MATHC142SLOVACEK_F11 - Home

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Class Syllabus
Cerro Coso Community College
Department of Mathematics
FALL 2011
Math C142 - CRN# 70335
ONLINE
Trigonometry
Instructor:
Email
Address:
Office:
Joe Slovacek
Phone(s):
(760) 924-1603 (Mammoth Lakes)
[email protected]
Eastern Sierra College Center Bishop 104 & Mammoth 225C
(760) 872-5318 (Bishop)
Class interaction is to be primarily conducted on the Course Compass
COMMUNICATION - DISCUSSION BOARDS or by e-mail (private
communications only - please!). It is vital that topic dialogue occur on the
discussion board so that all students in the class can benefit. It is equally
important that ALL students routinely visit the discussion board to view
announcements, posts and replies (these posts are required reading!).
Office Hours:
Responses to student posts usually occur within 24 hours with the exception of
weekends & holidays; this is standard and consistent within our mathematics
department. Response times are typically much better than 24 hours but
unexpected events do come up so please be patient and please use the class
discussion boards for classroom and subject matter material; please use email for issues that require privacy.
Please note that students are required to read all posts and replies on the class
discussion boards. These boards serve as our virtual classroom; not reading
posts and replies is analogous to not attending class in a live class so please
read them - my suggestion is to try to follow the same policy as above and
check them every 24 hours except on weekends and holidays. All class
announcements as well as subject matter questions and replies will be on these
boards. Thank you in advance for checking the discussion boards on a regular
basis.
E-MAIL:
***** EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! ***** If you try to contact me via e-mail,
put the characters "MC142" exactly as shown (without the quotation marks) in
your subject line to avoid having your e-mail REJECTED by spam filters!
“Trigonometry has always been the black sheep of mathematics. Too advanced to be part of
“elementary math,” yet too elementary for the higher branches of the profession, it has been looked
upon as a glorified form of geometry, complicated by tedious computation. Nothing could be
further from the truth. Uniquely positioned as a meeting point between pure and applied
mathematics, its rich history shows how different branches of science — among them geography,
astronomy, physics, and even music — have influenced one another.”[1]
Webster’s defines trigonometry as the study of the properties of triangles and trigonometric
functions and of their applications. A trigonometric function is defined as a function (as the sine,
cosine, tangent, cotangent, secant, or cosecant) of an arc or angle most simply expressed in terms of
the ratios of pairs of sides of a right-angled triangle.[2] “It is of immense practical value in such
fields as engineering, architecture, surveying, navigation, and astronomy. The subject is divided
into plane trigonometry (concerned with plane triangles) and spherical trigonometry (concerned
with spherical triangles). Trigonometric functions also play a role in analysis and are used to
represent waves and other periodic phenomena.”[3]
Trigonometry is an intensive study of trigonometric functions of real numbers and angles, their
graphs and properties; functions of multiple angles, identities, reduction formulas, radian measure,
inverse functions, solutions of triangles, polar graphing, complex numbers and De Moivres’
theorem. One of the major objectives of this course is to help you make the transition from
elementary mathematics to calculus. In addition to preparation for the study of calculus, you will
gain improved arithmetic and problem-solving skills, exposure to mathematical literature and a
general appreciation to the mathematical way of thinking.
[1] Eli MAOR (1998), Trigonometric Delights. Princeton University Press, Princeton, New Jersey.
[2] Webster’s New Collegiate Dictionary, 1981, “Trigonometry,” 1240.
[3] John Daintith & R.D. Nelson, eds. (1989), The Penguin Dictionary of Mathematics. Penguin Books Ltd, 326.
Please read the following information carefully!
Mathematics Classes & Study Time!
*** Math classes move quickly and cover a lot of material during the semester. A universally accepted
rule-of-thumb for any college course is two hours per week of study time for every hour spent in class;
some recommend three to four hours per week of study time for every hour in class. So ... for a regular
16-week semester mathematics class, you would spend 4 hours per week in class with an additional
8 hours per week of study time - this equals a minimum of 12 hours per week total class/study time;
"your mileage may vary" and you should plan on spending between 12 and 20 hours a week in
order to pass this course! This amount of time assumes that you have had the prerequisite course
(Math C055 - Intermediate Algebra) recently (within one year) and that you have good command
(grade A or B) of the prerequisite material; you should plan on spending extra time and getting a
tutor ASAP if this is not the case!
