention
Irritation
Annoyance
Verbal
Power
Anger
Frustration
Fear
Physical
Revenge
Anger
Frustration
Dislike
Hurt
Devastation
Flight
Fight
Professional Concern
Prescriptive or resigned to
failure
Avoidance
Fear of Failure
* Between stimulus and response is choice – your choice depends on your level of conscientiousness
Ground Rules
The responsibility you have as an educator is immense, your actions can have far reaching implications.
Relationships with students need to be based on consistent and firm expectations, and contribute to your
students becoming respectful, honest, and productive members of society.
An essential step in establishing positive relationship is setting clear expectations. Classroom rules and norms
communicate expectations for the learning environment. By establishing rules and norms in the beginning of a
course a lot of misunderstandings can be avoided. Rules and norms can vary depending on the type and level
of the course. In some cases you may find it useful to post rules on the wall.
Setting clear classroom rules and consequences aid students in gaining an understanding of the set of values
that norms are built upon. Character Education is based on the idea, that once students understand how a set of
concrete rules, relate to a set of abstract values, students can internalize norms. It is possible that the set of
values you have in the school are not the same as in a student’s home. At home, it maybe OK (and even
expected) to hit someone back. At schools we seek justice – but fairness is based a set of consequences
(values) that do not relay on physical force. Well it is true that we do not want to impose political and religious
values on students in our public schools, we need to teach and promote social values.
Title: The Authority for Creating Rules Matrix (draft)
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J. Arnold
Virtue
(Abstract)
Value
(Abstract)
Justice*
Wrong none,
by doing
injuries or
omitting the
benefits that
are your duty
Fairness**
You are
important
-Who you are
-What you
believe
-What you
say (feel)
-What you do
Others are
important
-Who they are
-What they
believe
-What they
say (feel)
-What they do
Humility*
Being humble*,
is being
unpretentious
and modest,
someone who
does not think
that he or she is
better or more
important than
others.
Sometimes by
giving up power
you can gain new
understandings.
Modesty** /
Pride**
Good leaders
follow rules.
It is O.K. to
ask for help.
Rule
(Concrete)
Only one person
talks at a time.
(silence*)
Turn cell phones
off or to vibrate.
Use professional
language.
(sincerity*)
Address
classmates by
first names.
(temperance*)
Return materials
to proper place
when finished.
(order*)
Follow the
directions given
by your
instructor.
Raise your hand
when you have a
question.
Rules help us Ignore outbursts
all work
from other
together.
students
(Moderation*/
Frugality*)
(Tranquility* Be
not disturbed at
trifles, or at
accidents common
or unavoidable)
Norm
(Abstract)
Expectation /
Procedures
(Concrete)
Social skills allow Stay seated until class
us to show respect is dismissed
for each other in
Push in chairs before
many ways.
leaving the class
Treat others the
Put trash in proper
way you would
receptacle
like to be treated.
I will treat you with
respect so you will
know how to treat
me.
Feel free to do
anything that
doesn’t cause a
problem from
anyone else.
Participate by
responding
quickly and
politely to your
instructor’s
requests.
(Roles)
Learn the limits of
your talents,
ability, or
authority; and, do
not reach for that
which is beyond
your grasp. (Role)
Celebrate success
in your self and in
other others.
If you cause a problem I
will ask you to solve it.
If you cannot solve the
problem, or choose not to,
I will do something.
What I do, will depend on
the special person, and the
special situation.
If you fell something is
unfair, whisper to me,
“I’m not sure that is fair”,
and we will talk.
Stay on assigned task
Complete assignments
on time
(Resolution* /
Products)
Come to class prepared:
bring proper materials
to class
Arrive to class on time
(Industry* lose no
time)
In small groups, ask a
classmate for help
before asking the
teacher.
Behavior that
promote norm
(Concrete)
Sharing of
resources
Smiling
Greetings
Handshake
Looking at the
person speaking
Giving and
accepting feedback
Peers and the
instructor provide
feedback to the
students.
(Students,
colleagues, parents,
and the
administration
provide feedback
to the instructor.)
