AC History planning tem

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Settlement Odd Years Sem 1.
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Lesson Sequence instructions
For each lesson
 Delete/adapt skills or lesson components not applicable
Select and paste in just one outcome/elaboration to focus on, from VELS and Australian Curriculum
 Insert resources and where they are located
 Insert what students do/what teacher does
 Insert special needs
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Learning Focus, Content descriptors & elaborations & Standards instructions +PoLT
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Formatting
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INSERT NAME OF SCHOOL
INSERT NAME OF UNIT Odd/Even/All Years – year level
This unit combines compatible content and skills from the Australian History Curriculum and the three Priorities with the
Victorian Essential Learning Standards for Humanities AND relevant interdisciplinary learning from VELS Personal Learning,
Interdisciplinary Learning, Thinking Processes. Some aspects of VELS and Australian English curriculum are also included.
This unit was developed by (insert names of contributing teachers and date.)
Contents
LESSON SEQUENCES .............................................................................................................................. 4
Lesson 1 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Page 1 of 34
Lesson 2 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Lesson 3 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Lesson 4 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 4
Lesson 5 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Lesson 6 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Lesson 7 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Lesson 8 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 5
Lesson 9 ...................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Lesson 10 .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Lesson 11 .................................................................................................................................................................................................... 7
Key Understandings for Assessment ........................................................................................................ 8
Focus Questions .......................................................................................................................................... 8
LEARNING FOCUS ........................................................................................................................................................................................... 9
VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS LEARNING FOCUS ........................................ 9
VELS Learning Focus Humanities Level 3 ........................................................................................................................................... 9
VELS Learning Focus English Level 3 .................................................................................................................................................. 9
VELS Learning Focus Thinking Processes Level 3 ............................................................................................................................ 11
VELS Learning Focus Personal Learning Level 3 .............................................................................................................................. 11
VELS Learning Focus Interpersonal Learning Level 3....................................................................................................................... 11
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM HISTORY LEVEL DESCRIPTION: Years 3 & 4 .............................. 12
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS – HISTORY: Years 3 & 4
13
Historical Knowledge and Understanding ............................................................................................................................................ 13
Historical Skills .......................................................................................................................................................................................... 15
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH LEVEL DESCRIPTION Years 3 & 4 ............................... 17
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS – ENGLISH: Years 3 & 4
18
READING AND VIEWING ...................................................................................................................................................................... 18
WRITING ................................................................................................................................................................................................... 21
SPEAKING AND LISTENING ................................................................................................................................................................ 25
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM PRIORITIES .......................................................................................... 28
Page 2 of 34
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures .............................................................................................................. 28
Asia and Australia’s Engagement with Asia ......................................................................................................................................... 28
Sustainability ............................................................................................................................................................................................. 28
ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS ...................................................................................................................................................................... 30
VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS (VELS) ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS ..... 30
VELS Humanities Standards Years 3 & 4 ............................................................................................................................................ 30
VELS English Standards Years 3 & 4 ................................................................................................................................................... 31
VELS Thinking Processes Standards Years 3 & 4 ............................................................................................................................. 31
VELS Personal Learning Standards Years 3 & 4 ............................................................................................................................... 31
VELS Interpersonal Learning Standards Years 3 & 4 ........................................................................................................................ 32
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS – HISTORY .................................... 32
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM HISTORY Years 3 & 4 ....................................................................................................................... 32
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS – ENGLISH .................................... 33
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH Years 3 & 4 ....................................................................................................................... 33
PoLT (Principles of Learning and Teaching).......................................................................................... 34
PoLT focus to be embedded in this unit. .............................................................................................................................................. 34
Page 3 of 34
VELS
standard/s
Level 1
Special
needs
Resources
Activities
LESSON SEQUENCES
Lesson 1
Cue in by talking about
Read
Explain
Students listen and contribute
to discussion about...
Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.
Model task
Table task: make/build/test/etc
Use thinking tool....
Share Time:
Insert specific texts & where
kept
Selected easy-reading nonfiction texts about



At risk
ESL
Gifted
Select from below
Australian
curriculum
standard/s
Years 1 & 2
Select from below
Page 4 of 34
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Lesson 2
Lesson 3
Lesson 4
Australian
VELS
curriculum
standard/s
standard/s
Level 2
Years 1 & 2
Special
needs
Resources
Activities
E5
Lesson 1
Lesson 5
Cue in by talking about
Read
Explain
Students listen and contribute to
discussion about...
Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.
Model task
Table task: make/build/test/etc
Use thinking tool....
Share Time:
Insert specific texts & where kept
Selected easy-reading non-fiction
texts about



At risk
ESL
Gifted
Select from below
Page 5 of 34
Lesson 6
Lesson 7
Lesson 8
E5
Lesson 5
Page 6 of 34
Lesson 6
Lesson 7
Lesson 8
Activities
Resources
Special
needs



