EDUC 1 Syllabus

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PAMANTASAN NG LUNGSOD NG VALENZUELA
COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
Department of Professional Education
COURSE SYLLABUS
PLV Vision-Mission
Institutional Outcomes
College Vision, Mission, Goals,
and Core Values
Vision
A center of excellence for teacher education
Mission
The College is committed to prepare outstanding educators who will inspire the lives of individuals in the complex global society through quality and
relevant education empowered by significant researches and strong linkages and extension programs.
Objectives
1. Provide programs based upon sound pedagogical practice
2. Undertake activities that will enhance instruction to develop students’ critical, reflective and creative thinking skills
3. Provide a variety of teaching venues incorporating the latest technologies to a range of diverse student interests and backgrounds
4. Provide avenues for the improvement of teaching and learning through research, scholarship and technology
5. Establish collaborative, professional relationships with organizations and institutions to deliver quality service
6. Make contributions on the frontiers of knowledge through distinctive research agendas
7. Involve in community partnerships, service learning and volunteerism
Core Values
Program Outcomes
The College is committed to Integrity, Service, and Excellence.
Teacher education graduates of the Professional Education program will be able to:
1. Articulate the rootedness of education in philosophical, sociocultural, historical, psychological, and political contexts
1
Course Title
Course Code
Credit Units
Course Pre-requisite
Course Description
Course Outcomes
2. Demonstrate pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) in the intra/inter/multidisciplinal nature of the subject matter
3. Facilitate learning using a wide range of teaching methodologies and delivery modes appropriate to specific learners and their environments
4. Develop innovative curricula, instructional plans, teaching approaches, and resources for diverse learners
5. Apply skills in the development and utilization of ICT to promote quality, relevant, and sustainable educational practices
6. Demonstrate a variety of thinking skills in planning, monitoring, assessing, and reporting learning processes and outcomes
7. Practice professional and ethical teaching standards sensitive to the local, national, and global realities
8. Pursue lifelong learning for personal and professional growth through varied experiential and field-based opportunities
The Child and Adolescent Learners and Learning Principles
EDUC 1
3 units of lecture
None
A research-based course on the biological, linguistic, cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions of development among children and
adolescents with focus on the factors affecting learning and their pedagogical implications for teaching
Upon successful completion of this course, the students will be able to:
1. Examine in three different perspectives namely developmental contextualism, sociocultural perspective, and evolutionary theory how children and
adolescents develop across their life spans
2. Contextualize the biological, linguistic, cognitive, social, and emotional dimensions of development among children and adolescents to make
learning responsive to their (children and adolescents) needs, preferences, and interests
3. Explain how the PPST-based domains on learning environment and learner diversity contribute to the amalgamation of a teacher’s content
knowledge and pedagogy
4. Write and present a mixed-research (quan-qual) paper on the developmental dimensions among children and adolescents with focus on the factors
affecting learning and their pedagogical implications for teaching
Alignment of Course Outcomes with Summative Assessment Tasks
Course Outcomes
Summative Assessment Tasks
Details
1. Examine in three different perspectives namely
1. Written outputs (specific to the needs of students)
All written outputs, oral presentations, and midterm/final Position papers (individual)
developmental contextualism, sociocultural perspective,
term exams are graded requirements and are used mainly in

Case
reports
(pair)
and evolutionary theory how children and adolescents
the computation of the final grades, i.e., the combined
 Quan-qual paper (group with 4 members midterm and final-term grades.