Say “Please” and
“Thank you”.
Virtues*: justice, humility, temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, moderation, cleanliness, tranquility,
chastity - from Franklin's autobiography, compiled by Paul Ford.
Value**: fairness (what I want / what you want), modesty/pride, enjoy responsibly, make your word impeccable or do not speak,
structure/flexibility, determination/stubbornness, extravagant/cheap, product/process, warm/cool feedback, excess/shortage (balance),
sterile/filthy, chaos/sensory deprivation, promiscuous / cloistered – and the golden mean
Norms: time, products, roles, respect, and participation
Rules are at the center of the learning environment – all rules are based on a set of values!!
Classroom rules are objectives and need to be:
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J. Arnold
1) Observable
2) Measurable
3) Positive
4) Statements / Not questions
5) Limited to five or less
6) Related to a set of values that are held by all members of the learning community
Involve your students in developing a discipline by using one or more of these approaches
1) Negotiate (some) rules at the start - the students decide whether these rules become part of the social
contract.
2) The teacher shares his/her values with the student – and the student suggests rules.
3) The students share their values with the teacher – and the teacher suggests rules.
4) Students develop rules for themselves and/or the teacher.
Please review your classroom rules using the Rules Rubric on the next page.
Note: Please note that students need to understand rules (concrete) before based they understand virtues and values
(abstract).
Examples of Students’ Expectations for Instructor
1)
2)
3)
4)
5)
Page 5
Return graded assignments one week after the due date
Explain assignment in detail at least one week before they are due
Start and end class on-time
Provide useful feedback and allow for rebuttal
Post assessment tools on-line
J. Arnold
Procedures Worksheet
1.
2.
Seating Arrangement:
___ Open Seating
15. Materials needed for class:
___ Assigned Seating
Behavior for entering the Class:
___ Visiting with friends allowed
___ Visiting with friends not allowed
___ Place personal belongings in desk, locker or bookshelf
___ Place class materials on desk
___ Copy class work from board
___ Copy homework assignment from board
___ Other: ______________________________________
16. Procedure if you do not have class materials:
3.
Behavior when leaving the class:
___ Leave when the bell is sounded
___ Leave only when dismissed by the teacher
19. Penalty for late work:
4.
Format for heading papers:
___ Model of format: _______________________________
___ Location on paper
20. Grading policy:
17. What to do when you need to leave the class or cannot cope:
18. Class policy for making up work:
21. Testing schedule:
22. Structure of class procedures:
5.
Procedure for turning in completed work:
___ Will be discussed with each assignment
___ At beginning of each class
___ At end of each class
___ Only when requested by teacher
23. Where to put trash:
6.
How to request a drink of water:
25. How to ask for assistance:
7.
Procedure for going to the restroom:
26. When is talking allowed:
8.
Procedure for Going to the clinic/nurse:
27. Procedure for asking questions:
9.
Procedure for going to the office:
28. Procedure for responding to questions:
24. Policy on chewing gum or eating in class:
10. Procedure for sharpening pencils and requesting supplies:
29. Procedure if you are unsure about asking a question in front of
classmates:
11. What to do when tardy to class:
30. Rules for attire – ie, hats:
12. Procedure for going to the locker:
31. Rules for attire – Clothes with slogans/sayings:
13. Policy regarding book covers and jackets:
32. Rules on cigarettes and alcohol:
14. Policy on care of texts:
33. Rules on weapons:
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J. Arnold
Consequences - Effective Implementation
1) Always implement a consequence
2) Select the most appropriate consequence from a pre-established list
a. Include natural consequences
b. Design a set of progressive consequences
i. Warning
ii. Name on board (check marks)
iii. Move seat
iv. Call home
3) State the rule and consequence to the student – you don’t need to say more
4) Use Proximity
5) Make direct eye contact
6) Be private. Use a soft, calm voice. Only the student(s) should hear
7) Do not embarrass the student
8) Be firm, clear, and committed – strength come from a commitment that you are doing the right thing,
not from the use of force
9) Do not think in terms of winning and losing. You and your students are both on the same team.