At risk
ESL
Gifted
Select from below
Select from below
E5
VELS
Australian curriculum
standards
standards years 1 & 2
Level 2
Lesson 9
Cue in by talking about
Read
Explain
Students listen and contribute to
discussion about...
Review e.g. taking turns &
sharing.
Model task
Table task: make/build/test/etc
Use thinking tool....
Share Time:
Insert specific texts & where kept
Selected easy-reading non-fiction
texts about
Page 7 of 34
Lesson 10
Lesson 11
Key Understandings for Assessment
Page 8 of 34
Focus Questions
LEARNING FOCUS
VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS LEARNING FOCUS
VELS
Learning
Focus
Humanities
Level 3
VELS
Learning
Focus
English
Level 3
Page 9 of 34
As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in the Humanities, they apply the concepts of time, continuity and
change through a study of the history and traditions of Australians. They examine stories, artefacts and other evidence from the past and
present to learn about Australian society and its origins, such as the history of national symbols, including the flag, and key
commemorations and celebrations such as Anzac Day and Labour Day. They examine the histories of the cultural groups represented in
their classroom, community and nation. They learn to sequence some key events on a timeline and write simple explanations of events.
Students investigate the human and physical characteristics of their local area and other parts of Victoria and consider features of their
local community that have changed over time. They learn about settlement patterns, major land uses, communication networks, and the
location and variety of national parks in Victoria. They begin to make some simple comparisons between local and other Victorian
environments: natural features, climate, land use and types of human activities. Students develop awareness and understanding of the
effects of people's interactions with their environment and the ways in which these affect their lives. Students begin to visualise and
describe location and direction using simple alphanumeric grids and compass points. They learn to use atlas maps and a globe to locate
and name the states and territories of Australia.
Students learn to distinguish between basic needs and wants (for example, food, clothing, shelter, and affection), saving and spending,
buyers (consumers) and sellers (producers), and goods and services. They develop an understanding of the role of money and identify
ways to save; for example, using a savings account, and begin to understand the importance of budgeting. They examine and compare
different types of work and specific jobs.
As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in English, they speak, listen, read and write with some critical
awareness, using a growing variety of text types and show some appreciation of the role of formal discourses in English.
Students read an increasing range of texts including imaginative texts such as chapter books, junior novels and poems, as well as
informative texts, in print and electronic form. Texts typically have varied sentence patterns, written language structures and some
specialised topic-related or literary vocabulary, and ideas and information extending beyond students’ immediate experience. Students
use a range of strategies to interpret the main ideas and purpose of texts – for example, interpreting figurative language or linking
information from headings – and explore characters’ qualities, motives and actions. Through discussion, students develop their
understanding of why interpretations of a text may vary, and how the choice of subject matter is influenced by context, the author’s
purpose, and the intended audience. They read more critically and learn about the use of some simple symbolic meanings and
stereotypes in texts.
Students develop confidence in writing a range of imaginative and informative texts, including simple narratives and descriptions, and
texts that explain, inform and express a point of view. They draw on their knowledge of texts and language and learn to use a variety of
sentences in appropriate grammatical order, using suitable vocabulary for the subject matter including nouns, verbs, adjectives and
adverbs, and punctuating appropriately to support meaning including exclamation marks and quotation marks. They learn to spell most
one- and two-syllable words with regular spelling patterns (for example, growing, found, might), frequently used words which have less
regular spelling patterns (for example, because, there, friends), and some other words of more than one syllable (for example,
yesterday, afternoon, money). They make plausible attempts at spelling new and more difficult words. They experiment with combining
verbal and visual elements to enhance the texts they produce.
Students develop strategies for writing to assist in planning and organising ideas prior to writing, and adapt their writing to suit their
audience and purpose. They learn to use a range of resources, including information and communications technology, to revise written
work and check spelling.
Students recognise that speaking and listening provide opportunities to exchange information, to share and explore ideas, and to
express opinions and listen to the opinions of others. They participate in discussions, conversations and presentations in small and large
groups, learning to vary their speaking and listening to suit the context, purpose and audience. In spontaneous, planned and rehearsed
situations they learn how to project their voice adequately for an audience and to use appropriate spoken language features such as
sequence and past tense when recounting an event. When speaking, they recognise the need to rephrase statements to clarify meaning
and information.
Students develop skills in listening attentively during class and group discussions, and to factual spoken texts such as audio, film and
invited presentations. They practise identifying the topic, retelling information accurately, asking clarifying questions, volunteering
information and justifying opinions.
Page 10 of 34
VELS
Learning
Focus
Thinking
Processes
Level 3
VELS
Learning
Focus
Personal
Learning
Level 3
VELS
Learning
Focus
Interpersonal
Learning
Level 3
Page 11 of 34
As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in Thinking Processes, they explore aspects of their natural,
constructed and social world, wondering and developing questions about it. They use a range of sources of information including
observations and findings from their own investigations to answer these questions. Students develop strategies for organising and
summarising information and reflecting on their thinking. They begin to categorise knowledge and ideas, identify patterns, and form
generalisations. They learn to make connections between both new and established ideas and their own knowledge.
With thinking tools to assist them, students begin to ask more focused and clarifying questions. They develop skills in collecting and
organising ideas from a range of sources to construct knowledge. They learn to question the validity of sources, communicate and
record their questions, responses and thoughts, and give reasons for conclusions.
Students participate in a variety of investigations and activities involving problem solving that encourage them to experiment with a range
of creative solutions. They begin to reflect on the approaches they use to assist them to form their solutions. They explore ideas
creatively; for example, by engaging with new ideas and other perspectives.
Students give reasons for changes that may occur in their thinking. They begin to recognise that others may have different opinions and
understand that reasoning can be influenced by strong feelings. They begin to question arguments presented to them; for example,
those based on the assertion that ‘everybody knows’ or ‘I just know’.
Students develop language to describe specific thinking processes and, with support, use thinking tools to assist them to complete a
given task. They continue to reflect regularly on their thinking, learning to describe their thinking processes verbally.
As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in Personal Learning, they begin to build on personal strengths by
recognising strategies for learning which help them learn most effectively. With support, they use their past learning to inform their future
learning, and begin to set learning improvement goals.
Students participate in a diverse range of learning activities that allow them to acknowledge their development as learners. They monitor
their learning through strategies such as share time and seeking feedback from the teacher and, where appropriate, their peers.
Students learn to recognise the various positive and negative emotions that may be associated with their learning, and that feelings of
uncertainty do not equate with an inability to complete a task. They explore the implications of impulsive behaviour and identify
strategies they can use to manage impulsiveness, such as taking time to think about their opinions before giving them and considering
alternative viewpoints before making a value judgment about an idea. They develop an awareness of their emotions and the capacity to
use positive self-talk; for example, by compiling a list of strategies they can implement when they are feeling uncertain. Through
reflection on their achievements across a range of tasks, they begin to understand the roles of persistence and effort in completing
tasks. Students reflect on their own behaviour in the classroom and the personal values that inform those behaviours. They develop and
respect protocols, such as codes of cooperation, that promote learning with peers. They begin to compare their own values with those
agreed to by the class.
Students reflect on their contribution to the creation of a positive learning culture in the classroom and recognise that they may learn with
and from peers.
With support, students develop strategies for managing their own learning, and identify the need for resource and time management in
completing short tasks. They begin to use various tools, such as personal diaries and portfolios, to help them reflect on the effectiveness
of the strategies they use in learning and in recording and commenting on task outcomes. They learn to set simple goals for future
learning such as ‘to practise a specific skill’. They begin to review their work to check for accuracy.
As students work towards the achievement of Level 3 standards in Interpersonal Development, they interact with their peers, older and
younger students, and adults in both informal and formal contexts. They develop their skills and strategies for getting to know and
understand others within increasingly complex situations. With teacher support, they identify different types of friendships and
relationships. They discuss the expectations they have of friendship and relationship groups and acknowledge the expectations that
others have of them. They recognise that relationships change and that positive relationships do not depend on always agreeing with
one another.
Students are encouraged to think about their values and how these affect their feelings and behaviour. They are supported to develop
relationships based on respect and the valuing of individual differences; for example, speaking respectfully about others, listening and
responding appropriately and encouraging others’ contributions. They learn to respect other students’ belongings and, when appropriate,
to share their own.
Students begin to explore the link between their feelings and their behaviour. They learn about empathy and use this to begin to respond
to the needs of others. Using prompts and questions, they develop skills in giving and accepting constructive feedback; for example,
praising or making suggestions for improvement.
Students are introduced to a variety of strategies for dealing with conflict and bullying. By articulating the conflict to be resolved, they
discuss options and outcomes and work with others to develop plans and procedures to reduce the possibility of conflict, avoid or
resolve conflict.
In teams, students work towards the achievement of agreed goals within a set timeframe. With teacher assistance, they develop
awareness of their role in the team and responsibilities in various situations, and interact with others accordingly. Students begin to be
aware that different points of view may be valid. Using provided criteria, they reflect on the effectiveness of the teams in which they
participate.
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM HISTORY LEVEL DESCRIPTION: Years 3 & 4
The content provides opportunities to develop historical understanding through key concepts including sources, continuity and change, cause and
effect, perspectives, empathy and significance. These concepts may be investigated within a particular historical context to facilitate an understanding
of the past and to provide a focus for historical inquiries.
The history content at this level involves two strands: Historical Knowledge and Understanding and Historical Skills. These strands are interrelated and
should be taught in an integrated way; they may be integrated across learning areas and in ways that are appropriate to specific local contexts. The order
and detail in which they are taught are programming decisions.
Australian Curriculum History Level Description Year 3
Australian Curriculum History Level Description Year 4
First Contacts
Community and Remembrance
The Level 3 curriculum provides a study of identity and diversity in both a
local and broader context. Moving from the heritage of their local area,
students explore the historical features and diversity of their community as
represented in symbols and emblems of significance, and celebrations and
commemorations, both locally and in other places around the world.
Key inquiry questions
A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding
and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and
interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this level are:
 Who lived here first and how do we know?
 How has our community changed? What features have been lost and
what features have been retained?
 What is the nature of the contribution made by different groups and
individuals in the community?
Page 12 of 34
The Level 4 curriculum introduces world history and the movement of
peoples. Beginning with the history of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
peoples, students examine European exploration and colonisation in
Australia and throughout the world up to the early 1800s. Students
examine the impact of exploration on other societies, how these societies
interacted with newcomers, and how these experiences contributed to their
cultural diversity.
Key inquiry questions
A framework for developing students’ historical knowledge, understanding
and skills is provided by inquiry questions through the use and
interpretation of sources. The key inquiry questions at this level are:
 Why did the great journeys of exploration occur?
 What was life like for Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples
before the arrival of the Europeans?
 Why did the Europeans settle in Australia?
 What was the nature and consequence of contact between Aboriginal

How and why do people choose to remember significant events of the
past?
and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples and early traders, explorers and
settlers?
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS – HISTORY: Years 3 & 4
Year 3 Content
Community and
Remembrance
The importance of
Country and Place to
Aboriginal and/or
Torres Strait Islander
peoples who belong
to a local area. (This
is intended to be a
local area study with
a focus on one
Language group;
however, if
information or
sources are not
readily available,
another
representative area
may be studied)
(ACHHK060)
ONE important
example of change
and ONE important
example of
continuity over time
in the local
community, region or
state/territory; for
example, in relation
to the areas of
transport, work,
Page 13 of 34
Historical Knowledge and Understanding
Year 4 Content
Elaborations
First Contacts
Elaborations