As an FYI, here is a short article from the November 30, 2009 National Education Association
(NEA) Morning Update Newsletter:
Algebra II Test Given Nationwide Shows That Only 15 Percent Of Students Ready For
College.
The Baltimore Sun (11/29, Bowie) reported that "Fifteen states, including Maryland, joined
together in 2005 to take part in the American Diploma Project, an effort to raise academic standards
and graduation requirements for high schools around the country." For the project, an "algebra II
test was given to 100,000 students across the nation, including 1,295 in Maryland." Test results
"showed that nationwide, 15 percent are prepared for their first college course." Sandy Boyd, "a
vice president at Achieve, a national organization that created the Diploma Project," said that even
though "the results could be seen as discouraging, the test was hard to pass."
FYI - Time Management
Some Study Tips On Time Management (Source: Bittenger, et. al. 2008. PREALGEBRA, pg.65):
* Juggling Time
Working 40 hours per week and taking 12 credit hours is equivalent to working two full-time jobs.
Can you handle such a load? Your ratio of number of work hours to number of credit hours should
be about 40/3, 30/6, 20/9, 10/12, or 5/14.
* A Rule Of Thumb On Study Time
Budget about 2-3 hours for homework and study for every hour you spend in class each week.
* Scheduling Your Time
Make an hour-by-hour schedule of your typical week. Include work, school, home, sleep, study,
and leisure times. Try to schedule time for study when you are most alert. Choosing a setting that
will enable you to focus and concentrate. Plan for success and it will happen!
The above is based on a 16-week semester-length class.
Please put in the necessary time to successfully pass this course and please do not underestimate the
time that you will need to put into this class!
How To Be Successful! - this is also
***** EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! *****
First - you absolutely need to put in the time (please see above)! I wish I could perform the "Spock
mind-meld" and transfer the information into your brain, but I simply don't have that ability. The
best I can do is to guide you and try to explain material when you get stuck. Now, what to do?
1. Read the text, several times, very carefully and make sure that you understand rather than merely
memorize for the short term.
2. Make sure you understand what all the words mean - it is impossible to learn mathematics
without understanding the words, terminology, theorems and properties used to communicate
mathematics - this is true for any subject in any discipline. I highly recommend buying a MATH
DICTIONARY (YES - many do exist!). In addition, the Course Compass website contains many
useful web links in the content areas.
3. Make sure that you thoroughly understand the example problems and that you can do them
without looking at the book. You have little hope of understanding and successfully doing the
homework if you don't understand the example problems.
4. Do the homework in your textbook for additional practice; a good rule-of-thumb is to do every
other odd problem. This is a suggestion and not a requirement; only the online HW is required. The
majority of your time in this course should be spent with your textbook and in doing homework
problems online (required) and from the text (optional). Let me reiterate - you should be WRITING
(yes, that means pen/pencil and paper) your work/answers to the problems/questions as well as the
definitions to the terms, theorems and properties.
5. ***** EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! ***** You should view the online homework as quizzes to
help you prepare for the exams. The online sample exams are also there to help you prepare for the
exams; NOTE: sample exam scores are NOT factored into your grade! *****
6. ***** EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! ***** Pay careful attention to using the correct form and
syntax when doing your online homework and online exams. For example, if the problem asks for
an answer to the tenths decimal place and you enter your answer to the hundredths decimal place,
the computer will mark it wrong even though the answer may be numerically correct. The online
homework, which is not worth as much toward your overall grade, will help you get used to
answering questions in the correct format so that you'll get the correct answers on the online exams,
which do count the most toward your overall grade. NOTE: If you make a mistake on your exam
and the software marks it incorrect, you are out of luck, so ... PLEASE BE CAREFUL to answer the
question that is being asked and also in the correct format! To exemplify this point, if you fill out
your tax return incorrectly, the IRS will contact you and you may have to pay a penalty - so
again, PLEASE BE CAREFUL. You will have ample opportunity to practice with the assigned
homework and the optional sample exams (the sample exams have no direct affect on your grade
and do not factor into your overall score). I would very strongly suggest that everyone do the
tutorial "How to Enter Answers Using the Math XL Player" located in the announcement tab at left.