develop across their life spans
only)
2. Contextualize the biological, linguistic, cognitive, social,
2. Oral presentations (group with 4 members only)
and emotional dimensions of development among
2
children and adolescents to make learning responsive to
their (children and adolescents) needs, preferences, and
interests
3. Explain how the PPST-based domains on learning
environment and learner diversity contribute to the
amalgamation of a teacher’s content knowledge and
pedagogy
4. Write and present a mixed-research (quan-qual) paper on
the developmental dimensions among children and
adolescents with focus on the factors affecting learning
and their pedagogical implications for teaching
 Quan-qual paper
3. Midterm/final-term exams
Position papers (individual) are graded using the assessment
criteria of:
1. Conciseness
2. Clarity
3. Context
4. Positionality
Case reports (pair) are graded using the assessment criteria
of:
1. Conciseness
2. Clarity
3. Implications for teaching and learning
Proposal papers (group of 4 members for the midterm
period) are graded using the assessment criteria of:
1. Significance of the problematique
2. Depth and breadth of the related literatures and
studies
3. Pragmatic integration of the theoretical and
conceptual frameworks
4. Appropriateness of the research design and
methodology
Final papers with oral presentations (group of 4 members
for the final-term period) are graded using the assessment
criteria of:
1. Significant RPOs
2. Scholarly RRL
3. Analytical integrated theoretical and conceptual
frameworks
4. Rigorous methodology
3
5. Conformity to scholarly writing (appropriate in-text
citations and reference listing)
The format of the final (quan-qual) paper follows the:
1. Introduction
2. Methodology
3. Results and discussion
4. Conclusions and recommendations
Midterm and final-term exams are prepared using a two-way
test blueprint (table of specification) and are administered
on the 9th and 18th week of the semester (subject to the
changes in the academic calendar of the current school
year).
Weeks
Hours
Course Contents
Essential Questions
1st
3 hrs.
Over-all view of
the course
How does one
perform a selfassessment vis-à-vis
independent
language learning
roles and tasks?
How does one
examine critically the
place of quality
outcomes to achieve
desired results in the
course?
Course Learning Plan
Modes of Instructional Delivery
Intended Learning
Flexible
Face-to-Face
Outcomes
Learning
Activities
Activities
Perform a selfExamination of
assessment vis-à-vis
the course
independent language
syllabus
learning roles and tasks
as they participate
willingly in the course
orientation
Examine critically the
place of quality
outcomes (discussion of
the course requirements)
Assessment Tasks
References/TeachingLearning Support Materials
Independent learning
roles
Independent learning
tasks
Quality outcomes
(course requirements)
4
2nd
3 hrs.
The study of
developmental
psychology
How does one
assume responsibility
in educating the
SELF by relating
creatively one’s prior
knowledge and
constructed realities
to his/her personal
and career
backgrounds?
How does one study
the developmental
characteristics
among children and
adolescents within
the realms of the
three perspectives
namely
developmental
contextualism,
sociocultural
perspective, and
evolutionary theory?
How are the key
themes and issues in
developmental
psychology helpful
for a teacher in
understanding
development in the
to achieve desired
results in the course
Assume responsibility in
educating the SELF by
relating creatively one’s
prior knowledge and
constructed realities to
his/her personal and
career backgrounds
Explain how the
developmental
characteristics of
children and adolescents
are contextualized
within the realms of
developmental
contextualism,
sociocultural
perspective, and
evolutionary theory
Lecturediscussion
Situational
analysis
Comparison grid
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi,
C. H. (2012). Child and
adolescent development: an
integrated approach.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
(Read introduction to child
and adolescent
development, pp. 6-23.)
Examine how key
themes and issues in
developmental
psychology assist
teachers in
understanding
development in the life
spans of children and
adolescents
5
3rd
4th
5th
6 hrs.
3 hrs.
Establishing a
continuum
between the
classical theories
and contemporary
approaches to
development
Model
presentation on
the continuum
between classical
theories and
contemporary
life spans of children
and adolescents?
How are classical
theories and
contemporary
approaches to
development
established through a
continuum to gain a
principled
understanding of
developmental
constructs in the
psychology of
children and
adolescents?
How is the
continuum assistive
of a teacher in the
basic education
curriculum in
planning for,
implementation of,
and evaluation of
learning outcomes?
How does a group of
four students present
a continuum model
between the classical
theories and
contemporary
Examine how a
continuum is established
in the light of the
classical theories and
contemporary
approaches to
development
Situational
analysis and
theory (re)
integration
Personal
learning
environment
(PLE)
Preparation for a
model analysis
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi,
C. H. (2012). Child and
adolescent development:
an integrated approach.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
(Read theories and
contexts of development,
pp. 47-63.)