The diversity and
longevity of
Australia’s first
peoples and the
ways Aboriginal
and/or Torres Strait
Islander peoples are
connected to Country
and Place (land, sea,
waterways and skies)
and the implications
for their daily lives.
(ACHHK077)


identifying the language groups of Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander peoples who belong
to the local area and explaining the relationship
between language, country, place and
spirituality
listening to Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander
Elders, grandparents and older community
members tell stories associated with the local
language groups and the land they belong to





investigating a development in the local
community from the time of European
settlement to the present day (for example
through photographs, newspapers, oral
histories, diaries and letters)
comparing photographs from both the past and
present of a specific location to identify the
nature of change or continuity (that is key
similarities and differences)
The journey(s) of AT
LEAST ONE world
navigator, explorer or
trader up to the late
eighteenth century,
including their
contacts with other
societies and any
impacts.
(ACHHK078)



examining early archaeological sites (for
example Nauwalabila, Malakunanja, Devil’s
Lair, Lake Mungo, Preminghana) that show the
longevity of the Aboriginal people
mapping the diversity of Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander language groups in Australia,
with particular emphasis on the local area and
state/territory
investigating pre-contact ways of life of the
Aboriginal people and/or Torres Strait
Islanders; their knowledge of their environment
including land management practices; their
sense of the interconnectedness of
Country/Place, People, Culture and Identity;
and some of their principles (such as caring for
country, caring for each other and respecting
all things)
studying totems in the lives of Aboriginal
and/or Torres Strait Islander Peoples and
examining the differences between their
totems
identifying key individuals and groups who
established contacts with Africa, the Americas,
Asia and Oceania during the age of discovery;
examining the journey of one or more of these
explorers (for example Christopher Columbus,
Vasco de Gama, Ferdinand Magellan) using
internet mapping tools, and examining their
impact on one society
using navigation maps to reconstruct the
journey of one or more explorers
investigating networks of exchange between
education, natural
and built
environments,
entertainment, daily
life (ACHHK061)
The role that people
of diverse
backgrounds have
played in the
development and
character of the local
community
(ACHHK062)
Days and weeks
celebrated or
commemorated in
Australia (including
Australia Day,
Harmony Week,
ANZAC Day,
NAIDOC week) and
the importance of
symbols and
emblems
(ACHHK063)
different groups of people




using local sites, museums and online
collections (for the local area or state/territory)
to identify the cultural groups within the local
community and their influence over time (for
example as reflected in architecture,
commercial outlets and religious buildings) and
comparing the development of the local
community with another community
Stories of the First
Fleet, including
reasons for the
journey, who
travelled to Australia,
and their experiences
following arrival.
(ACHHK079)

identifying and discussing the historical origins
of an important Australian celebration or
commemoration
generating a list of local, state and national
symbols and emblems (for example club
emblems, school logos, flags, floral emblems,
coat of arms) and discussing their origins and
significance
examining the symbolism of flags (for example
the Australian, Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander flags) and recognising special
occasions when they are flown (for example all
three flags are flown during NAIDOC week,
National Reconciliation Week, Sorry Day and
MABO day)
The nature of contact
between Aboriginal
people and/or Torres
Strait Islanders and
others, for example,
the Macassans and
the Europeans, and
the effects of these
interactions on, for
example families and
the environment
(ACHHK080)






Celebrations and
Page 14 of 34

comparing the significance of national days in
discussing reasons for the First Fleet journey,
including an examination of the wide range of
crimes punishable by transportation, and
looking at the groups who were transported
discussing the treatment of prisoners at that
time, and past and present views on the
colonisation of Australia; investigating the daily
lives and social standing of those who travelled
to Australia on the First Fleet, including
families, children and convict guards
investigating contact with Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander peoples before 1788 (for
example the repulsion of the Dutch at Cape
Keerweer in 1606 and the trade between the
Macassans and the Yolngu people)
comparing the European concept of land
ownership with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples' relationship with the land and
sea, and how this affected relations between
them
exploring early contact history with the British
(for example Pemulwuy or the Black War) and
the impact that British colonisation had on the
lives of Aboriginal people (dispossession,
dislocation and the loss of lives through
conflict, disease, loss of food sources and
medicines)
exploring whether the interactions between
Europeans and Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples had positive or negative
effects
examining landscape paintings and accounts
of flora and fauna (by observers such as
Watkin Tench and David Collins) to determine
the impact of early British colonisation on the
environment
commemorations in
other places around
the world; for
example, Bastille
Day in France,
Independence Day
in the USA, including
those that are
observed in Australia
such as Chinese
New Level,
Christmas Day,
Diwali, Easter,
Hanukkah, the Moon
Festival and
Ramadan
(ACHHK064)
Year 3 Skills
Chronology, terms
and concepts
Sequence historical
people and events
(ACHHS065)
Use historical terms
(ACHHS066)
Historical questions
and research
Pose a range of
questions about the
past (ACHHS067)
Page 15 of 34


different countries, looking at why they
developed and elements they have in common
viewing on the internet videos of celebrations of
significant days, such as Independence Day in
Greece
investigating the origins and significance of
international celebrations or commemorations
(for example the International Day of Peace)
and of celebrations important to particular
cultural groups in Australia and in other
countries
Historical Skills
Year 4 Skills
Elaborations
Chronology, terms
and concepts
Sequence historical
 developing an annotated timeline or other
people and events
visual representation of key stages of
(ACHHS081)
settlement, which features local, regional
or state events and people of historical
significance
Use historical terms
 using historical terms (such as
(ACHHS082)
immigration, exploration, development,
settlement and naming days of
commemoration and emblems) when
speaking, writing, and illustrating

using acronyms (for example NAIDOC,
ANZAC) and understanding their meaning
Elaborations
Historical questions
and research
Pose a range of
 posing appropriate questions when
questions about the
investigating the contribution that
past (ACHHS083)
individuals and groups have made to the
development of the local community
('Who?' 'What?' 'When?' 'Where?' 'Why?')

posing appropriate questions when
Elaborations

placing key events and people of early contact
history in chronological order by creating
timelines and explaining the sequence

using historical terms when talking about the
past (for example ‘penal’, ‘transportation’,
‘navigation’, ‘frontier conflict’, ‘colonisation’)
identifying the origins of place names in
Australia (for example those named by French
explorers, Aboriginal place names)

Elaborations


generating questions about the diversity and
antiguity of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
peoples, and the nature of contact in early
Australia (for example 'Who?' 'What?' 'When?'
'Where?' 'Why?' questions)
posing questions about explorers (for example
investigating the establishment of a local
community ('How did people settle?' 'Who
were they?' 'Why did they come to the
area?')
Identify sources
(ACHHS215)
Analysis and use of
sources
Locate relevant
information from
sources provided
(ACHHS068)
Perspectives and
interpretations
Identify different points
of view (ACHHS069)
Explanation and
communication
Develop texts,
particularly narratives
(ACHHS070)

identifying sources to investigate change in
the community in the past, such as
photographs, maps, and the remains of
buildings
Elaborations

analysing a range of sources (for example
photographs, maps, oral histories) to
locate information about the people, places
and events in their community’s present
and past

using information technologies to organise
information and make connections (for
example creating tables in word
processing software, concept mapping)
Elaborations

Elaborations


Use a range of
communication forms
(oral, graphic, written)
and digital
Page 16 of 34
identifying the meaning of celebrations
from different perspectives (for example
Australia Day for Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander peoples compared with
Anglo-Australians)


writing narratives about the community’s
past based on researched facts,
characters and events
composing historical texts (for example a
biography on a noteworthy individual or
group, a report on a significant event)
creating and editing a presentation (for
example one that includes text, images
and sounds) to record and explain the past
creating an oral, written, pictorial or digital

'Who were they? 'Where were they from?'
'Where did they go?' 'What did they do?')
posing questions about the First Fleet (for
example 'Why did the First Fleet travel to
Australia?' 'Who was on it?' 'What were their
stories?' 'What was the journey like?')
identifying sources to investigate the story of the
First Fleet and its arrival, such as paintings,
maps, written records/accounts
Identify sources
(ACHHS216)

Analysis and use of
sources
Locate relevant
information from
sources provided
(ACHHS084)
Elaborations
Perspectives and
interpretations
Identify different points
of view (ACHHS085)
Elaborations
Explanation and
communication
Develop texts,
particularly narratives
(ACHHS086)


exploring different stories about contact
experiences and early penal life to discover the
thoughts or feelings of the people at that time
(for example convicts, Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander people, convict guards, free
settlers)
Elaborations