7. In this course, you will have one exam approximately every two weeks that will cover a chapter
in the text. So ... there will be six (6) online exams in this course. Each exam will count up to 10
points toward your final grade and each will cover one chapter in the text. Chapter 6 Exam will
cover chapter 6, Chapter 7 Exam will cover chapter 7, and so on; these exams will not be
cumulative except to the extent that material in the early chapters is often necessary to understand
the material in later chapters.
8. ***** EXTREMELY IMPORTANT! ***** If you find that you are not doing well in the course,
i.e., not passing the exams, it is a student responsibility to take steps to remedy the situation.
PLEASE communicate with your instructor (me) so that you can be provided with suggestions for
improvement. I very highly, strongly, recommend that you try to form a regular study group with
other students in your area - the process of studying with others can really help a lot. Finally, if you
do need extra help, please contact your local and/or online counselor to help you find and arrange
for a tutor to help you. Please do this immediately if you do not pass ANY of the chapter exams.
Finally, if the material still does not seem to "click" after you have done all of the above, it
probably means that your background in mathematics is very weak and I very strongly suggest that
you go back and retake the prerequisite mathematics course - no matter what letter grade you
received! It is well documented that grade inflation exists and a good grade does not necessarily
mean that you have a good understanding of prerequisite material. The goal is, and always should
be, to learn the material. Your future professional success will depend on your knowledge, skills,
and abilities and not on the grades you receive in your college classes; very few people, if anyone,
will ever look at your grades once you enter the professional world. Your goal, as a student, should
be to learn the material as best as you possibly can rather than "going for a particular grade" or
simply "passing the class." I should note that if you learn the material well you will almost certainly
get a good grade in the course, so please make studying a priority! :-)
FAQ - What if I don't do well on an exam? Is there any extra credit?
No, there are no extra credit options! Please do well
on all the exams!
However ... I will drop the lowest (1) exam score and the lowest three (3) HW scores from your
overall grade.
Note: You will NOT see this adjustment in your CourseCompass gradebook; I make those
adjustments in my Excel spreadsheet at the end of the course. Therefore ... the grade that appears in
your Course Compass gradebook "MAY" be lower than the grade you will receive for the course; it
depends on how close you are to the next higher grade. In any event, your final course grade will never be
lower than what appears in your Course Compass gradebook.
Mathematics courses often require more study time than many other courses - that's just the way it
is. The best way to pass this course is to study - a lot! :-)
FAQ - Why do the due dates in Course Compass differ from the dates outlined in the Course
Schedule?
The due dates in Course Compass are absolute due dates - homework and exams must be completed
by these dates. The due dates in the week-to-week Course Schedule are "suggested" due dates; the
Course Schedule is a suggested guideline to help you be successful in the course and avoid
procrastination. You are welcome to follow any schedule that suits you, however, assignments and
exams must be completed by the absolute due date (last day of the course) as listed on the Course
Compass website and in this syllabus below.
A VERY VERY IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT DEADLINES !!!!!
There is only one absolute deadline for ALL assignments (HW & Exams) for this course Thursday, December 8, 2011, 11:59 P.M. PST.
The other deadlines are highly recommended, strongly advised, meet them or you will probably be
toast, etc., deadlines. This gives students the most flexibility to complete assignments and finish the
course.
However, ... please do not use the above generosity as an excuse to procrastinate. Procrastination
and not spending enough time on the course are the primary reasons why students do not
successfully complete mathematics courses (remember the toast part above!).
So ... please try to adhere (like super glue) to the recommended schedule so that you may
successfully complete the course. :-)
ANOTHER EXTREMELY IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT DEADLINES !!!!!
For the purposes of successful academic progress reports, alerts & warnings, and incomplete grades, the
RECOMMENDED course schedule will be followed for periodic grade assessments.
