Weeks 7, 8 and 9 Journalism

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Journalism 1
WEEKS 7, 8 AND 9
Bell work #15a
 A comma splice occurs when two
independent clauses are joined with only a
comma
 Incorrect: I enjoyed my time as a Boy Scout, I
learned many skills.
 Reminder:
 Label Bell work #15
 Write the statement and correct
 7-minute writing
Bell work #15b
 A comma splice occurs when two
independent clauses are joined with only a
comma
 Correct: I enjoyed my time as a Boy Scout, and I
learned many skills.
 Correct: I enjoyed my time as a Boy Scout; I
learned many skills
 Correct: I enjoyed my time as a Boy Scout. I
learned many skills.
Bell work #16

Active voice presents the subject of the sentence as the doer of the action of
the verb. Passive voice presents the subject of the sentence as the receiver of
the action of the verb. Active voice is preferred as being less wordy and more
direct.

Active Voice: The school board expelled 17 students last night for their part in vandalizing
the science lab last March.

Passive Voice: Seventeen students were expelled last night by the school board for their
part in vandalizing the science lab last March.
Active Voice: Prom committee members decorated the gymnasium.
 Passive Voice: The gymnasium was decorated by prom committee members.


Note: Passive voice is preferred when the receiver of the action is more important than
the doer of the action, or when the doer of the action is unknown.

Passive Voice: Senior Steve Johnson was arrested last night and charged with embezzling
funds from the student government,

Passive Voice: More than $2,500 in damage was done by vandals who broke into the
science lab during the weekend.
Bell work #17a
 Pronoun-antecedent agreement problems
occur when the pronoun is plural but the
antecedent is singular. Pronouns must agree
in both number and gender.
 Incorrect: The First Lutheran Church will hold their
annual chili supper Friday evening.
 Incorrect: Each reporter must submit their story by
deadline.
 Incorrect: The team won their last three games.
 Reminder:


Write the Statement and examples
7-minute writing
Bell work #17b
 Pronoun-antecedent agreement problems occur when the pronoun is
plural but the antecedent is singular. Pronouns must agree in both
number and gender.
 Correct: The First Lutheran Church will hold
its annual chili supper Friday evening.
 Correct: Members of the First Lutheran
Church will hold its annual chili supper Friday
evening.
 Correct but wordy: Each reporter must submit
his or her story by deadline
 Correct: The team won its last three games.
Bell work #18

Subject-verb agreement problems occur for a variety of reasons. The most frequent
problems occur when using collective nouns, such as team, committee, council, faculty,
and board. Collective nouns take a singular verb when used to mean a single group acting
together or in agreement.


Collective nouns take a plural verb when used to refer to group members acting as individuals or in
disagreement. Writers avoid the problem by adding the word members.




Example: Much of the news today is bad news.
Example: Economics is a fascinating subject.
Other plural words, although referring to a single item, take a plural verb.



Correct: The faculty were split in their reactions to the vote,
Better: The faculty members were split in their reactions to the vote.
Note: Some words are plural in spelling but singular in meaning. These take a singular verb.


Example: The committee is unhappy with the results of the vote.
Example: Those new jeans are distinctive
Example: Scissors were used to cut the screen
Reminder:


Write the Statement and examples
7-minute writing
Bell work #19
Word Choice Issues
 More than or over?

More than refers to a number, over refers to a position.


Incorrect: Over 30 students volunteered to clean the stadium.
Correct: More than 30 students volunteered to clean the stadium.
 Because of or due to?

Because of modifies a verb. Due to modifies a noun and usually follows
a form of the verb “to be”.


Examples: He failed to get into college because of a poor grade point average.
His failure to get into college was due to a poor grade point average.
 Allot of a lot?

Allot is a verb, A lot is used as an adjective to mean “many.”


Examples: The committee voted to allot $100 for prizes.
A lot of students auditioned for roles in the musical.
 Its or it’s?

Its is an irregular possessive. It’s is a contraction of it is.


Examples: Referring tot eh first-place ranking the coach said, “My players know its true
worth.”
Players say it’s a long bus ride to most away games.
Bell work #20
Directions: Write example sentences to demonstrate proper use of
each.









accept and except
allowed and aloud
further and farther
have and of
loose and lose
passed and past
their, there, and they’re
through and threw
that, which, and who
 TIME to SUBMIT Bell work to assignment bin
 Reminder:


Label Bell work #20
10-minute writing
Chapter 5: Interviewing
 Read Chapter 5 page 88-
105
 Write Vocabulary on page
88
 Lecture PowerPoint
Chapter 5

Taking Notes PowerPoint
 Chapter 5 Handout Review
 Analyzing an Interview
Handout
 The Zen of Interviewing
 Open-Ended and ClosedEnded Questions
 Interview someone you
know


“Find Someone Who”
handout
Interview a Classmate
 In-class Story
Assignment

Beginner's In-Class Story
Assignment
 Chapter 5 Test
The Zen of Interviewing

For many beginning journalists, the prospect of telephoning or dropping in
on a perfect stranger to ask probing questions is pretty frightening.

It goes against the grain of much of what we’ve been told growing up: Don’t talk to strangers. Mind
your own business. Don’t ask rude questions.
Our obligations as journalists trump those old standbys from the parents’ handbook.
 Even without all that parental advice kicking around in your subconscious,
your first few interviews can be pretty intimidating.


You have to call up or visit perfect strangers, often in positions of authority.
You are doing something unfamiliar, the learning curve is pretty steep, and there’s no
margin for error.
 But if you think it’s a gut-tightener for you, think about the person you will
be interviewing, particularly if he or she isn’t used to dealing with news
media.


Your subject goes into the interview knowing that anything he or she says might wind up in the
newspaper or on the air for all to see.
Or that a brand-new reporter will not get it right.
 An interview doesn’t have to be a contest to see who wins.


In fact, if we are to serve our audiences well, that’s probably not the appropriate model.
Open-Ended and Closed-Ended Questions
 Use open-ended questions when a subject won’t open up:
 Tell me about your son.
 Talk about that for a minute.
 Describe what you did at that point.
 Use closed-ended questions when a subject won’t shut up,
or is being vague or evasive:




Did you take the money?
What was her name?
How many hikers are missing?
When did he graduate?
From Anderson, D., and Itule, B., Writing the News, Ch. 7. New
York: Random House. 1988.
Feature Writing
Chapter 10: Feature Article
 Read Chapter 10 page 228-247
 Write Vocabulary on page 229
 Lecture PowerPoint Chapter 10
 Chapter 10 Handout Review
 Personality Profile PowerPoint

Personality Profile Article
 Behind the Scenes Feature


Behind the Scenes Feature Article
Example of BSF Article
 Chapter 10 Test
Reference Section
 Schaffer, James, Randall McCutcheon and Kathryn
T. Stofer. Journalism Matters. Lincolnwood:
Contemporary, 2001.
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