Use a range of
communication forms
(oral, graphic, written)
and digital
finding historical information to determine the
nature of colonial settlement, the impact of
significant events and the role of individuals in
shaping a colony


listing key events and people’s experiences and
linking them together to form a narrative about
the past
recounting the experiences of an individual
based on researched facts (for example a
biography, diary or journal of a navigator or
convict on the First Fleet)
creating charts, pictorial stories, maps, digital
and oral presentations to explain the past
making a podcast that features a story from the
First Fleet
technologies
(ACHHS071)
representation to reflect the diverse
‘character’ of the community today
technologies
(ACHHS087)
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH LEVEL DESCRIPTION Years 3 & 4
The English curriculum is built around the three interrelated strands of Language, Literature and Literacy. Teaching and learning programs should
balance and integrate all three strands. Together the strands focus on developing students’ knowledge, understanding and skills in listening, reading,
viewing, speaking, writing and creating. Learning in English builds on concepts, skills and processes developed in earlier levels, and teachers will revisit
and strengthen these as needed.
The range of literary texts for Foundation to Level 10 comprises Australian literature, including the oral narrative traditions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander peoples, as well as the contemporary literature of these two cultural groups, and classic and contemporary world literature, including texts from
and about Asia.
Students create a range of imaginative, informative and persuasive types of texts including narratives, procedures, performances, reports, reviews,
poetry and expositions.
Australian Curriculum English Level Description Year 3
Australian Curriculum English Level Description Year 4
In Levels 3 and 4, students communicate with peers and teachers from
other classes and schools in a range of face-to-face and online/virtual
environments.
Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read,
view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the
primary purpose is to entertain, as well as texts designed to inform and
persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts including picture books,
various types of print and digital texts, simple chapter books, rhyming
verse, poetry, non-fiction film, multimodal texts, dramatic performances,
and texts used by students as models for constructing their own work.
Literary texts that support and extend students in Levels 3 and 4 as
independent readers describe complex sequences of events that extend
over several pages and involve unusual happenings within a framework of
familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about topics of
interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These
texts use complex language features, including varied sentence structures,
some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight
words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a range of
punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that both
support and extend the printed text.
Page 17 of 34
In Levels 3 and 4, students experience learning in familiar contexts and a
range of contexts that relate to study in other areas of the curriculum. They
interact with peers and teachers from other classes and schools in a range
of face-to-face and online/virtual environments.
Students engage with a variety of texts for enjoyment. They listen to, read,
view and interpret spoken, written and multimodal texts in which the
primary purpose is aesthetic, as well as texts designed to inform and
persuade. These encompass traditional oral texts including Aboriginal
stories, picture books, various types of print and digital texts, simple
chapter books, rhyming verse, poetry, non-fiction, film, multimodal texts,
dramatic performances, and texts used by students as models for
constructing their own work.
Literary texts that support and extend students in Levels 3 and 4 as
independent readers describe complex sequences of events that extend
over several pages and involve unusual happenings within a framework of
familiar experiences. Informative texts present new content about topics of
interest and topics being studied in other areas of the curriculum. These
texts use complex language features, including varied sentence structures,
some unfamiliar vocabulary, a significant number of high-frequency sight
words and words that need to be decoded phonically, and a variety of
punctuation conventions, as well as illustrations and diagrams that both
support and extend the printed text.
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM CONTENT DESCRIPTIONS AND ELABORATIONS – ENGLISH: Years 3 & 4
READING AND VIEWING
NB In AusVELS, some content and its elaborations have been moved out of the Literature strand in the AC where it belongs and into Language or
Literacy. Where a school supports Literacy development by staffing a Library with a specialist teacher-librarian, these aspects should be taught as part of
a sequential Literature program within Library lessons.
Year 3 Content
Year 4 Content
Language
Elaborations
Language
Elaborations
Understand how
Understand how
 becoming familiar with typical structural stages
 becoming familiar with the typical stages and
different types of
texts vary in
and language features of various types of text,
language features of such text types as: simple
texts vary in use of
complexity and
for example narratives, procedures, reports,
narrative, procedure, simple persuasion texts
language choices,
technicality
reviews and expositions
and information reports
depending on their
depending on the
function and
approach to the
purpose, for
topic, the purpose
example tense,
and the intended
mood, and types of
audience
sentences
(ACELA1490)
(ACELA1478)
Identify the features
Identify features of
 becoming familiar with the typical features of
 participating in online searches for information
of online texts that
online texts that
online texts, for example navigation bars and
using navigation tools and discussing similarities
enhance navigation
enhance readability
buttons, hyperlinks and sitemaps
and differences between print and digital
(ACELA1790)
including text,
information
navigation, links,
graphics and layout
(ACELA1793)
Identify the effect on  noting how the relationship between characters
Explore the effect
 examining visual and multimodal texts, building
audiences of
of choices when
can be depicted in illustrations through: the
a vocabulary to describe visual elements and
techniques, for
positioning of the characters (for example facing framing an image,
techniques such as framing, composition and
example shot size,
each other or facing away from each other); the placement of
visual point of view and beginning to understand
vertical camera
elements in the
distance between them; the relative size; one
how these choices impact on viewer response
angle and layout in
image, and
character looking up (or down) at the other
picture books,
salience on
(power relationships); facial expressions and
advertisements and
composition of still
body gesture
film segments
and moving images
 observing how images construct a relationship
(ACELA1483)
in a range of types
with the viewer through such strategies as:
of texts
direct gaze into the viewer's eyes, inviting
(ACELA1496)
involvement and how close ups are more
engaging than distanced images, which can
suggest alienation or loneliness
Recognise high
Understand how
 becoming familiar with most high-frequency
 investigating in texts how adverbial phrases and
Page 18 of 34
frequency sight
words (ACELA1486)
sight words
Literature
Draw connections
between personal
experiences and the
worlds of texts, and
share responses
with others
(ACELT1596)
Elaborations
 discussing relevant prior knowledge and past
experiences to make meaningful connections to
the people, places, events, issues and ideas in
the text
 exploring texts that highlight issues and
problems in making moral decisions and
discussing these with others
 drawing on literature from Aboriginal, Torres
Strait Islander or Asian cultures, to explore
commonalities of experience and ideas as well
as recognising difference in lifestyle and world
view
Develop criteria for
establishing
personal
preferences for
literature
(ACELT1598)

Discuss how
language is used to
describe the settings
in texts, and explore
how the settings

Page 19 of 34

building a conscious understanding of
preference regarding topics and genres of
personal interest (for example humorous short
stories, school and family stories, mysteries,
fantasy and quest, series books)
selecting and discussing favourite texts and
explaining their reasons for assigning greater or
lesser merit to particular texts or types of texts
identifying and discussing the use of descriptive
adjectives (‘in the middle of a vast, bare plain’)
to establish setting and atmosphere (‘the castle
loomed dark and forbidding’) and to draw
readers into events that follow
adverbials (adverbs
and prepositional
phrases) work in
different ways to
provide
circumstantial
details about an
activity
(ACELA1495)
Investigate how
quoted (direct) and
reported (indirect)
speech work in
different types of
text (ACELA1494)
Literature
Discuss how
authors and
illustrators make
stories exciting,
moving and
absorbing and hold
readers’ interest by
using various
techniques, for
example character
development and
plot tension
(ACELT1605)
Make connections
between the ways
different authors
may represent
similar storylines,
ideas and
relationships
(ACELT1602)
Understand,
interpret and
experiment with a
range of devices
and deliberate word
clauses can add significance to an action, for
example ‘more desperately’, ‘he rose quietly and
gingerly moved’

investigating examples of quoted (direct) speech
(‘He said, “I’ll go to the park today”’) and
reported (indirect) speech (‘He told me he was
going to the park today’) and comparing
similarities and differences
Elaborations
 examining the author’s description of a
character’s appearance, behaviour and speech
and noting how the character’s development is
evident through his or her dialogue and
changing relationships and the reactions of other
characters to him or her

identifying pivotal points in the plot where
characters are faced with choices and
commenting on how the author makes us care
about their decisions and consequences




commenting on how authors have established
setting and period in different cultures and times
and the relevance of characters, actions and
beliefs to their own time
comparing different authors’ treatment of similar
themes and text patterns, for example
comparing fables and allegories from different
cultures and quest novels by different authors
defining spoonerisms, neologisms and puns and
exploring how they are used by authors to
create a sense of freshness, originality and
playfulness
discussing poetic language, including unusual
shape the events
and influence the
mood of the
narrative
(ACELT1599)

discussing the language used to describe the
traits of characters in stories, their actions and
motivations: ‘Claire was so lonely; she
desperately wanted a pet and she was afraid
she would do anything, just anything, to have
one to care for’
Discuss the nature
and effects of some
language devices
used to enhance
meaning and shape
the reader’s
reaction, including
rhythm and
onomatopoeia in
poetry and prose
(ACELT1600)
Literacy
Identify the point of
view in a text and
suggest alternative
points of view
(ACELY1675)