Examine how the
continuum assists
teachers in the basic
education curriculum in
planning for,
implementation of, and
evaluation of learning
outcomes
Present a continuum
model between the
classical theories and
contemporary
approaches to
development
Model
presentation
Model analysis
Position paper
6
6th
7th
3 hrs.
3 hrs.
approaches to
development
The biopsychology
of children and
adolescents
Language
development
approaches to
development?
How do genes
influence behavior?
How is behavioral
genetics helpful in
understanding
heredity in the
environment of
children and
adolescents?
How do children
acquire their first
and second
languages?
How is second
language learning
explained in the
contexts of learner
characteristics and
learning conditions?
How is second
language learning
explained in the
behaviorist, innatist,
cognitivist, and
sociocultural
perspectives?
Analyze the process of
genetic coding and what
genes can do to
influence behavior
Examine the role of
behavioral genetics to
understand heredity in
the environment of
children and adolescents
Analyze how children
acquire their L1 and L2
given their
characteristics and the
learning conditions in
which language
acquisition takes place
Lecturediscussion
Case analysis
Case report
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi,
C. H. (2012). Child and
adolescent development: an
integrated approach.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
(Read genetics, prenatal
development, and the
neonate, pp. 86-130.)
Situational
analysis
Case analysis
Case report
Lightbown, P.M. & Spada, N.
(2011). How languages are
learned. (3rd ed.). UK: Oxford
University Press. (Read
language learning in early
childhood, pp. 1-26 and
explaining second language
learning, pp. 29-48.)
Examine the various
perspectives in second
language learning
among children and
adolescents
7
8th
9th
10th
3 hrs.
3 hrs.
The development
of thinking as a
process of
problem solving
and memory
Socio-emotional
development:
children and
adolescents as
social beings
How does Piaget
describe the symbolic
child in the cognitive
dimension of
development?
Describe Piaget’s the
symbolic child in
understanding cognitive
development among
children
How is self-directed
thinking developed in
the basic level
processes: executive
function?
Analyze basic level
processes in developing
problem solving and
memory
How do teachers
address emotion,
temperament, and
personality
development among
children and
adolescents from
diverse
backgrounds?
How important is the
family for healthy
socio-emotional
development?
11th
3 hrs.
The child and
adolescent
learners in the
contexts of the
Who are the child
and adolescent
learners in the
contexts of the PPST-
Situational
analysis
Case analysis
Midterm Examination and Submission of Proposal Paper
Examine the ways and
Situational
Case analysis
means teachers address
analysis
emotion, temperament,
and personality
development among
children and adolescents
from diverse
backgrounds
Case report
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi,
C. H. (2012). Child and
adolescent development: an
integrated approach.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
(Read the symbolic child:
Piaget’s theory and
beyond, pp. 230-264 and
becoming self-directed
thinkers: problem solving
and memory, pp. 306-341.)
Case report
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi,
C. H. (2012). Child and
adolescent development: an
integrated approach.
Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
(Read emotion,
temperament, and
personality development,
pp. 438-475 and the family
and other contexts for
socialization, pp. 520-561.)
Explain the importance
of family for healthy
socio-emotional
development
Explain the PPST-based
domains on learning
environment and learner
diversity
Lecturediscussion
Concept
mapping
Comparison grid
The Philippine Professional
Standards for Teachers
Position paper
8
12th
3 hrs.
13th
14th
6 hrs.
PPST-based
domains on
learning
environment and
learner diversity
Learning in the
behaviorist,
cognitivist,
humanist, social
learning, and
constructivist
perspectives
Addressing
learner needs,
preferences
(styles), and
interests in the
classroom
based domains on
learning environment
and learner
diversity?
How is learning
viewed in the
behaviorist,
cognitivist, humanist,
social learning, and
constructivist
perspectives?
Examine the five
different learning
perspectives in relation
with views of the
learning process, locus
of learning, and purpose
of education
Lecturediscussion
How do teachers
address learner
needs, preferences,
and interests in the
classroom?
