pho 403 - conceptual photography - nau.edu

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UCC/UGC/ECCC
Proposal for New Course
Please attach proposed Syllabus in approved university format.
1. Course subject and number: PHO 403
2. Units:
See upper and lower division undergraduate course definitions.
3. College:
Social and Behavioral Sciences
4. Academic Unit:
3
Photography
5. Student Learning Outcomes of the new course. (Resources & Examples for Developing Course Learning
Outcomes)
• To apply visual theories to the perception and consumption of photographic imagery in culture.
• To evaluate and interpret photographic images.
• To gain insight into the process of strategic conceptualization of photographic imagery.
• To construct, communicate and sell messages through photography.
• To craft images with intent to produce a strategic emotional response of the viewer.
• To critically explore the visual world you live within.
6. Justification for new course, including how the course contributes to degree program outcomes,
or other university requirements / student learning outcomes. (Resources, Examples & Tools for Developing
Effective Program Student Learning Outcomes).
As part of the new Studio Photography emphasis, this course aims to provide the students with
further theory and experience in crafting images with strategic conceptual ideas.
7. Effective BEGINNING of what term and year?
See effective dates calendar.
Fall 2015
8. Long course title: Conceptual Photography
(max 100 characters including spaces)
9. Short course title: Conceptual Photography
(max. 30 characters including spaces)
10. Catalog course description (max. 60 words, excluding requisites):
Photography aimed at illustrating an idea and producing a strategic emotional response of the viewer,
using lighting systems and image manipulation. Digital-SLR with dedicated flash required. Letter
grade only. Course fee required.
Pre-requisites: PHO 100, 101, 200, 300
Units: 3
Effective Fall 2012
11. Will this course be part of any plan (major, minor or certificate) or sub plan (emphasis)?
Yes
If yes, include the appropriate plan proposal.
No
12. Does this course duplicate content of existing courses?
Yes
No
If yes, list the courses with duplicate material. If the duplication is greater than 20%, explain why
NAU should establish this course.
13. Will this course impact any other academic unit’s enrollment or plan(s)?
Yes
No
If yes, describe the impact. If applicable, include evidence of notification to and/or response from
each impacted academic unit
14. Grading option:
Letter grade
Pass/Fail
Both
15. Co-convened with:
14a. UGC approval date*:
(For example: ESE 450 and ESE 550) See co-convening policy.
*Must be approved by UGC before UCC submission, and both course syllabi must be presented.
16. Cross-listed with:
(For example: ES 450 and DIS 450) See cross listing policy.
Please submit a single cross-listed syllabus that will be used for all cross-listed courses.
17. May course be repeated for additional units?
16a. If yes, maximum units allowed?
16b. If yes, may course be repeated for additional units in the same term?
Yes
No
Yes
No
PHO 100, PHO 101, PHO 200, PHO
18. Prerequisites:
300
If prerequisites, include the rationale for the prerequisites.
The students will need to complete the entry-level photography courses The History of Photography,
Introduction to Photography, Intermediate Photography, and Advanced Photography as to gain the
level of understanding necessary to begin photographing and crafting conceptual images using postprocessing, theory, and and lighting systems which build upon knowledge from those courses.
19. Co requisites:
If co requisites, include the rationale for the co requisites.
.
20. Does this course include combined lecture and lab components?
Yes
No
If yes, include the units specific to each component in the course description above.
Harun Mehmedinovic, Amy Horn,
21. Names of the current faculty qualified to teach this course: Sam Minkler
22. Classes scheduled before the regular term begins and/or after the regular term ends may require
Effective Fall 2012
additional action. Review “see description” and “see impacts” for “Classes Starting/Ending
Outside Regular Term” under the heading “Forms”
http://nau.edu/Registrar/Faculty-Resources/Schedule-of-Classes-Maintenance/.
Do you anticipate this course will be scheduled outside the regular term?
Yes
No
23. Is this course being proposed for Liberal Studies designation?
If yes, include a Liberal Studies proposal and syllabus with this proposal.
Yes
No
24. Is this course being proposed for Diversity designation?
If yes, include a Diversity proposal and syllabus with this proposal.