identifying the effect of imagery in texts, for
example the use of imagery related to nature in
haiku poems
exploring how rhythm, onomatopoeia and
alliteration give momentum to poetry and prose
read aloud, and enhance enjoyment
Elaborations
 discussing how a text presents the point of view
of the main character, and speculating on what
other characters might think or feel
 recognising that there is more than one way of
looking at the same event and that stories seen
through the eyes of one character privileges
some aspects of the story over others
 speculating about what other characters might
think or feel and retelling the story from other
perspectives (for example ‘Cinderella’ from the
view of the ‘Ugly Sisters’)
Literacy
Identify and explain
language features
of texts from earlier
times and compare
with the vocabulary,
images, layout and
content of
contemporary texts
(ACELY1686)
Elaborations
 viewing documentaries and news footage from
different periods, comparing the style of
presentation, including costumes and
iconography with contemporary texts on similar
topics and tracking changing views on issues,
for example war, race, gender
Identify the
audience and
purpose of
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
(ACELY1678)

identifying the author’s point of view on a topic
and key words and images that seem intended
to persuade listeners, viewers or readers to
agree with the view presented

describing the language which authors use to
create imaginary worlds; how textual features
such as headings, subheadings, bold type and
graphic organisers are used to order and
present information, and how visual codes are
used, for example those used in advertising to
represent children and families so that viewers
identify with them
Read an increasing
range of different

combining different types of knowledge (for
example world knowledge, vocabulary,
Identify
characteristic
features used in
imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts to
meet the purpose
of the text
(ACELY1690)
Read different
types of texts by

reading new and different kinds of texts with the
use of established word identification strategies,
Page 20 of 34

play in poetry and
other literary texts,
for example
nonsense words,
spoonerisms,
neologisms and
puns (ACELT1606)
Use metalanguage
to describe the
effects of ideas,
text structures and
language features
of literary texts
(ACELT1604)
adjectival use and how it engages us
emotionally and brings to life the poet’s subject
matter (for example ‘He grasps the crag with
crooked hands’/wee timorous beastie)


examining the author’s description of a
character’s appearance, behaviour and speech
and noting how the character’s development is
evident through his or her dialogue and
changing relationships and the reactions of other
characters to him or her
sharing views using appropriate metalanguage
(for example ‘The use of the adjectives in
describing the character really helps to create
images for the reader’)
types of texts by
combining
contextual,
semantic,
grammatical and
phonic knowledge,
using text
processing
strategies, for
example monitoring,
predicting,
confirming,
rereading, reading
on and selfcorrecting
(ACELY1679)
Use comprehension
strategies to build
literal and inferred
meaning and begin
to evaluate texts by
drawing on a
growing knowledge
of context, text
structures and
language features
(ACELY1680)










grammar, phonics) to make decisions about
unknown words, reading on, reviewing and
summarising meaning
analysing the way illustrations help to construct
meaning and interpreting different types of
illustrations and graphics
reading text types from a student’s culture to
enhance confidence in building reading
strategies
reading aloud with fluency and intonation
reading a wider range of texts, including chapter
books and informative texts, for pleasure
combining
contextual ,
semantic,
grammatical and
phonic knowledge
using text
processing
strategies for
example monitoring
meaning, cross
checking and
reviewing
(ACELY1691)
making connections between the text and
students own experience and other texts
making connections between the information in
print and images
making predictions and asking and answering
questions about the text drawing on knowledge
of the topic, subject-specific vocabulary and
experience of texts on the same topic
using text features and search tools to locate
information in written and digital texts efficiently
determining important ideas, events or details in
texts commenting on things learned or
questions raised by reading, referring explicitly
to the text for verification
making considered inferences taking into
account topic knowledge or a character’s likely
actions and feelings
Use
comprehension
strategies to build
literal and inferred
meaning to expand
content knowledge,
integrating and
linking ideas and
analysing and
evaluating texts
(ACELY1692)











including knowledge of the topic and of text type
together with self monitoring strategies;
including rereading, self questioning and
pausing, and including self correction strategies
such confirming and cross-checking
reading aloud with fluency and expression
reading a wide range of different types of texts
for pleasure
making connections between the text and
students’ own experience and other texts
making connections between information in print
and images
building and using prior knowledge and
vocabulary
finding specific literal information
asking and answering questions
creating mental images
finding the main idea of a text
inferring meaning from the ways communication
occurs in digital environments including the
interplay between words, images, and sounds
bringing subject and technical vocabulary and
concept knowledge to new reading tasks,
selecting and using texts for their pertinence to
the task and the accuracy of their information
WRITING
Year 3 Content
Language
Understand that
paragraphs are a
key organisational
feature of written
Page 21 of 34
Elaborations
 noticing how longer texts are organised into
paragraphs, each beginning with a topic
sentence/paragraph opener which predicts how
the paragraph will develop and is then
Year 4 Content
Language
Understand how
texts are made
cohesive through
the use of linking
Elaborations
 knowing how authors construct texts that are
cohesive and coherent through the use of:
pronouns that link back to something previously
mentioned; determiners (for example ‘this’, ‘that’,
texts (ACELA1479)
elaborated in various ways
devices including
pronoun reference
and text
connectives
(ACELA1491)


Understand that a
clause is a unit of
meaning usually
containing a subject
and a verb and that
these need to be in
agreement
(ACELA1481)

Understand that
verbs represent
different processes
(doing, thinking,
saying, and relating)
and that these
processes are
anchored in time
through tense
(ACELA1482)






Understand how to
use sound–letter
relationships and
knowledge of
spelling rules,
compound words,
prefixes, suffixes,
morphemes and
less common letter
combinations, for
Page 22 of 34

knowing that a clause is basically a group of
words that contains a verb
knowing that, in terms of meaning, a basic
clause represents: what is happening; who or
what is participating, and the surrounding
circumstances
identifying different types of verbs and the way
they add meaning to a sentence
exploring action and saying verbs in narrative
texts to show how they give information about
what characters do and say
exploring the use of sensing verbs and how
they allow readers to know what characters
think and feel
exploring the use of relating verbs in
constructing definitions and descriptions
learning how time is represented through the
tense of a verb and other structural, language
and visual features
using spelling strategies such as: phonological
knowledge (for example diphthongs and other
ambiguous vowel sounds in more complex
words); three-letter clusters (for example 'thr',
'shr', 'squ'); visual knowledge (for example more
complex single syllable homophones such as
'break/brake', 'ate/eight'); morphemic knowledge
(for example inflectional endings in single
syllable words, plural and past tense);
generalisations (for example to make a word
‘these’, ‘those’, ‘the’, ‘his’, ‘their’); text
connectives that create links between sentences
(for example ‘however’, ‘therefore’,
‘nevertheless’, ‘in addition’, ‘by contrast’, ‘in
summary’)
identifying how a topic is described throughout a
text by tracking noun groups and pronouns
describing how texts connectives link sections of
a text providing sequences through time, for
example ‘firstly’, ‘then’, ‘next’, and ‘finally’
creating richer, more specific descriptions
through the use of noun groups (for example in
narrative texts, 'Their very old Siamese cat'; in
reports, 'Its extremely high mountain ranges'
Understand that the
meaning of
sentences can be
enriched through
the use of noun and
verb groups and
prepositional
phrases
(ACELA1493)
Incorporate new
vocabulary from a
range of sources
into students’ own
texts including
vocabulary
encountered in
research
(ACELA1498)


building etymological knowledge about word
origins (for example 'thermometer') and building
vocabulary from research about technical and
subject specific topics
Understand how to
use strategies for
spelling words,
including spelling
rules, knowledge of
morphemic word
families, spelling
generalisations,
and letter
combinations

using phonological knowledge (for example long
vowel patterns in multi-syllabic words);
consonant clusters (for example 'straight',
'throat', 'screen', 'squawk')
using visual knowledge (for example diphthongs
in more complex words and other ambiguous
vowel sounds, as in 'oy', 'oi', 'ou', 'ow', 'ould', 'u',
'ough', 'au', 'aw'); silent beginning consonant
patterns (for example 'gn' and 'kn')
applying generalisations, for example doubling


example ‘tion’
(ACELA1485)
Know that word
contractions are a
feature of informal
language and that
apostrophes of
contraction are used
to signal missing
letters (ACELA1480)
plural when it ends in 's', 'sh', 'ch', or 'z' add 'es')

recognising both grammatically accurate and
inaccurate usage of the apostrophe in everyday
texts such as signs in the community and
newspaper advertisements

