ALA Midwinter 2015 SJC Presentation - FINAL

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The Social Justice Collaboratorium:
Illuminating Research Pathways
Between Social Justice Issues and LIS
ALA Midwinter 2015
Panel Presentation by the
2013 ALA Spectrum Doctoral Cohort
Saturday, January 31, 2015
@SJCollaborate
ALISE 2015 Panel Presentation
2013 ALA Spectrum Doctoral Cohort
Moderator: Mario H. Ramirez, Department of Information Studies, University of California, Los Angeles
Panelists: RaShauna Brannon, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois,
Urbana-Champaign
LaVerne Gray, College of Communication and Information, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Miraida Morales, School of Communication & Information, Rutgers University
Myrna Morales, Graduate School of Library and Information Science, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Elnora Tayag, School of Information & Library Science, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
2013 ALA Spectrum Doctoral Cohort
http://www.ala.org/offices/diversity/spectrum/phd
Definitions of Social Justice
“Justice” is often used as a legal term that describes the administration
and maintenance of fair laws.[4] The term “social justice” expands the
notion of justice, referring to an ideal in which justice is achieved in every
aspect of society, not simply the legal sphere.[5]
Although social justice has been explored in philosophical, political,
religious, and other contexts, no universally accepted, all-encompassing
definition of “social justice” has emerged.
Mehra, B., Rioux, K. & Albright, K. (2009). Social justice in library and information science. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.
p. 4820
Definitions of Social Justice
Tensions:
1. The individual’s right to choose his/her own ends;
2. Conflicts with other individual’s rights to make similar choices;
3. The debate on individual rights vs. the good of the community
Mehra, B., Rioux, K. & Albright, K. (2009). Social justice in library and information science. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.
p. 4821
Social Justice in LIS – Theory and Practice
• Importance of outcome-based, socially relevant evaluation methods in
assessing library services
• Value of local experiences and ontologies and their representation into
formalized organizational tools of information
• Necessity in building equitable partnering efforts with disenfranchised
constituencies
Social Justice in Libraries - Reality
Libraries today are considered notable models of service to local and
recently global communities, and are expected to be unequivocally
immersed in pursuing this dictum.[125] But the implications of such a
position for libraries, in terms of a social justice agenda, are not quite
clear. LIS and its professional service orientation can be considered from
a social justice perspective, specifically by examining the underlying
power vested in libraries that has been historically perpetuated through
social contract in the American public sphere.
M. Bharat, K. Rioux, & K. Albright (2009). Social justice in library and information science. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.
p. 4824
Social Justice in Libraries - Reality
Recognizing the limitations of past service-based ethics in the profession
(i.e. biased language constructs)
Adopting more progressive concepts and practices (i.e. community
engagement, community-based action research, collaborative learning)
Mehra, B., Rioux, K. & Albright, K. (2009). Social justice in library and information science. Encyclopedia of Library and Information Sciences.
p. 4826
IS Social Justice Theoretical Assumptions
Assumption #1
“All human beings have an inherent worth
and deserve information services that help
address their information needs”
(Rioux, 2010, p. 13).
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A Nascent Social Justice Approach. Journal
of Education for Library & Information Science, 51, 9-17.
IS Social Justice Theoretical Assumptions
Assumption #2
“People perceive reality and information in
different ways, often within cultural or life
role contexts. These contexts should be
acknowledged when planning or implementing
information services” (Rioux, 2010, p. 13).
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A Nascent Social Justice Approach. Journal
of Education for Library & Information Science, 51, 9-17.
IS Social Justice Theoretical Assumptions
Assumption #3
“There are many different types of information
and knowledge, and these are societal
resources. Widely available access to this
information and knowledge is a common
good that should be promoted and maintained”
(Rioux, 2010, p. 13).
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A Nascent Social Justice Approach. Journal
of Education for Library & Information Science, 51, 9-17.
IS Social Justice Theoretical Assumptions
Assumption #4
“Theory and research are pursued with the ultimate
goal of bringing positive change to service
constituencies” (Rioux, 2010, p. 13).