Analyze how teachers
address learner needs,
preferences, and
interests in the
classroom
Situational
analysis
How does motivation
affect learning in its
many ends?
Examine the role of
motivation in realizing
the many ends of
learning
Position paper
Film viewing of
‘Bad Genius’
Learner profile
Film review
Ashworth, F., Brennan, G.,
Egan, K., Hamilton, R., &
Saenz, O. (2004). “Learning
Theories in Higher
Education,” Level 3: Vol. 2:
Iss. 1, Article 4. doi:
10.21427/D7S43V. Available
at:
https://arrow.dit.ie/level3/vol2
/iss1/4
Pritchard, A. (2017). Ways of
learning: learning theories
and learning styles in the
classroom. (2nd ed.). London
and New York: Routledge.
(Read learning styles, pp. 4156 and brain-based learning
and other new understanding,
pp. 86-102.)
Seifert, K. & Sutton, R.
(2009). Educational
psychology. (2nd ed.). Zurich,
Switzerland: Jacobs
Foundation. (Read student
motivation, pp. 109-137.)
15th
Research Break
9
16th
17th
18th
Quan-Qual Paper Presentations
Final-Term Examination
Course References
Basic References
Bjorklund, D. F. & Blasi, C. H. (2012). Child and adolescent development: an integrated approach. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.
Other References
Pritchard, A. (2017). Ways of learning: learning theories and learning styles in the classroom. (2nd ed.). London and New York: Routledge.
Ashworth, F., Brennan, G., Egan, K., Hamilton, R., & Saenz, O. (2004). “Learning Theories in Higher Education,” Level 3: Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 4.
doi: 10.21427/D7S43V. Available at: https://arrow.dit.ie/level3/vol2/iss1/4
Lightbown, P.M. & Spada, N. (2011). How languages are learned. (3rd ed.). UK: Oxford University Press.
Mowrer, R. R. & Klein, S. B. (Eds.). (2001). Handbook of contemporary learning theories. New Jersey: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Publishers.
Seifert, K. & Sutton, R. (2009). Educational psychology. (2nd ed.). Zurich, Switzerland: Jacobs Foundation.
Requirements and Grading System
Policies (As agreed by the class)
The Philippine Professional Standards for Teachers
Course Requirements and Policies
Position papers 20%
Case reports 20%
Proposal/final paper (quan-qual) 30%
Midterm/final-term examinations 30%
1. Class starts after the 15-minute grace period. You are all expected to be in your seats as your attendance shall be checked strictly.
2. Tardiness of three sessions is equivalent to a 3-hour absence in the course. As much as possible, exhibit interest and enthusiasm
in attending your sessions so you can make the most out of your time. Incurring more than three absences shall mean automatic
withdrawal from the course.
3. The first 1 and 1/2 hours (inclusive of the grace period) of the session is dedicated to lecture-discussions and group circles in
unpacking a needs-based approach to course facilitation. The remaining 1 and 1/2 hours is designed for the assessment tasks.
Activities are negotiable (the minimum requirement given the course outcomes has still to be met) depending on what is more
appropriate as deemed important by everyone.
10
4. Flexible learning activities shall also be provided where you can accomplish coursework online/offline. You shall be directed to
useful links to optimize learning in the different modalities.
5. Plagiarism shall in way be tolerated in the course. When essentially needed, you all have to give credit to where it is due in
scholarly writing.
6. More than the compliance of requirements, you are all enjoined to share your feedbacks so we can improve the facilitation of
the course. Hence, everything we do as teachers is a work in progress.
Consultation Period
7. Others as agreed upon by the class
By appointment
Prepared by:
Approved:
Christian Amiel E. Narciso
Faculty
Reference Code: To be accomplished by the Office of Curriculum Audit and Internal
Evaluation
Christian Amiel E. Narciso
Chairperson
Dr. Yolanda G. Gadon
Dean
Revision: To be accomplished by the Office of Curriculum Audit and Internal Evaluation
11
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