FAQ - What are "Early Alerts?"
The Early Alert system is an automated system that instructors use, at the request of College
Administration and Counseling, to alert students in academic trouble so there is some time to remedy the
situation. It is a course management tool to help increase student success. Please do not take it personally
if you receive one; it is just a tool. Again, note that the recommended course schedule will be followed
when sending early alerts.
FAQ - I haven't done any work for 15 weeks; can I get an incomplete in the 16th week so that I can
complete the course?
Answer: NO!
College Administration has instructed faculty to NOT use the incomplete grade as a "bailout
mechanism" for failing students.
Two criteria must be met to for faculty to be allowed to award an incomplete grade:
1. The student must be in some dire circumstance such as a medical emergency.
2. The student must be passing the class at the time of granting the request for an incomplete grade.
For criteria #2, the recommended course schedule will be used to determine if a student is passing the
class at the time! Also, criteria #2 is most often the reason that an incomplete request is denied.
Required Text
Precalculus 9/e




Sullivan, Michael
Textbook ISBN-10: 0321716833
Textbook ISBN-13: 9780321716835
Publisher: Prentice Hall
CourseCompass Course ID: slovacek62091
ADDITIONAL IMPORTANT INFORMATION!
** CourseCompass is supported by MS Windows; the most recent version of MS Windows is
recommended. CourseCompass may be supported by Mac operating systems; some Mac users have had
either poor CourseCompass performance or have experienced incompatibility issues and some have had
excellent success - your mileage may vary.
** CourseCompass works best with the latest versions of MS Internet Explorer web browser; I
personally use Firefox with excellent success - your mileage may vary.
** Cerro Coso recommends that you take it's online mathematics classes only if you have high-speed
internet access; dial-up is painfully slow and Cerro Coso recommends not taking an online mathematics
class if you only have dial-up modem internet access.
** Cerro Coso is not responsible for CourseCompass's performance on your personal computer, no
matter which operating system, web browser, or internet access method you use.
TEXTBOOK & ACCESS CODE PURCHASING OPTIONS!
** Option 1:
Buy the text and Course Access Code packaged together from a vendor of your choice.
Precalculus 9/e



Sullivan, Michael
Textbook ISBN-10: 0321716833
Textbook ISBN-13: 9780321716835

Publisher: Prentice Hall
***** Please note that publishers often change ISBN numbers for different printings, packages, etc., so
please confirm with your vendor before purchasing. Thanks! *****
** Option 2:
Buy only the Course Access Code by following this link:
http://www.coursecompass.com/website/student_register.html
The text is available online as an e-book on the web site.
Remember that the CourseID is slovacek62091
CourseCompass Technical Support
For any technical assistance please call the CourseCompass Technical Support staff at:
1 (800)
677-6337.
***** IMPORTANT NOTE *****
As required by college administration, you will be dropped from this
class if you are not registered on CourseCompass by the end of Week
1 of the semester - Monday, August 29, 2011, 11:59 P.M. PST (Pacific
Standard Time). Thank you for making this a priority!
Calculator Policy
Use of graphing calculators is allowed on all exams; you will need to use technology in this course!
I strongly recommend that you purchase a tutorial book for your calculator; this is different from
what came with your calculator which was a reference manual.
You will find this course very frustrating if you are having difficulties using your calculator.
You may use any graphing calculator that you wish, however, it is ABSOLUTELY ESSENTIAL that
you become familiar with and are able to use your calculator; the textbook shows examples
(Appendix B) using a TI-83/84+. There are so many different manufacturers and models out there
that we simply can't spend a lot of time learning the technology; you should already be somewhat
proficient in using a graphing calculator from previous mathematics courses. I would STRONGLY
RECOMMEND that you purchase a tutorial textbook for your specific graphing calculator; these are
available online and/or from the manufacturers website. You are free to use whatever calculator
you choose (e.g., you can use an abacus and a slide rule) BUT, you must be proficient in using that
technology. If you are not proficient please plan on spending a lot of extra time to become
proficient with your chosen technology.