Literature
Create imaginative
texts based on
characters, settings
and events from
students’ own and
other cultures using
visual features, for
example
perspective,
distance and angle
(ACELT1601)
Create texts that
adapt language
features and
patterns
encountered in
literary texts, for
example
characterisation,
rhyme, rhythm,
mood, music, sound
effects and dialogue
(ACELT1791)
Literacy
Page 23 of 34
Elaborations
 drawing on literary texts read, viewed and
listened to for inspiration and ideas,
appropriating language to create mood and
characterisation
 innovating on texts read, viewed and listened to
by changing the point of view, revising an
ending or creating a sequel


creating visual and multimodal texts based on
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander or Asian
literature, applying one or more visual elements
to convey the intent of the original text
creating multimodal texts that combine visual
images, sound effects, music and voice overs to
convey settings and events in a fantasy world
Elaborations
including double
letters
(ACELA1779)
Recognise
homophones and
know how to use
context to identify
correct spelling
(ACELA1780)
(for example 'running'); 'e'-drop (for example
'hoping')

using meaning and context when spelling words
(for example when differentiating between
homophones such as ‘to’, ‘too’, ‘two’
Recognise how
quotation marks are
used in texts to
signal dialogue,
titles and reported
speech
(ACELA1492)
Literature
Create literary texts
by developing
storylines,
characters and
settings
(ACELT1794)

exploring texts to identify the use of quotation
marks
experimenting with the use of quotation marks in
students’ own writing
Create literary texts
that explore
students’ own
experiences and
imagining
(ACELT1607)

Literacy
Elaborations

Elaborations
 collaboratively plan, compose, sequence and
prepare a literary text along a familiar storyline,
using film, sound and images to convey setting,
characters and points of drama in the plot
drawing upon literary texts students have
encountered and experimenting with changing
particular aspects, for example the time or place
of the setting, adding characters or changing
their personalities, or offering an alternative
point of view on key ideas
Plan, draft and
publish imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
demonstrating
increasing control
over text structures
and language
features and
selecting print,and
multimodal elements
appropriate to the
audience and
purpose
(ACELY1682)
Reread and edit
texts for meaning,
appropriate
structure,
grammatical choices
and punctuation
(ACELY1683)


using glossaries, print and digital dictionaries
and spell check to edit spelling, realising that
spell check accuracy depends on understanding
the word function, for example there/their;
rain/reign
Write using joined
letters that are
clearly formed and
consistent in size
(ACELY1684)

practising how to join letters to construct a fluent
handwriting style
Use software
including word
processing
programs with
growing speed and
efficiency to
construct and edit
texts featuring
visual, print and
audio elements
(ACELY1685)

using features of relevant technologies to plan,
sequence, compose and edit multimodal texts
Page 24 of 34



using print and digital resources to gather
information about a topic
selecting appropriate text structure for a writing
purpose and sequencing content for clarity and
audience impact
using appropriate simple, compound and
complex sentences to express and combine
ideas
using vocabulary, including technical
vocabulary, relevant to the text type and
purpose, and appropriate sentence structures to
express and combine ideas
Plan, draft and
publish imaginative,
informative and
persuasive texts
containing key
information and
supporting details
for a widening
range of audiences,
demonstrating
increasing control
over text structures
and language
features
(ACELY1694)
Reread and edit for
meaning by adding,
deleting or moving
words or word
groups to improve
content and
structure
(ACELY1695)
Write using clearlyformed joined
letters, and develop
increased fluency
and automaticity
(ACELY1696)
Use a range of
software including
word processing
programs to
construct, edit and
publish written text,
and select, edit and
place visual, print
and audio elements
(ACELY1697)

using research from print and digital resources
to gather ideas, integrating information from a
range of sources; selecting text structure and
planning how to group ideas into paragraphs to
sequence content, and choosing vocabulary to
suit topic and communication purpose

using appropriate simple, compound and
complex sentences to express and combine
ideas

using grammatical features effectively including
different types of verbs, adverbials and noun
groups for lengthier descriptions

revising written texts: editing for grammatical
and spelling accuracy and clarity of the text, to
improve the connection between ideas and the
overall flow of the piece

using handwriting fluency with speed for a wide
range of tasks

identifying and selecting appropriate software
programs for constructing text
SPEAKING AND LISTENING
Year 3 Content
Language
Understand that
languages have
different written and
visual
communication
systems, different
oral traditions and
different ways of
constructing
meaning
(ACELA1475)
Understand that
successful
cooperation with
others depends on
shared use of social
conventions,
including turn-taking
patterns, and forms
of address that vary
according to the
degree of formality
in social situations
(ACELA1476)
Elaborations
 learning that a word or sign can carry different
weight in different cultural contexts, for example
that particular respect is due to some people
and creatures and that stories can be passed
on to teach us how to live appropriately

Examine how
evaluative language
can be varied to be
more or less forceful
(ACELA1477)

Learn extended and
technical vocabulary

Page 25 of 34

identifying roles and collaborative patterns in
students’ own groups and pair work (for
example initiating a topic, changing a topic
through negotiation, affirming other speakers
and building on their comments, asking relevant
questions, providing useful feedback, prompting
and checking individual and group
understanding)
exploring how modal verbs, for example ‘must’,
‘might’,’ or ‘could’ indicate degrees of certainty,
command or obligation
distinguishing how choice of adverbs, nouns
and verbs present different evaluations of
characters in texts
exploring examples of language which
demonstrate a range of feelings and positions,
Year 4 Content
Language
Understand that
Standard Australian
English is one of
many social
dialects used in
Australia, and that
while it originated in
England it has been
influenced by many
other languages
(ACELA1487)
Understand that
social interactions
influence the way
people engage with
ideas and respond
to others for
example when
exploring and
clarifying the ideas
of others,
summarising
students' own
views and reporting
them to a larger
group
(ACELA1488)
Understand
differences
between the
language of opinion
and feeling and the
language of factual
reporting or
recording
(ACELA1489)
Elaborations
 identifying words used in Standard Australian
English that are derived from other languages,
including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
languages, and determining if the original
meaning is reflected in English usage, for
example kangaroo, tsunami, typhoon, amok,
orang-utan
 identifying commonly used words derived from
other cultures





recognising that we can use language differently
with our friends and families, but that Standard
Australian English is typically used in written
school texts and more formal contexts
recognising that language is adjusted in different
contexts, for example in degree of formality
when moving between group discussions and
presenting a group report
understanding how age, status, expertise and
familiarity influence the ways in which we
interact with people and how these codes and
conventions vary across cultures
recognising the importance of using inclusive
language
identifying ways thinking verbs are used to
express opinion, for example ‘I think’, ‘I believe’,
and ways summary verbs are used to report
findings, for example ‘we concluded’
and ways of
expressing opinion
including modal
verbs and adverbs
(ACELA1484)
Literature
Discuss texts in
which characters,
events and settings
are portrayed in
different ways, and
speculate on the
authors’ reasons
(ACELT1594)
and building a vocabulary to express judgments
about characters or events, acknowledging that
language and judgments might differ depending
on the cultural context
Elaborations
 reading texts in which Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander children/ young people are the
central characters/protagonists and making
links to students’ own lives, noting similarities
 exploring the ways that the same story can be
told in many cultures, identifying variations in
the storyline and in music (for example ‘The
Ramayana’ story which is told to children in
India, Indonesia, Thailand, Cambodia, Burma,
Laos, Tibet and Malaysia)
Literature
Discuss literary
experiences with
others, sharing
responses and
expressing a point
of view
(ACELT1603)
Literacy
Listen to and
contribute to
conversations and
discussions to share
information and
ideas and negotiate
in collaborative
situations
(ACELY1676)
Elaborations
 participating in collaborative discussions,
building on and connecting ideas and opinions
expressed by others, and checking students’
own understanding against group views
Use interaction
skills, including
active listening
behaviours and
communicate in a
clear, coherent
manner using a
variety of everyday
and learned
vocabulary and
appropriate tone,
pace, pitch and
volume