10) Control anger. Expressing anger shows that you are human, but a chronically angry teacher is not
effective.
11) Do not accept excuses
12) Sometimes it is best to let the student choose the consequence
13) Avoid traps – the conflict cycle; diffuse power struggles.
14) Avoid behaviors that make you a victim / bully or aloof / interrogator
Remember: Communication is better than force
Notes: (Prompt, Progressive, Proportional, Practical – Natural, Not Punishment)
The following is an excellent reference to help you during your student teaching and preparing for your first day as a teacher.
Wong, Harry K, and Wong, Rosemary T., The First Days of School, Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc., Mountain View, CA, 2001
Additional Information: ISBN 0-9629360-2-2 / Library of Congress Catalog CARD number; 97-91202
Phone: (605) 965-7896 / website: www.effectiveteaching.com
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J. Arnold
Title: Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Attribute
Level 4
Level 3
Level 2
Level 1
Rules are
measurable and
observable
(Weight: 0.5)
Score
Three (3) – Five
(5) positively
stated rules are
included.
And
A student’s
behavior can be
easily observed
and recorded for
each of the rules
More than five
rules are
included.
OR
One rule may not
be positively
stated.
OR
A student’s
behavior can be
easily observed
and recorded for
all but one of the
rules.
Rules include a
compliance rule,
a talking rule, and
an in class
behavior rule.
Rules apply to all
students most of
the time. Rules
respect personal
freedom of each
student.
OR
A student can
quickly comply
with all but one
rule by modifying
behavior in class.
Only two positive
rules are included.
OR
A student’s
behavior can be
easily observed
and recorded for
all but two of the
rules.
Only one positive
rule is included.
OR
Three or more
rules are based on
value statements
that cannot be
easily observed
nor measured.
Rules do not
address a full
range of
management
issues in a typical
classroom.
OR
One rule requires
students to
unnecessarily
forfeit key
freedoms.
OR
Two rules deal
with expectations
that are better
communicated as
procedures.
Rules are
narrowly focused
and provide a
rigid structure and
require students to
unnecessarily
forfeit key
freedoms.
OR
Three or more
rules deal with
expectations that
could be better
communicated as
procedures.
At least two rules
have a relevant
icon.
OR
One rule may not
be clear.
OR
There are one or
two errors in
grammar, syntax,
capitalization, or
spelling but they
do not interfere
with readability.
At least one rule
has a relevant
icon.
OR
Two rules may
not be clear.
OR
There are one or
two errors in
grammar, syntax,
capitalization, or
spelling that
interfere with
readability.
No relevant icons
are used.
OR
The writing
demonstrates a
lack of control of
the conventions of
written English.
OR
There are three or
more errors in
grammar, syntax,
capitalization, or
spelling that
interfere with
readability.
Reviewer: ______
Instructor: ______
(Out of 2 points)
Rules are relevant
and realistic for
classroom use
(Weight: 0.5)
Score
Reviewer: ______
Instructor: ______
(Out of 2 points)
Icons /
Writing
Mechanics /
(Weight: 0.5)
Score
Reviewer: ______
Instructor: ______
(Out of 2 points)
Page 8
Rules include a
compliance rule,
a talking rule, and
an in class
behavior rule. All
rules are
positively stated
and apply to all
students at all
times.
All rules are
written to respect
personal freedom
of each student. A
student can
quickly comply
with any rule by
modifying
behavior in class.
Each rule has a
relevant icon to
help students to
remember the
rule.
And
Each rule is clear
and logical.
And
There are no
errors in spelling
grammar, syntax,
or capitalization
that interfere with
readability.
J. Arnold
Benchmarked Papers: Based on the Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Distinguished: Benchmarked Paper
Rules for a Grade 4 classroom
Please,
1. Follow directions given by the teacher immediately.
2. Share classroom resources by taking turns. *
3. Work safely on assigned tasks.
4. Put all materials back in their proper place.
5. Please keep hands, feet and objects to yourself.
* Five different procedures are used to help students understand when talking is appropriate in five different
situations; 1) large group instruction, 2) small group instruction, 3) independent work, 4) recess, and 5)
walking in the halls.