Yes
Answer 22-23 for UCC/ECCC only:
FLAGSTAFF MOUNTAIN CAMPUS
Scott Galland
Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate
11/6/2014
Date
Approvals:
Department Chair/Unit Head (if appropriate)
Date
Chair of college curriculum committee
Date
Dean of college
Date
For Committee use only:
UCC/UGC Approval
Date
Approved as submitted:
Yes
No
Approved as modified:
Yes
No
Effective Fall 2012
No
EXTENDED CAMPUSES
Reviewed by Curriculum Process Associate
Date
Approvals:
Academic Unit Head
Date
Division Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized Learning)
Date
Division Administrator in Extended Campuses (Yuma, Yavapai, or Personalized
Learning)
Date
Faculty Chair of Extended Campuses Curriculum Committee (Yuma, Yavapai, or
Personalized Learning)
Date
Chief Academic Officer; Extended Campuses (or Designee)
Date
Approved as submitted:
Yes
No
Approved as modified:
Yes
No
Effective Fall 2012
PHO 403 - CONCEPTUAL PHOTOGRAPHY
COURSE DESCRIPTION
Photography aimed at illustrating an idea and producing a strategic emotional response of the viewer, using lighting systems and
image manipulation. Digital-SLR with dedicated flash required.
Prerequisites:
PHO 101, PHO 100, PHO 200, and PHO 300
COURSE STRUCTURE
This class will be conducted in a twice-weekly format, utilizing one weekly meeting as lecture, discussion, and the other weekly
meeting as lab where I and partner participation can help create Idea into Concept, Concept into Construction, and Construction
into Message. Beneficial for Photography, PhotoJournalism, Public Relations, and Advertising Emphasis.
The class will be broken into four sections, each section requiring two strategically crafted images and one reaction paper
discussing, critiquing, and extending known visual theory.
Students will be required to demonstrate cumulative understanding of visual theory, its application to Photography, and
Photography’s extension into the commercial and consumer-driven marketplace. Beyond the 8 images and 4 Reaction Papers, each
set of partners will need to work together on a Final Project that embodies the idea of Conceptual, creating either a Marketing,
Political, or Advertising Campaign in 3-5 Storyboarded images. This will need to either embrace ideas and ideologies of the
current market, or critique them.
REQUIRED MATERIALS
Equipment:
1. DSLR Camera with Manual Capability.
2. Memory Card.
3. Internet Access.
4. Tripod
Textbooks:
Reading Photographs: Introduction to Theory & Meaning of Images, Richard Salkeld
Advertising Photography, Lou Lesko
Between The Eyes: Essays On Photography & Politics, David Strauss
Photography, 11th Ed, Barbara London, Jim Stone, John Upton
In Addition: Flickr.com account for photography assignment submission and group critique. This is free of charge and only
requires and Yahoo.com email account for activation.
STUDENT LEARNING EXPECTATIONS/OUTCOMES FOR THIS COURSE
• To apply visual theories to the perception and consumption of photographic imagery in culture.
• To evaluate and interpret photographic images.
• To gain insight into the process of strategic conceptualization of photographic imagery.
• To construct, communicate and sell messages through photography.
• To craft images with intent to produce a strategic emotional response of the viewer.
• To critically explore the visual world you live within.
Effective Fall 2012
COURSE OUTLINE & SCHEDULE
NOTE: THESE DATES ARE TENTATIVE AND ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE FOR REASONS OF SICKNESS,
SNOW DAY, ETC. PLEASE PAY ATTENTION TO NAU.EDU EMAIL ACCOUNTS AND TO BLACKBOARD
LEARN FOR UPDATES.
NOTE2: ALL PAPERS WILL BE SUBMITTED IN HARD-COPY PRINT FORM AT THE END OF CLASS. NO
EXCEPTIONS WITHOUT INSTITUTIONAL EXCUSE WILL BE PERMITTED.