Literacy
Interpret ideas and
information in
spoken texts and
listen for key points
in order to carry out
tasks and use
information to share
and extend ideas
and information
(ACELY1687)
Use interaction
skills such as
acknowledging
another’s point of
view and linking
students’ response
to the topic, using
familiar and new
vocabulary and a
range of vocal
effects such as
tone, pace, pitch
and volume to
Page 26 of 34



participating in pair, group and class speaking
and listening situations, including informal
conversations, class discussions and
presentations
listening actively including listening for specific
information, recognising the value of others’
contributions and responding through
comments, recounts and summaries of
information
learning the specific speaking or listening skills
of different group roles, for example group
leader, note taker and reporter
acquiring new vocabulary in all curriculum areas
Elaborations
 sharing and discussing students’ own and
others’ understanding of the effects of particular
literary techniques on their appreciation of texts

drawing comparisons between multiple texts and
students’ own experiences. Commenting orally,
in written form and in digital reviews on aspects
such as: 'Do I recognise this in my own world?';
'How is this text similar to or different from other
texts I’ve read?'; 'How common is it to human
experience in the real world?'; 'What new ideas
does it bring?'; ’How do they fit with what I
believe?'
Elaborations
 making notes about a task, asking questions to
clarify or follow up information, and seeking
assistance if required
 discussing levels of language — slang,
colloquial (everyday) and formal language —
and how their appropriateness changes with the
situation and audience. Presenting ideas and
opinions at levels of formality appropriate to the
context and audience




participating in pair, group, class and school
speaking and listening situations, including
informal conversations, class discussions and
presentations
developing appropriate speaking and listening
behaviours including acknowledging and
extending others’ contributions, presenting ideas
and opinions clearly and coherently
choosing a variety of appropriate words and
prepositional phrases, including descriptive
words and some technical vocabulary, to
communicate meaning accurately
exploring the effects of changing voice tone,
(ACELY1792)


Plan and deliver
short presentations,
providing some key
details in logical
sequence
(ACELY1677)
Page 27 of 34

through listening, reading, viewing and
discussion and using this vocabulary in specific
ways such as describing people, places, things
and processes
using language appropriately in different
situations such as making a request of a
teacher, explaining a procedure to a classmate,
engaging in a game with friends
experimenting with voice effects in formal
presentations such as tone, volume and pace
drawing on relevant research into a topic to
prepare an oral or multimodal presentation,
using devices such as storyboards to plan the
sequence of ideas and information
speak clearly and
coherently
(ACELY1688)
Plan, rehearse and
deliver
presentations
incorporating
learned content and
taking into account
the particular
purposes and
audiences
(ACELY1689)
volume, pitch and pace in formal and informal
contexts

