FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY ENGLISH III TEACHER GABRIELA

advertisement

FRANCISCAN UNIVERSITY

ENGLISH III

TEACHER GABRIELA

ENGLISH PAST TENSE PRONUNCIATION

Grammar:

Simple Past Statements – Regular Verbs

I) FORM

The simple past verb form does not change for different subjects. The negative in the simple past is formed with the auxiliary did + not (which is usually contracted to didn’t) and the base form of the verb.

Affirmative statements

Subject + (verb) ed

I rented a video.

He played video games.

Negative statements

Subject + didn’t + base form of the verb

She didn’t study French.

They didn’t e-mail their friends.

II) USE

The simple past is used for single or habitual actions completed at a definite time in the past. It can also be used to talk about states and feelings in the past (e.g., I didn’t want to go out last night. I didn’t like the movie.). It is often used with a past time expression (e.g., yesterday, last week).

III) SPELLING RULES:

– ED ENDINGS

Spelling rules for adding –ed to verbs to form the simple past: a) For most verbs: add

–ed to the base form of the verb (play – played, watch

– watched). b) When the verb ends in e: add –d (like – liked). c) When the verb ends in a consonant and y: change the y to I and add –ed

(study – studied). d) When the verb ends in a vowel and a consonant: double the consonant and add –ed (chat – chatted).

Exception: When the verb is not stressed on the final syllable, do not double the final consonant: visit – visited.

IV) SPEAKING NATURALLY:

-ED ENDINGS

For English past tense pronunciation of regular verbs, the "-ed" ending has the following three distinct pronunciations: /id/, /t/, /d/

a) Teaching English Past Tense Pronunciation— /id/ Endings

Deciding when to use the /id/ pronunciation is pretty simple. This Past Tense ending is only used for verbs ending with a /t/ or /d/ sound. This is the only ending that is pronounced with an additional syllable.

Examples of /id/ Endings for Past Tense Verbs

"want" becomes "wanted" and is pronounced "want/id/" (two syllables)

"need" becomes "needed" and is pronounced "need/id/" (two syllables)

"decide" becomes "decided" and is pronounced "decide/id/" (three syllables)

"dedicate" becomes "dedicated" and is pronounced "dedicate/id/" (four syllables)

b) Teaching English Past Tense Pronunciation— /t/ and /d/ Endings

 The "-ed" ending of unvoiced sounds takes on a /t/.

Voiceless or unvoiced sounds: / p / - / f / - / θ / - / k / - / s / - /  / - / ʧ

/

Examples of /t/ Endings for Past Tense Verbs

"laugh" becomes "laughed" and is pronounced "laugh/t/" (one syllable)

"walk" becomes "walked" and is pronounced "walk/t/" (one syllable)

"kiss" becomes "kissed" and is pronounced "kiss/t/" (one syllable)

"finish" becomes "finished" and is pronounced "finish/t/" (two syllables)

 The "-ed" ending of voiced sounds take on a /d/.

Voiced sounds: / b /-/ v /-/ ð / - / g / - / z / - / ʒ /- / ʤ

/- / m / - / n / - / ð /-

/ l / - / r / - /  /

Examples of /d/ Endings for Past Tense Verbs

"clean" becomes "cleaned" and is pronounced "clean/d/" (one syllable)

"dream" becomes "dreamed" and is pronounced "dream/d/" (one syllable

"save" becomes "saved" and is pronounced "save/d/" (one syllable)

"enjoy" becomes "enjoyed" and is pronounced "enjoy/d/" (two syllables)

"marry" becomes "married" and is pronounced "marry/d/" (two syllables)

Download