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J. Arnold
Distinguished: Benchmarked Paper:
Scored using the, Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Benchmark Score:
Level Score: ________4________ , _____4_________ , _____4_______
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic) (writing mechanics)
Point Score: ______2_______ + ______2_______ + _____2_______ =
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic)
6 /6
(writing mechanics)
Comments:
Measurable and Observable:
Warm: All five rules are measurable and observable.
Relevant and Realistic:
The rules do not specifically address when it is appropriate to talk, however the rule regarding sharing
classroom resources is general enough to cover the idea that one person talks at a time. If students understand
the procedures for talking in different situations then a specific rule for talking may not be needed. The
annotation makes it clear that the teacher has developed a plan to communicate the expectations about when it
is appropriate to talk.
Writing Mechanics:
Rules are clear and logical and are grammatically correct, and relevant icons are used.
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J. Arnold
Proficient: Benchmarked Paper:
Scored using the, Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Rules for a Grade 4 classroom
1. Please raise your hand for permission to speak.
2. Follow directions the first time they are given.
3. Ask permission to leave the classroom.
4. Walk in the classroom and in the halls.
5. Always do your best work!
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J. Arnold
Proficient : Benchmarked Paper:
Scored using the, Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Level Score: ________3________ , ______3________ , _______3______
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic) (writing mechanics)
Point Score: ______1.5______ + _______1.5_____ + ______1.5______ = 4.5 /6
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Comments:
Measurable and Observable:
The rule 5, Always do you best work!, is not measurable or observable. Always doing your best work, is a great
expectation, but it is not a rule that can be enforced.
Relevant and Realistic:
An additional rule about in class behavior, such as keeping hand and feet to yourself would make your rules
relevant to a fourth grade classroom.
Writing Mechanics:
The rule 5, “Always do your best work!”, doesn’t have an icon.
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J. Arnold
Developing: Benchmarked Paper:
Scored using the, Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
1. Bring all materials to class.
2. Hand-in assignments on time.
3. Raise hand before you speak.
4. While someone is talking, please do not talk.
5. You may only use the bathroom or the drinking fountain during lunchtime.
6. Arrive to class on time.
7. Respect and be kind to yourself and others
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J. Arnold
Developing: Benchmarked Paper:
Scored using the, Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric
Rules for a Grade 4 classroom
Level Score: ________3________ , ______.5________ , _______3______
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic) (writing mechanics)
Point Score: ______1.5______ + _______.5_____ + ______1.5______ = 3.5 /6
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Comments:
Measurable and Observable:
Neither “Bring all materials to class”, nor “Respect and be kind to yourself and others” are measurable and
observable – Do the required materials change from day to day? How does a student know what materials to
bring to class? Seven rules are stated.
Relevant and Realistic:
The rules are narrowly focused, for example the rules do not address the need to keep hands and feet to
yourself.
The following rules deal with expectations that are better communicated as procedures; “Bring all materials
to class.”, “ Hand-in assignments on time.”, “Arrive to class on time.” In addition, students may not be able to
quickly comply to these three rules.
Rule 5, “ You may only use the bathroom or the drinking fountain during lunchtime.”, requires the students to
unnecessarily forfeit key freedoms.
Writing Mechanics:
An icon is not included for Rule 7, “Respect and be kind to yourself and others.”
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J. Arnold
Guided Practice 1: Whole Group:
Please score the following classroom Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric. Grade 4: Classroom
Rules
1) Listen and follow directions
2) Do your best work
3) Raise hand for permission to speak, unless called upon by teacher
4) Keep hands, feet and objects to self at all times
5) Use appropriate language
6) Do your work neatly
7) Be kind and helpful to others
Level Score: _________________ , _______________ , ______________
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Point Score: _______________ + _______________ + ______________ = ___ / 6
(measurable and observable)
(relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Comments:
Measurable and Observable:
Relevant and Realistic:
Writing Mechanics:
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J. Arnold
Four Agreements:
Be impeccable with your word, Don’t take anything personally, Don’t make assumptions, and Always do your best
Interesting Rules:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Attend and participate in class.