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A Nascent Social Justice Approach. Journal
of Education for Library & Information Science, 51, 9-17.
IS Social Justice Theoretical Assumptions
Assumption #5
“The provision of information
an inherently powerful activity”
(Rioux, 2010, p. 13).
services is
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A Nascent Social Justice Approach. Journal
of Education for Library & Information Science, 51, 9-17.
Social Justice Collaboratorium
Vision & Mission
The Social Justice
Collaboratorium is a userdriven online research and
pedagogical tool for LIS
educators, practitioners, and
supporters that is committed
to the discovery and
implementation of best
practices that link knowledge
to action, and which promote
information as tool for
community empowerment.
User Driven
Information
Tool
Best
Practices
Research
Pedagogy
Community
Content
LaVerne Gray
University of Tennessee-Knoxville
SJC Content
The SJC hopes to bring together
resources and information by
supplying a space where interested
students, professionals, and LIS
educators can connect on social
justice relevant matters in libraries and
communities that they serve.
Resources
SJC
LIS
Community
SJC Content - Collaboration
Sharing ideas, building community by collating disparate
resources from LIS education, research, teaching,
professional activities, and community work.
Image From: http://www.community-mapper.com/#1000-1422216651447
SJC - Proposed Content
Education
Materials
Research
Best
Practices
Community
Space
Resources
SJC-Content - Educational Materials
• Syllabi
• Pedagogical Activities
• Service Learning Projects &
Opportunities
Image From: http://www.ricbookstore.org/
SJC Content - Research
•
•
•
•
•
Current & Past Research
Publication Opportunities
Calls for Papers
Presentations/Panels
Grants
SJC Content - Community Building
Dr. Margaret Burroughs Faces of My People
Image From: http://blog.usa.gov/post/3057877300/this-woodcut-by-margaret-burroughs-is-called-the
SJC Content - Best Practices
• Community Engagement
• Collections
• Information Instruction
• Professional Development
SJC Content - Resources
Brainstorming ~ Feedback ~ Discussion
Functional Specifications
Myrna Morales
University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
Process
• Requirements Analysis to determine functional elements
• User expectations from user surveys
• Iteration process:
• Wireframing
• User feedback
• Development
• User feedback
Initial Requirements
• Resource sharing
• Document upload (including text, images, video & audio)
• Communication capabilities for contributors
• Comments, forum
• Community moderator
• Community upvoting on favorite content, best practice
models
• Social media integration
Sustainability
• Hosting
• Internal vs. 3rd party
• Security
• Spam, hackers
• Ownership
• Protection of user- submitted content
• Data portability (should we need to take down the site)
• Website builder
• Full turnkey platform vs. build our own
• Cost, control, maintenance, support
Initial Wireframes - Homepage
https://cacoo.com/diagrams/gK31gLlJnY7a08Xo#A13ED
Initial Wireframes - Homepage
https://cacoo.com/diagrams/gK31gLlJnY7a08Xo#A13ED
Initial Wireframes - Homepage
https://cacoo.com/diagrams/gK31gLlJnY7a08Xo#A13ED
Initial Wireframes - Homepage
https://cacoo.com/diagrams/gK31gLlJnY7a08Xo#A13ED
Additional Considerations
•
•
•
•
•
•
User registration
Responsive, mobile design
Site search
Analytics
Tagging
Languages
Marketing + Outreach
Elnora Kelly Tayag
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Place
Price
Product
Marketing Strategy
People
Promotion
Process
Targeted Users
Students / Novice
• Consume
information
•
Students/ Faculty/
Faculty
Organizations
Share + Disseminate: • Collaborate, Connect, +
syllabi, research,
Co-create: events,
exhibits, panels, papers
assignments,
lesson plans
• Advocacy
♦ Low level participation ♦ Moderate level participation ♦ High level participation
User Needs Assessment




Pre-assessment
Build
Prototype
Re-assess
Visit us + sign up at
https://socialjusticecollaboratorium.wordpress.com/
Promotion
 Referrals
 Social Media
 List-serves
 Conferences
 Interaction
@SJCollaborate
#SocialJusticeCollab
Place
Price
Product
Marketing Strategy
People
Promotion
Process
Environmental Scan
Model 1
Syllabus
org
Syllabus
org
Syllabus
org
internet
Syllabus
org
Syllabus
org
org
Environmental Scan
Model 2
Long List of Links
Blog / Website
Curated by…
SJC Model
Collaborate + Create
Social Justice
Collaboratorium
Students
Faculty
Organizations
Let’s Build It Together
Social Justice
Collaboratorium
PLACE
PRODUCT
PEOPLE
PROCESS
PROMOTE
PRICE
Visit us at
https://socialjusticecollaboratorium.wordpress.com/
@SJCollaborate
[email protected]
Additional Readings
Jaeger, P. T., Gorham, U., Taylor, N. G., Kettnich, K., Sarin, L. C., & Peterson, K. J. (2014). Library research and what
libraries actually do now: education, inclusion, social services, public spaces, digital literacy, social justice, human
rights, and other community needs. Library Quarterly, 84(4), 491-493.