reporting on a topic in an organised manner,
providing relevant facts and descriptive detail to
enhance audience understanding, and
beginning to refer to reliable sources to support
claims
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM PRIORITIES
Aboriginal
and Torres
Strait
Islander
histories and
cultures
Asia and
Australia’s
Engagement
with Asia
Sustainability
Page 28 of 34
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are strong, rich and diverse. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Identity is central to
this priority and is intrinsically linked to living, learning Aboriginal and Torres Strait I slander communities, deep knowledge traditions and
holistic world view.
A conceptual framework based on Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples’ unique sense of Identity has been developed as a
structural tool for the embedding of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures within the Australian curriculum. This
sense of Identity is approached through the interconnected aspects of Country/Place, People and Culture. Embracing these elements
enhances all areas of the curriculum.
The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander priority provides opportunities for all learners to deepen their knowledge of Australia by
engaging with the world’s oldest continuous living cultures. This knowledge and understanding will enrich their ability to participate
positively in the ongoing development of Australia.
The Australian Curriculum: mathematics values Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander histories and cultures. It provides opportunities for
students to appreciate that Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander societies have sophisticated applications of mathematical concepts.
Students will explore connections between representations of number and pattern and how they relate to aspects of Aboriginal and
Torres Strait Islander cultures. They will investigate time, place, relationships and measurement concepts in Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander contexts. Students will deepen their understanding of the lives of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Peoples through the
application and evaluation of statistical data.
The Asia and Australia’s engagement with Asia priority provides a regional context for learning in all areas of the curriculum. China,
India and other Asian nations are growing rapidly and the power and influence they have in all areas of global endeavour is extensive.
An understanding of Asia underpins the capacity of Australian students to be active and informed citizens working together to build
harmonious local, regional and global communities, and build Australia’s social, intellectual and creative capital.
This priority is concerned with Asia literacy for all Australian students. Asia literacy develops knowledge, skills and understanding about
the histories, geographies, cultures, arts, literatures and languages of the diverse countries of our region. It fosters social inclusion in the
Australian community. It enables students to communicate and engage with the peoples of Asia so they can effectively live, work and
learn in the region.
Australia now has extensive engagement with Asia in areas such as trade, investment, immigration, tourism, education and
humanitarian assistance and this engagement is vital to the prosperity of all Australians.
The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides opportunities for students to learn about the understandings and applications of
mathematics in Asia. In the past, mathematicians from the Asia region have made significant contributions to the development of the
human understanding of number, algebra and trigonometry.
Mathematicians from Asia continue to contribute to the ongoing development of mathematical understanding. In this learning area,
students investigate the concept of chance using Asian games. They explore the way Asian societies apply other mathematical
concepts such as patterns and symmetry in art and architecture. Investigations involving data collection and representation can be used
to examine issues pertinent to the Asia region.
Sustainability addresses the ongoing capacity of Earth to maintain all life.
Sustainable patterns of living meet the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs.
Actions to improve sustainability are both individual and collective endeavours shared across local and global communities. They
necessitate a renewed and balanced approach to the way humans interact with each other and the environment.
Education for sustainability develops the knowledge, skills and values necessary for people to act in ways that contribute to more
sustainable patterns of living. It is futures-oriented, focusing on protecting environments and creating a more ecologically and socially
just world through action that recognises the relevance and interdependence of environmental, social, cultural and economic
considerations.
The Australian Curriculum: mathematics provides the foundation for the exploration of issues of sustainability. It equips students with the
skills of measurement, mathematical modelling, and data collection, representation and analysis. These skills are needed to investigate
data, evaluate and communicate findings and to make predictions based on those findings.
Mathematical understandings and skills are necessary to monitor and quantify both the impact of human activity on ecosystems and
changes to conditions in the biosphere. Actions to improve sustainability involve students in processes such as auditing, reading
measures and gauges, and interpreting data on invoices and accounts. Mathematical and statistical analysis enables informed decision
making about present and future action.
Learning in mathematics involves the use of knowledge and skills learnt in other areas, particularly in English, science and history.
The Australian National Numeracy Review Report (2008) identified numeracy as requiring an across-the-school commitment, including
mathematical, strategic and contextual aspects. This across-the-school commitment can be managed by including specific references to
other curriculum areas in the mathematics curriculum, and the identification of key numeracy capacities in the descriptions of other
curriculum areas being developed. For example, the following are some of the numeracy perspectives that could be relevant to English,
science and history.
Page 29 of 34
ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS
VICTORIAN ESSENTIAL LEARNING STANDARDS (VELS) ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS
VELS Humanities Standards Years 3 & 4
Humanities knowledge and understanding
At Level 3, students describe and sequence some key events in Australian history, some key commemorations and celebrations including Anzac Day,
and key aspects of the histories of cultural groups that make up their class, community and nation. They describe how aspects of places in their local
area have changed over time. From direct observation or observation of a variety of media, they describe the human and physical characteristics of their
local area and other parts of Victoria. They describe how people use and affect different environments in Victoria.
Humanities skills
At Level 3, students use a range of historical evidence, including oral history, artefacts, narratives and pictures, to retell events and describe historical
characters. They develop simple timelines to show events in sequence. They explain some of the differences between different types of historical
evidence, and frame questions to further explore historical events. Students draw simple maps and plans of familiar environments observing basic
mapping conventions. They identify the location of places on a simple map using an alphanumeric grid and describe direction using the four cardinal
compass points. Using atlas maps and a globe, they locate and name the states and territories of Australia.
Page 30 of 34
VELS English Standards Years 3 & 4
Speaking and listening Standard Level 3
At Level 3, students vary their speaking and listening for a small range of contexts, purposes and audiences. They project their voice adequately for an
audience, use appropriate spoken language features, and modify spoken texts to clarify meaning and information.
They listen attentively to spoken texts, including factual texts, and identify the topic, retell information accurately, ask clarifying questions, volunteer
information and justify opinions.
Reading Standard Level 3
At Level 3, students read and respond to an increasing range of imaginative and informative texts with some unfamiliar ideas and information, vocabulary
and textual features. They interpret the main ideas and purpose of texts. They make inferences from imaginative text about plot and setting and about
characters’ qualities, motives and actions. They infer meaning from material presented in informative texts. They identify how language is used to
represent information, characters, people, places and events in different ways including identification of some simple symbolic meanings and
stereotypes. They use several strategies to locate, select and record key information from texts.
Writing Standard Level 3
At Level 3, students write texts containing several logically ordered paragraphs that express opinions and include ideas and information about familiar
topics. They write narratives which include characters, setting and plot. They order information and sequence events using some detail or illustrative
evidence, and they express a point of view providing some information and supporting detail. They combine verbal and visual elements in the texts they
produce. They meet the needs of audiences by including appropriate background information.
They write a variety of simple and compound sentences and use verb tenses correctly. They use punctuation to support meaning, including exclamation
marks and quotation marks, and accurately use full stops, commas and question marks. They use vocabulary appropriate to context and spell most oneand two-syllable words with regular spelling patterns, and frequently used words which have less regular spelling patterns. They use sound and visual
patterns when attempting to spell unfamiliar words.
VELS Thinking Processes Standards Years 3 & 4
Reasoning, processing and inquiry
At Level 3, students collect information from a range of sources to answer their own and others’ questions. They question the validity of sources when
appropriate. They apply thinking strategies to organise information and concepts in a variety of contexts, including problem solving activities. They
provide reasons for their conclusions.
Creativity
At Level 3, students apply creative ideas in practical ways and test the possibilities of ideas they generate. They use open-ended questioning and
integrate available information to explore ideas.
Reflection, evaluation and metacognition
At Level 3, students identify strategies they use to organise their ideas, and use appropriate language to explain their thinking. They identify and provide
reasons for their point of view, and justify changes in their thinking.
VELS Personal Learning Standards Years 3 & 4
The individual learner
At Level 3, students describe the factors that affect learning and identify strategies that will enhance their own learning. With support, they identify their
learning strengths and weaknesses and learning habits that improve learning outcomes. They seek teacher feedback to develop their content knowledge
and understanding. They make and justify some decisions about their learning and, with support, set learning improvement goals. They contribute to the
development of protocols that create a positive learning environment in the classroom.
Page 31 of 34
Managing personal learning
At Level 3, students set short-term, achievable goals in relation to specific tasks. They complete short tasks by planning and allocating appropriate time
and resources. They undertake some multi-step, extended tasks independently. They comment on task progress and achievements. They manage their
feelings in pursuit of goals and demonstrate a positive attitude towards their learning.
VELS Interpersonal Learning Standards Years 3 & 4
Building social relationships
At Level 3, students demonstrate respect for others and exhibit appropriate behaviour for maintaining friendships with other people. They support each
other by sharing ideas and materials, offering assistance, giving appropriate feedback and acknowledging individual differences. They work with others to
reduce, avoid and resolve conflict.
Working in teams
At Level 3, students cooperate with others in teams for agreed purposes, taking roles and following guidelines established within the task. They describe
and evaluate their own contribution and the team’s progress towards the achievement of agreed goals.
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS – HISTORY
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM HISTORY Years 3 & 4
Year 3 History achievement standard
Year 4 History achievement standard
By the end of Level 3, students explain how communities changed in the
By the end of Level 4, students explain how and why life changed in the
past. They describe the experiences of an individual or group. They identify past, and identify aspects of the past that remained the same. They
events and aspects of the past that have significance in the present.
describe the experiences of an individual or group over time. They
Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological
recognise the significance of events in bringing about change.
order, with reference to key dates. They pose questions about the past and Students sequence events and people (their lifetime) in chronological order
locate information from sources (written, physical, visual, oral) to answer
to identify key dates. They pose a range of questions about the past. They
these questions. Students develop texts, including narratives, using terms
identify sources (written, physical, visual, oral), and locate information to
denoting time.
answer these questions. They recognise different points of view. Students
develop and present texts, including narratives, using historical terms.
Page 32 of 34
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ACHIEVEMENT STANDARDS – ENGLISH
AUSTRALIAN CURRICULUM ENGLISH Years 3 & 4
Year 3 Reading and viewing achievement standard
By the end of Level 3, students understand how content can be organised
using different text structures depending on the purpose of the text. They
understand how language features, images and vocabulary choices are
used for different effects. They read texts that contain varied sentence
structures, a range of punctuation conventions, and images that provide
additional information. They identify literal and implied meaning connecting
ideas in different parts of a text. They select information, ideas and events
in texts that relate to their own lives and to other texts.
Year 3 Writing achievement standard
Their texts include writing and images to express and develop in some
detail experiences, events, information, ideas and characters. They
demonstrate understanding of grammar and choose vocabulary and
punctuation appropriate to the purpose and context of their writing. They
use knowledge of sounds and high frequency words to spell words
accurately, checking their work for meaning. They legibly write using
consistently sized joined letters.
Year 3 Speaking and listening achievement standard
Students listen to others’ views and respond appropriately. They
understand how language features are used to link and sequence ideas.
They understand how language can be used to express feelings and
opinions on topics. They create a range of texts for familiar and unfamiliar
audiences. They contribute actively to class and group discussions, asking
questions, providing useful feedback and making presentations.
Page 33 of 34
Year 4 Reading and viewing achievement standard
By the end of Level 4, students understand that texts have different
structures depending on the purpose and audience. They explain how
language features, images and vocabulary are used to engage the interest
of audiences. They describe literal and implied meaning connecting ideas
in different texts. They express preferences for particular texts, and
respond to others’ viewpoints.
Year 4 Writing achievement standard
Students use language features to create coherence and add detail to their
texts. They understand how to express an opinion based on information in
a text. They create texts that show understanding of how images and detail
can be used to extend key ideas. Students create structured texts to
explain ideas for different audiences. They demonstrate understanding of
grammar, select vocabulary from a range of resources and use accurate
spelling and punctuation, editing their work to improve meaning.
Year 4 Speaking and Listening achievement standard
Students listen for key points in discussions. They use language features to
create coherence and add detail to their texts. They understand how to
express an opinion based on information in a text. They create texts that
show understanding of how images and detail can be used to extend key
ideas. Students create structured texts to explain ideas for different
audiences. They make presentations and contribute actively to class and
group discussions, varying language according to context.
PoLT (Principles of Learning and Teaching)
PoLT focus
to be
embedded
in this unit.
Page 34 of 34
Students learn best when these Principles of Learning and Teaching are embedded in classroom practice:
The learning environment is supportive and productive.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
1.1 builds positive relationships through knowing and valuing each student
1.2 promotes a culture of value and respect for individuals and their communities
1.3 uses strategies that promote students’ self-confidence and willingness to take risks with their learning
1.4 ensures each student experiences success through structured support, the valuing of effort, and recognition of their work.
The learning environment promotes independence, interdependence and self-motivation.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
2.1 encourages and supports students to take responsibility for their learning
2.2 uses strategies that build skills of productive collaboration.
Students' needs, backgrounds, perspectives and interests are reflected in the learning program.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
3.1 uses strategies that are flexible and responsive to the values, needs and interests of individual students
3.2 uses a range of strategies that support the different ways of thinking and learning
3.3 builds on students’ prior experiences, knowledge and skills
3.4 capitalises on students’ experience of a technology rich world.
Students are challenged and supported to develop deep levels of thinking and application.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
4.1 plans sequences to promote sustained learning that builds over time and emphasises connections between ideas
4.2 promotes substantive discussion of ideas
4.3 emphasises the quality of learning with high expectations of achievement
4.4 uses strategies that challenge and support students to question and reflect
4.5 uses strategies to develop investigating and problem solving skills
4.6 uses strategies to foster imagination and creativity.
Assessment practices are an integral part of teaching and learning.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
5.1 designs assessment practices that reflect the full range of learning program objectives
5.2 ensures that students receive frequent constructive feedback that supports further learning
5.3 makes assessment criteria explicit
5.4 uses assessment practices that encourage reflection and self assessment
5.5 uses evidence from assessment to inform planning and teaching.
Learning connects strongly with communities and practice beyond the classroom.
In learning environments that reflect this principle the teacher:
6.1 supports students to engage with contemporary knowledge and practice
6.2 plans for students to interact with local and broader communities
6.3 uses technologies in ways that reflect professional and community practices.
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