No change - Neshaminy School District

advertisement
th
9
Grade AE Honors
English
Final Exam Review
Mrs. May
Final Exam
• 90 multiple choice questions:
– 5 Reading Selections:
• 2 works of nonfiction
– Historical speech
– essay
• 3 works of fiction
– 1 short story
– 2 poems
– Figurative Language
– Grammar, Usage, Mechanics
– Vocabulary In Context
Figurative Language
•
•
•
•
•
•
Hyperbole
Imagery
Metaphor
Onomatopoeia
Personification
Simile
Hyperbole:an exaggerated
statement that is not meant to be taken
literally; it is used to create a specific
reaction.
“Atticus, the world is
coming to an end…”
To Kill A Mockingbird
By Harper Lee
Imagery:
visually descriptive
language; usually appeals to one or more
of the five senses.
“The cry was pinched
off short as the
blood-warm waters
of the Caribbean
Sea closed over his
head.”
From Richard Connell
The Most Dangerous Game
Metaphor: draws a comparison
between two unalike things; WITHOUT using the
words “like” or “as”.
“My lips, two blushing pilgrims, ready stand
To smooth that rough touch with a tender kiss.”
Romeo, Act I, sc. v
“Thou know'st the mask of night is on my face,
Else would a maiden blush bepaint my cheek.”
Juliet, Act II, sc. ii.
The Tragedy of Romeo & Juliet
William Shakespeare
Onomatopoeia:
“Zing”-- Joey sent a
pebble into the
blooms.
From Marigolds
By Eugenia Collier
imitates or suggests
the source of the
sound that it
describes.
Personification:
gives animals, inanimate objects
or abstractions human qualities,
traits or abilities.
“Maycomb was a tired old
town, even in 1932 when I
first knew it.”
“From the day Mr Radley
took Arthur home people said
the house died."
To Kill A Mockingbird
Harper Lee
Simile:
Compares two unalike things using the words
“like” or “as”.
“She is small and
sprightly, like a
bantam hen.”
A Christmas Memory
By Truman Capote
Grammar, Usage, Mechanics
20 Questions
You will read two short
passages with/without
embedded “errors”.
The “errors” will be
underlined throughout
the text.
Each set of revisions will
include the option:
NO CHANGE.
G.U.M EXAMPLE
When Erin Gruwell first stepped through the doors of Room 203 at Woodrow
Wilson High School in Long Beach, California, she had no idea how her experiences
their would change the course of her life. Fresh out of college, Erin was eager to make a
1
2
difference in her student’s live’s.
3
Choose the letter that indicates the best revision of the underlined word or words.
Selection “A” indicates no change needed.
1.
2.
3.
A. No change
A. No change
A. No change
B. they’re
B. college, Erin
B. students’ lives
C. they are
C. college, Erin
C. student’s lives
D. there
D. college; Erin
D. students’ lives’
G.U.M EXAMPLE
When Erin Gruwell first stepped through the doors of Room 203 at Woodrow
Wilson High School in Long Beach, California, she had no idea how her experiences
their would change the course of her life. Fresh out of college, Erin was eager to make a
1
2
difference in her student’s live’s.
3
Choose the letter that indicates the best revision of the underlined word or words.
Selection “A” indicates no change needed.
1.
2.
3.
A. No change
A. No change
A. No change
B. they’re
B. College, Erin
B. students’ lives
C. they are
C. college: Erin
C. student’s lives
D. there
D. college; Erin
D. students’ lives’
TYPES OF G.U.M. QUESTIONS
• Comma usage
– Use a comma to separate items in a series (3 or more things)
– Alfonso grabbed his keys, pocketed his wallet, and found his
missing shoe just in time to catch the bus.
– Use a comma and a conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so)
to connect two independent clauses.
– He thought he had everything he needed for the day, but he left his
math homework sitting on the kitchen counter.
– Use a comma to set off introductory elements
– While sitting on the bus, he asked to borrow Ollie’s book and
quickly opened it to page 454.
– Use a comma to set off an appositive (noun phrase)
– The assignment, which Alfonso had thought would take a minute,
was over eighty questions.
TYPES OF G.U.M. QUESTIONS
• Comma usage
– Use a comma to separate items in a series (3 or more things)
– Alfonso grabbed his keys, pocketed his wallet, and found his
missing shoe just in time to catch the bus.
– Use a comma and a conjunction (and, but, for, nor, yet, or, so)
to connect two independent clauses.
– He thought he had everything he needed for the day, but he left his
math homework sitting on the kitchen counter.
– Use a comma to set off introductory elements
– While sitting on the bus, he asked to borrow Ollie’s book and
quickly opened it to page 454.
– Use a comma to set off an appositive (noun phrase)
– The assignment, which Alfonso had thought would take a minute,
was over eighty questions.
Commonly Misused Words
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
a lot
your/you’re
their/there/they’re
new/knew
no/know
it’s/its
too/to/two
a/an
weather/whether
There is no such word as “A LOT”; a lot of people forget that.