Be on time and ready at the scheduled start of class.
Sit in your assigned seat and raise your hand if you wish to speak.
Wait until you are called on before you speak.
Come prepared to class.
Remain in your assigned seats until you are dismissed or otherwise instructed.
You should always bring your notebook and something to write with.
Do not bring food, candy, gum or drinks to class.
There is no eating in class.
If you leave class (bathroom, office, band lesson etc.) be prepared to stay after school to make-up work.
Complete all assigned work to the best of your ability.
Mature behavior is expected.
Be patient and tolerant of yourself and others.
Keep hands, and words to yourself
Always keep your feet on the floor
Always sit in assigned seat
All classroom furniture will remain free of garbage and damage
Unless given permission otherwise, you can only talk about your assigned work
Be responsible.
Be a good citizen.
 Pay attention.
 Be ready to learn.
 Demonstrate respect for others.
 Respect others’ rights.
 Respect authority.
 Treat school property appropriately
 Do your best.
 Take care of your materials.
 Maintain appropriate behavior in the classroom.
 Be Safe
 Be a team member
 Be kind to others.
- Be polite.
- Aim high


Be: Positive, Punctual, Polite, Prompt, Proactive, Properly dressed, and Prepared
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J. Arnold
KEY Do Not Copy
Guided Practice 1: Whole Group:
Please score the following classroom Abbreviated Classroom Rules Scoring Rubric. Grade 4: Classroom
Rules
1) Listen and follow directions
2) Do your best work
3) Raise hand for permission to speak, unless called upon by teacher
4) Keep hands, feet and objects to self at all times
5) Use appropriate language
6) Do your work neatly
7) Be kind and helpful to others
Level Score: ________2________ , _______4_______ , _______1______
(measurable and observable) (relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Point Score: _______1_______ + _______2______ + ______.5_____ = 3.0-3.5 / 6
(measurable and observable)
(relevant and realistic)
(writing mechanics)
Comments:
Measurable and Observable:
Rules; 2) Do your best work, 6) Do your work neatly, and 7) Be kind and helpful to others all are
expectations—are based on value statements- Use appropriate language may need some more explainationRule 2 and 6 seem to overlap so I did not take off twice.
Relevant and Realistic:
No problems –Full credit
Writing Mechanics:
No icons- Level 1
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J. Arnold
Virtues according to Benjamin Franklin
These are the virtues that Benjamin Franklin used to develop what he called 'moral perfection'. He had a
checklist in a notebook to measure each day how he lived up to his virtues.
They became known through Benjamin Franklin's autobiography and inspired many people all around the
world. Authors and speakers in the self-help movement report being influenced by him, for example Anthony
Robbins who based a part of his 'Date with Destiny' seminar on Franklin's concept.
1. Temperance. Eat not to Dullness Drink not to Elevation.
2. Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself. Avoid trifling Conversation.
3. Order. Let all your Things have their Places. Let each Part of your Business have its Time.
4. Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought. Perform without fail what you resolve.
5. Frugality. Make no Expense but to do good to others or yourself: i.e. Waste nothing.
6. Industry. Lose no Time. Be always employ'd in something useful. Cut off all unnecessary Actions.
7. Sincerity. Use no hurtful Deceit. Think innocently and justly; and, if you speak, speak accordingly.
8. Justice. Wrong none, by doing injuries or omitting the benefits that are your duty.
9. Moderation. Avoid Extremes. Forbear resenting Injuries so much as you think they deserve.
10. Cleanliness. Tolerate no Uncleanness in Body, Clothes or Habitation.
11. Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at Trifles, or at Accidents common or unavoidable.
12. Chastity. Rarely use Venery but for Health or Offspring; Never to Dullness, Weakness, or the Injury of
your own or another's Peace or Reputation.
13. Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates.
Source: Franklin's 13 Virtues Extract of Franklin's autobiography, compiled by Paul Ford.
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J. Arnold
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