Week 1 | TBA : Course Introduction
- Syllabus
- Expectations
- Assignments
- Intro to Visual Theory
Week 2 | TBA: Visual Theory
(Typically A - Meaning
holiday) - Message
READINGS DUE: Online Reading (TBD)
Salkeld – Reading Photography
PHOTO DUE: Interpretation (1 image)
Thursday LAB
Week 3 | TBA: Visual Theory
- Representation
- Reality
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Lesko – Advertising Photography
PHOTO DUE: Construction (1 image)
Thursday LAB
Week 4 | TBA: Visual Theory
- Concepts as Cultural
- Ideas Into Idealogies
Thursday LAB
Week 5 | TBA: Ideas To Concepts
- How to construct a message
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Strauss – Essays On Photography/Politics
PAPER DUE: Concepts as Cultural, Ideas Into
Idealogies
READINGS DUE: Online Reading (TBD)
Salkeld – Reading Photography
Thursday LAB
Week 6 | TBA: Ideas To Concepts
- How to read an audience
Thursday LAB
Week 7 | TBA: Ideas To Concepts
- How to sell message to audience
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Strauss – Essays On Photography/Politics
PHOTO DUE: Message (1 image)
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Lesko – Advertising Photography
PHOTO DUE: Mass Appeal (1 image)
Thursday LAB
Week 8 | TBA: Ideas To Concepts
- Examples of various visual campaigns
throughout history/Discussion
Thursday LAB
Week 9 | TBA: Concepts To Constructions
- Crafting your Emotivational Response
Effective Fall 2012
READINGS DUE: Online Reading (TBD)
Photography – Chap 12, Seeing Images
PAPER DUE: Critique of visual campaign, use of theory
in construction, discussion of
results/effects/impact
READINGS DUE: Online Reading (TBD)
Salkeld – Reading Photography
-
Psychology of identity, mass culture,
and intended response
Thursday LAB
Week 10 | TBA: Concepts To Constructions
- Branding
- Examples of successful brandings
- Examples of failed brandings
Thursday LAB
Week 11 | TBA: Concepts To Constructions
- Marketing
- Controlled Conceptualization
- Discussion
Thursday LAB
Week 12 | TBA: Concepts To Constructions
- Advertising
- Who’s Buying & Why
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Lesko – Advertising Photography
PHOTO DUE: Emotion-Inducing (1 image)
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Strauss – Essays On Photography/Politics
PHOTO DUE: Motivation-Inducing (1 image)
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Lesko – Advertising Photography
PAPER DUE: Why Campaigns Succeed or Fail
Thursday LAB
Week 13 | TBA: Messages & Agendas
- Examples of Strategic Imagery
- Meaning & Significance
- Influence & Behavior
Thursday LAB
Week 14 | TBA: Messages & Agendas
- Truth/Shaped Truth
- Lies Of Omission/Construction
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Lesko – Advertising Photography
PHOTO DUE: Strategic Communication
READINGS DUE: Salkeld – Reading Photography
Strauss – Essays On Photography/Politics
PHOTO DUE: Strategic Miscommunication
Thursday LAB
Week 15 | TBA: Messages & Agendas
Tuesday – Final Portfolio/Discussion
Thursday – Selling Ideas/Discussion
Finals | TBA: Final Project Discussion
DUE: Final Portfolio (Tuesday)
PAPER DUE: Differences of Politicizing,
Propagandizing, & Promotions
EXAM #1: Visual Theory Basics
Note: Participation in class discussion, activities, and tutorials are factored into grading. Any unexcused absence, therefore,
costs you both attendance points and participation points.
Effective Fall 2012
Grading Scale:
A=500-450, B=449-400, C=399-350, D=349-300, F=299 and below
Reaction Papers
Sectional Photography Assignments
Examination
Final Group Project
Flickr.com Comment Groups
Discussion
Lab Participation
TOTAL
(4 @ 25)
(8 @ 20)
(75 Images, 25 Strategy)
(8 @ 5)
100 points
160 points
50 points
100 points
40 points
25 points
25 points
500 points
Extra Credit Opportunities available near end of the semester (1 @ 10 = 10 points).
ASSESSMENT
Students will be assessed based on their understanding of the technologies and concepts covered in class & how that understanding
is reflected in their creative work. Final grade will largely reflect the quality and sincerity of students' effort in this class.
Attendance & Participation – Students are expected to attend every lecture. Attendance will be taken at the beginning of each
class. Each unexcused absence will cost the student 10 points. In case of personal emergencies or sickness, please contact the
instructor prior to class to receive an excused absence & provide a written notice from the doctor.
Reaction Papers – Students must complete a sectional reaction paper on one of the weekly readings from either Salkeld, Lesko
or Strauss. Students will have their prerogative of the roughly 5-10 sectional options to choose from. Each paper must be
minimum 500 words but no more than 1000 words, and must follow proper APA guidelines. The paper must either exemplify
or challenge the published essay, posing strategic reactions in word form to demonstrate understanding and/or significance.
Photographic Assignments – Students must complete two sectional photographic assignments as part of their demonstration of
understanding and application of course subject matter. Students will have a week to prepare at the beginning of each section,
and then must plan, conceptualize, and construct an image that represents that specific assignment. Students will be able to
partner up for labs, and for many, labs can be utilized to pursue these assignments, specifically in the studio.
Examinations – Students will take one final examination in which the visual theories, process steps, and application scenarios
are quizzed through a cumulative True/False, Multiple Choice, and Matching examination.
Note: More detailed rubric for each project will be given prior to due date.
NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY
POLICY STATEMENTS FOR COURSE SYLLABI
SAFE ENVIRONMENT POLICY
NAU’s Safe Working and Learning Environment Policy prohibits sexual harassment and assault, and discrimination and harassment
on the basis of sex, race, color, age, national origin, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, disability, or veteran status by anyone
at this university. Retaliation of any kind as a result of making a complaint under the policy or participating in an investigation is also
prohibited. The Director of the Office of Affirmative Action & Equal Opportunity (AA/EO) serves as the university’s compliance
officer for affirmative action, civil rights, and Title IX, and is the ADA/504 Coordinator. AA/EO also assists with religious
accommodations. You may obtain a copy of this policy from the college dean’s office or from the NAU’s Affirmative Action website
nau.edu/diversity/. If you have questions or concerns about this policy, it is important that you contact the departmental chair, dean’s
office, the Office of Student Life (928-523-5181), or NAU’s Office of Affirmative Action (928) 523-3312 (voice), (928) 523-9977
(fax), (928) 523-1006 (TTD) or [email protected]
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES
If you have a documented disability, you can arrange for accommodations by contacting Disability Resources (DR) at 523-8773
(voice) or 523-6906 (TTY), [email protected] (e-mail) or 928-523-8747 (fax). Students needing academic accommodations are required to
register with DR and provide required disability related documentation. Although you may request an accommodation at any time, in
order for DR to best meet your individual needs, you are urged to register and submit necessary documentation (www.nau.edu/dr) 8
Effective Fall 2012
weeks prior to the time you wish to receive accommodations. DR is strongly committed to the needs of student with disabilities and
the promotion of Universal Design. Concerns or questions related to the accessibility of programs and facilities at NAU may be
brought to the attention of DR or the Office of Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity (523-3312).
ACADEMIC CONTACT HOUR POLICY
Based on the Arizona Board of Regents Academic Contact Hour Policy (ABOR Handbook, 2-224), for every unit of credit, a student
should expect, on average, to do a minimum of three hours of work per week, including but not limited to class time, preparation,
homework, studying.
ACADEMIC INTEGRITY
Integrity is expected of every member of the NAU community in all academic undertakings. Integrity entails a firm adherence to a set
of values, and the values most essential to an academic community are grounded in honesty with respect to all intellectual efforts of
oneself and others. Academic integrity is expected not only in formal coursework situations, but in all University relationships and
interactions connected to the educational process, including the use of University resources. An NAU student’s submission of work is
an implicit declaration that the work is the student’s own. All outside assistance should be acknowledged, and the student’s academic
contribution truthfully reported at all times. In addition, NAU students have a right to expect academic integrity from each of their
peers.
Individual students and faculty members are responsible for identifying potential violations of the university’s academic integrity
policy. Instances of potential violations are adjudicated using the process found in the university Academic Integrity Policy.
RESEARCH INTEGRITY
The Responsible Conduct of Research policy is intended to ensure that NAU personnel including NAU students engaged in research
are adequately trained in the basic principles of ethics in research. Additionally, this policy assists NAU in meeting the RCR training
and compliance requirements of the National Science Foundation (NSF)-The America COMPETES Act (Creating Opportunities to
Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education and Science); 42 U.S.C 18620-1, Section 7009, and the National
Institutes of Health (NIH) policy on the instruction of the RCR (NOT-OD-10-019; “Update on the Requirement for Instruction in the
Responsible Conduct of Research”). For more information on the policy and the training activities required for personnel and students
conducting research, at NAU, visit: http://nau.edu/Research/Compliance/Research-Integrity/
SENSITIVE COURSE MATERIALS
University education aims to expand student understanding and awareness. Thus, it necessarily involves engagement with a wide
range of information, ideas, and creative representations. In the course of college studies, students can expect to encounter—and
critically appraise—materials that may differ from and perhaps challenge familiar understandings, ideas, and beliefs. Students are
encouraged to discuss these matters with faculty.
CLASSROOM DISRUPTION POLICY
Membership in the academic community places a special obligation on all participants to preserve an atmosphere conducive to a safe
and positive learning environment. Part of that obligation implies the responsibility of each member of the NAU community to
maintain an environment in which the behavior of any individual is not disruptive. Instructors have the authority and the responsibility
to manage their classes in accordance with University regulations. Instructors have the right and obligation to confront disruptive
behavior thereby promoting and enforcing standards of behavior necessary for maintaining an atmosphere conducive to teaching and
learning. Instructors are responsible for establishing, communicating, and enforcing reasonable expectations and rules of classroom
behavior. These expectations are to be communicated to students in the syllabus and in class discussions and activities at the outset of
the course. Each student is responsible for behaving in a manner that supports a positive learning environment and that does not
interrupt nor disrupt the delivery of education by instructors or receipt of education by students, within or outside a class. The
complete classroom disruption policy is in Appendices of NAU’s Student Handbook.
Effective Summer 2014
Approved UCC – 1/28/14
APPROVED UGC – 2/12/14
Effective Fall 2012
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