There is a word “allot” which means to assign an amount or
share; example:
“You should allot twenty minutes for traffic when considering
what time to leave.”
If you like something a great deal… you like it a lot.
Put A LOT of space between the two words “a” and the “l”.
your
Y-O-U-R is a possessive pronoun.
Your final will
have 90
questions.
you’re
Y-O-U-’-R-E is a contraction for two
words: “you” and “are.
You’re going to
do well on the
final.
Their
Is a possessive, plural,
pronoun.
Their family
will be arriving
tomorrow.
There
Is an adverb that indicates the
manner in which something is
done; it answers the question
“where”.
Put their
suitcases there.
They’re
Is a contraction for two words:the
pronoun they and the verb are.
They’re going to
have enjoy their
family while there.
knew
new
Is a verb
Is an adjective
Jillian knew that
she would need a
new car.
Jillian knew that
she would need a
new car.
know
no
Is a verb
Can be used as many parts of speech, but
is most often used as an adjective.
I know that there is I know that there is
no reason to doubt no reason to doubt
my friend.
my friend.
its
It’s
Is a possessive pronoun;
Is an contraction for the two words
“it” and “is”
There is no apostrophe
for the possessive for of
it.
It’s time for the dog to bury
its bone.
It’s can only mean IT IS
It’s time for the dog to bury
its bone.
Too
Is an adverb; it can
mean excessive or in
addition to.
Give these books
to the two girls
who are going
too.
Two
Is a noun when used as a
number.
To
Is a preposition used for
expressing destination or direction.
Is an adjective when used to
describe a noun.
Give these books to
the two girls who are
going too.
Give these books to
the two girls who are
going too.
a and an (both words are articles)
“a” goes before all words beginning with consonants, EXCEPT before an unsounded “H”
a cat, a dog, a popsicle, a beat, a notebook, a hat, a hotel
an historic even, an honest error
“an” goes before all words that begin with vowels, EXCEPT when “u” makes the same sound
as the “y” in you, or “o” makes the same sound as “w” in won
An apricot, an elephant, an Indian, an orbit, an uprising, an uneventful day
a unit, a used napkin, a U.S. soldier, a one-act play, a unicorn
weather
whether
Is a noun
Is a conjunction; used to introduce
alternatives.
The wedding was scheduled
to start at noon whether or
not the weather was
cooperating.
The wedding was scheduled
to start at noon whether or
not the weather was
cooperating.
Always Capitalize:
•
the pronoun “I”
•
Proper nouns, specifc persons, places, things, ideas (Democracy)
•
the first letter of the first word of each sentence
•
The first letter of adjectives that are made from the names of people and places. Example: I like
Brazilian food.
•
Initials. Example: J.D. Salinger is one of my favorite authors.
•
The first letter of directions only when they are used to designate actual places, NOT when they
point in a direction. Examples:
1.
When we visited the Southwest, we actually had to drive north.
2.
I haven’t ever been to the West Coast. The west coast of Australia is beautiful.
VOCABULARY
IN CONTEXT
1. Acquiescence
11. Iota
2. Affable
12. Lacerated
3. Ambidextrous
13. Phantom
4. Amenities
14. Scruples
5. Auspicious
15. Sojourn
6. Benevolence
16. Solicitously
7. Complacently
17. Tangible
8. Deplorable
18. Vehement
9. Imperative
19. Volition
10. Imprudent
20. Zealous
VOCABULARY
IN CONTEXT
acquiescence
consent; acceptance
affable
friendly
ambidextrous
ability to use both hands
interchangeably
amenities
conveniences,
auspicious
momentous, impressive
VOCABULARY
IN CONTEXT
benevolence
charity
complacently
smugly, contentedly,
confidently, satisfactorily
deplorable
terrible
imperative
mandatory
imprudent
unwise
VOCABULARY
IN CONTEXT
iota
small, or tiny amount
lacerated
wounded, cut, torn
phantom
specter, apparition,
ghost, haunt, spook
scruples
morals, principles,
personal code of conduct
sojourn
short stay or trip
VOCABULARY
IN CONTEXT
solicitously
with concern and caution
tangible
vehement
able to be touched, held
or felt
full of emotion, adamant
volition
choice, accord
zealous
accomplished, skilled,
Literature Terms
Conflict
Internal
External
Types of Conflict
Man
vs.
Man
Man
vs.
Self
Man
vs.
Society
Man
vs.
Nature
Man
vs.
Fate/God
Point of View
First Person: the story is being told
by one of the characters in it; uses
the pronouns I, me, my.
When he was nearly thirteen,
my brother Jem got his arm badly
borken at the elbow.
Maycomb was a tired old town,
even in 1932 when I first knew it.
Point of View
Third Person Limited: the story is
told from one character’s point of
view, BUT, we know the thoughts
and feeling only of that character;
uses “he said” and “she said”.
Point of View
Third Person Omniscient: We know
the thoughts and feelings of ALL the
characters; God-like, or all-knowing
presence.
Download
Related flashcards

Grammar

21 cards

Punctuation

15 cards

Markup languages

43 cards

Parts of speech

13 cards

Linguistic morphology

14 cards

Create Flashcards