I do RECOMMEND that you do a few simple problems "by hand" in each section so that you have a
good understanding of the concepts; please do not become DEPENDENT on your calculator - it is
meant to be a tool rather than a crutch.
Course Objectives
A. Develop self-learning skills in mathematics, aka, intellectual independence.
B. Develop the ability to read and understand mathematics books.
C. Communicate mathematical ideas through writing, discussions and presentations.
D. Basic literacy and numeracy in the areas of arithmetic and algebra.
E. Interrelate the multiple definitions of the trigonometric functions and their inverses.
F. Determine the appropriate trigonometric ratio or law to apply to solve problems with triangles.
G. Use the radian measure effectively in conversions and it applying formulas to solve problems.
H. Analyze trigonometric functions and their graphs using the concepts of amplitude, period, phase
and vertical shifts and apply these ideas to real problems.
I. Recognize and verify or prove trigonometric identities.
J. Analyze trigonometric equations to determine what combination of algebra and identities will
lead to a solution.
K. Apply trigonometry to operations with complex numbers.
L. Solve problems and graph equations of conic sections in rectangular and polar coordinate systems
in two and three dimensions.
M. Identify and solve problems using parametric equations and vectors in the plane and in space.
N. Apply multiple approaches to problem solving, using algebraic, graphical, and numerical methods
to solve applied problems in other areas of mathematics, natural sciences, computer graphics, and
computer animation.
O. Demonstrate problem-solving skills requiring a combination of techniques.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES AND ASSESSMENTS
Upon successful completion of the course, the student will be able to:
A. Interrelate the multiple definitions of the trigonometric functions and their inverses. This outcome
will be assessed and scored by exam.
B. Determine the appropriate trigonometric ratio or law to apply to solve problems with
triangles. This outcome will be assessed and scored by exam.
C. Use the radian measure effectively in conversions and it applying formulas to solve
problems. This outcome will be assessed and scored by exam.
D. Analyze trigonometric functions and their graphs using the concepts of amplitude, period, phase
and vertical shifts and apply these ideas to real problems. This outcome will be assessed and
scored by exam.
E. Recognize and verify or prove trigonometric identities. This outcome will be assessed and scored
by exam.
F. Analyze trigonometric equations to determine what combination of algebra and identities will lead
to a solution. This outcome will be assessed and scored by exam.
G. Apply trigonometry to operations with complex numbers. This outcome will be assessed and
scored by exam.
H. Solve problems and graph equations of conic sections in rectangular and polar coordinate systems
in two and three dimensions. This outcome will be assessed and scored by exam.
I. Identify and solve problems using parametric equations and vectors in the plane and in space. This
outcome will be assessed and scored by exam.
Course Outline
Weeks 1 & 2 - Chapter 6: Trigonometric Functions
Weeks 3 & 4 - Chapter 7: Analytic Trigonometry
Weeks 5 - 8 - Chapter 8: Applications of Trigonometric Functions
Weeks 8 - 11 - Chapter 9: Polar Coordinates; Vectors
Weeks 11 - 13 - Chapter 10: Analytic Geometry
Weeks 14 - 16 - Chapter 14: A Preview of Calculus: The Limit, Derivative, and Integral of a Function
Homework
This is a homework intensive course!
This course covers thirty-seven (37) sections
of the text, and homework will be assigned for each of these sections. Homework assignment point
values vary, based on the number of problems contained in each assignment. There are a maximum
of 40 adjusted homework points possible. All 37 homework assignments are required and are to be
considered assigned work. These are not timed assignments, but they have due dates. Once the due
date elapses for a particular assignment, the student will no longer be able to work on it. Please see
the Homework section for a list of due dates. You may redo homework assignments to improve your
scores or simply to get more practice as often as you like up to the absolute due date!
