Introduction to Supervisory/Management Skills

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Bringing Your “A” Game:
Authentic Leadership in
Project Management
Michael R. Van Dyke, PMP
SERENGETI ENTERPRISES, Inc.
(703) 850-1951 * (540) 554-4533
[email protected]
Serengeti Enterprises, Inc.
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Training
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Teambuilding Activities
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Customized in-house
Northern Virginia Community College
(NOVA)
Meetings, events, brainstorming
Coaching for teams and individuals
Authenticity
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Being who we are
Recognizing who we are
Acknowledging we are all different
Looking at the context from which we
came
Leveraging our strengths within a group
3 Factors within 3 Cultures
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Factors
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Brain style
Gender
Communication preferences
Developed within cultural contexts
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Country of Origin
Generation
Work experience (Business culture)
Brain Style
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Genetic, Hardwired Window on the
World
Personality as measured by:
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Myers-Briggs
DiSC
Colors System
Gender and Leadership
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Traditional view
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Feminist view
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Management Theory development
Men lead the “right” way
Focus on what women do “better”
Androgynous
Towards Gender Intelligence
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Leverage strengths
Men and Women are Different
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Brain scans world-wide reveal subtle
differences
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Structure
Blood Flow/Electrical activity
Chemical make-up
Genetically predisposed to certain tasks
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Equivalent to being right or left-handed
Males Tend to:
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Focus on hierarchy and systems
Relate through ritualized action
Downplay emotion
Promote individual risk taking
Sacrifice individual thinking and feeling
in deference to authority
Develop self-worth through challenge
Females Tend to:
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Emphasize complex, multitasking
activities
Bond through extended conversation
Use emotion and relationship building
Promote team consensus
Develop self-worth through
encouragement
Leverage
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Use strengths like other SME skill sets
Examples:
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Mixed gender negotiation teams
Male PM chose female advisor
Female PM selected male mentor
Know other gender skills
Recognize own gender limits
Communication Styles
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Behavior Preference
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Active – Reserved
Direct – Diplomatic
Facts – Emotion/Relationship
Bullet Points – Details
Linked to Brain style
Cultural Contexts
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Country of Origin
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Generation
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Work culture (organizational and team)
“Country” is too Broad
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Region
Rural – suburban – urban
Ethnicity
Hofstede’s Cultural Dimensions
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Power distance
Individualism
Masculinity
Uncertainty Avoidance
Long-term Orientation
Hofstede Graph Examples
China
Finland
USA
from geert-hofstede.com
Venezuela
Generational Culture
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Silent
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Baby Boomers
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born 1945-1960 (39-64 years old)
Gen X
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born before 1945 (64 years old+)
born 1961-1981 (28-38 years old)
Gen Y
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born after 1982 (16-27 years old)
Generational Characteristics
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Silent
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Baby Boomers
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optimistic, competitive, personal accomplishment,
hard-working
Gen X
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disciplined, self-sacrificing, loyal
independent, adaptable, desire immediate &
ongoing feedback, multicultural
Gen Y
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self-confident, group-oriented, good with
technology, multi-taskers, work-life balance
Organizational Culture
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Set by nominal leader or industry
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Obvious differences
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Example: military versus civilian
or overlap
Commercial
Government
Non-profit
Work experience brought by team
members
So What?
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Spend time reflecting on who you are
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Observe project team members
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Note advantages, drawbacks, assumptions
Commonalities, differences, friction
Brainstorm, Plan, & Communicate
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Strategies for effective teamwork with you
as the leader
Contact Information
Michael R. Van Dyke
SERENGETI ENTERPRISES, Inc.
(703) 850-1951 * (540) 554-4533
[email protected]
www.SerengetiEnterprises.net
Leadership and Team Tips blog:
http://teambuilderybu.wordpress.com
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