Jaggars, D. (2014). We can imagine the future, but are we equipped to create it? Portal: Libraries & The Academy, 14(3),
319-323.
Schroeder, R., & Hollister, C. V. (2014). Librarians’ views on critical theories and critical practices. Behavioral & Social
Sciences Librarian, 33(2), 91-119.
Traska, M. R. (2014). Extremism @ the Library. American Libraries, 45(6), 32-35.
Adler, K. (2013). Radical Purpose: The Critical Reference Dialogue At a Progressive Urban College. Urban Library
Journal, 19(1), 1-8.
Duff, W., Flinn, A., Suurtamm, K., & Wallace, D. d. (2013). Social justice impact of archives: a preliminary
investigation. Archival Science, 13(4), 317-348.
Gomez, H. (2013). Seeking social justice in a library career. Voice Of Youth Advocates, 36(2), 22-23.
Additional Readings
Greene, M. A. (2013). A critique of social justice as an archival imperative: What is it we're doing that's all that
important?.American Archivist, 76(2), 302-334.
Jimerson, R. C. (2013). Archivists and social responsibility: A response to Mark Greene. American Archivist, 76(2), 335345.
Levitov, D. D. (2013). Libraries, poetry, and social justice. School Library Monthly, 29(7), 4.
Rioux, K. (2013). Teaching social justice in an information literacy course: An action research case study. Catholic
Library World, 83(3), 191-195.
Shorter-Gooden, K. (2013). The Culturally Competent Organization. Library Quarterly, 83(3), 207-211.
Hudson, D. (2012). Unpacking "Information Inequality": Toward a critical discourse of global justice in library and
information science. Canadian Journal Of Information & Library Sciences, 36(3/4), 69-87.
Additional Readings
Lor, P. J., & Britz, J. (2012). An ethical perspective on political-economic issues in the long-term preservation of
digital heritage.Journal Of The American Society For Information Science & Technology, 63(11), 2153-2164.
Longstaff, R. (2011). Social justice across the curriculum: Librarians as campus leaders. Catholic Library World, 81(4),
285-289.
Bonnici, L. , Maatta, S. , Wells, M. , Brodsky, J. , & Meadows, I. (2012). Physiological access as a social justice type in
LIS curricula. Journal Of Education For Library & Information Science, 53(2), 115-129.
Vender, A. (2011). Shhh! no opinions in the library. Newsletter On Intellectual Freedom, 60(5), 171-199.
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A nascent social justice approach. Journal Of
Education For Library & Information Science, 51(1), 9-17.
Rioux, K. (2010). Metatheory in Library and Information Science: A nascent social justice approach. Journal Of
Education For Library & Information Science, 51(1), 9-17.
Abilock, D. (2006). So close and so small: Six promising approaches to civic education, equity, and social
justice. Knowledge Quest, 34(5), 9-16.
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