PREREQUISITE NOTE: Please note that all (except one) assignments have a prerequisite of completing
the previous section with a score greater than or equal to 70% before you are allowed to do the next HW
section. For example, you need to complete HW Section "Chapter 0" with a score of 70% or greater
before you are allowed to do HW Section 6.1, you need to complete HW section 6.1 with a score of 70%
or greater before you are allowed to do section 6.2 and so on; this will be a chapter-by-chapter
prerequisite requirement. This policy is there to help students be successful in our math courses; please
do not procrastinate in doing your homework assignments. *****Also note that this is a Cerro Coso
Community College Mathematics Department Policy and is consistent with ALL Mathematics courses
taught by ALL instructors in Mathematics at Cerro Coso Community College.*****
HOMEWORK
All of the necessary plug-ins (MathXL) will have to be installed on your computer.
All due dates have "due times" of 8:59 P.M. Pacific Standard Time (PST)!
ABSOLUTE DEADLINE FOR ALL WORK - THURSDAY, December 8, 2011 by 11:59 P.M. PST
Homework Recommended Deadline
6.1 - 6.6
7.1 - 7.7
8.1 - 8.5
9.1 - 9.7
10.2 - 10.7
14.1 - 14.5
No later than September 6.
No later than September 26.
No later than October 11.
No later than October 31.
No later than November 16.
No later than December 5.
Homework Availability ("Window")
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
FAQ - Can I work ahead?
Yes! ALL homework, sample exams, and graded exams are available beginning August 22.
Exams
There will be six exams (chapters 6-10 & 14). Each exam is worth up to 10 points. None of the
exams will be cumulative except to the extent that you need to know and understand the material
from earlier chapters in order to know and understand the later chapters.
All of the necessary plug-ins (MathXL) will have to be installed on the testing computer. I strongly
recommend that you test your computer with a sample exam to make sure everything is working
correctly BEFORE you take your first graded exam!
All due dates have "due times" of 11:59 P.M. Pacific Standard Time (PST)!
ABSOLUTE DEADLINE FOR ALL WORK - THURSDAY, December 8, 2011 by 11:59 P.M. PST
Exam Recommended Deadline
Exam 6
Exam 7
Exam 8
Exam 9
Exam 10
Exam 14
No later than September 6.
No later than September 26.
No later than October 11.
No later than October 31.
No later than November 16.
No later than December 5.
Exam Availability ("Window")
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
August 22 - December 8
EXAM INSTRUCTIONS
Calculators ARE allowed! Closed book, BUT, you may use one 8 1/2" X 11" double-sided formula sheet
AND one 8 1/2" X 11" double-sided sheet of notes. No additional notes are allowed. It is a timed (180
minutes), computer controlled, online exam.
IMPORTANT NOTE: Prior to taking an exam, please log off, shut down, restart your computer and
reconnect to the internet. This will make it less likely that your computer will "freeze" up. IF your
computer "freezes" up, please turn your computer off immediately, restart, reconnect to the internet,
and log back into CourseCompass to continue your exam. Note that the clock keeps ticking so please do
this as quickly as you can so that you do not lose too much time.
PREREQUISITE NOTE: Please note that all exams have a prerequisite of completing ALL homework
section for that chapter with a score greater than or equal to 70% before you are allowed to do take
either the sample or graded exams. For example, you need to complete ALL the HW Sections for chapter
1 with a score of 70% or greater before you are allowed to take the exams for chapter 1, you need to
complete ALL HW sections for chapter 2 with a score of 70% or greater before you are allowed to take
the exams for chapter 2 and so on. This policy is there to help students be successful in our math courses;
please do not procrastinate in doing your homework assignments or taking your exams. *****Also note
that this is a Cerro Coso Community College Mathematics Department Policy and is consistent with ALL
Mathematics courses taught by ALL instructors in Mathematics at Cerro Coso Community
College.*****
You may notice that homework assignments and exams have recommended
deadlines that are one to two weeks apart: September 6, September 26, October 11,
October 31, November 16 and December 5. This is designed so that you have some
flexibility in completing assignments and tests. However, there is extreme danger
with this scheme as well - procrastination - Don't Procrastinate!
Schedule:
However, ALL work must be completed by THURSDAY, December 8, 2011 by 11:59
P.M. PST. (ABSOLUTE DEADLINE)
***** I cannot give any extensions beyond this deadline (course completion date)! *****
I've given you a lot of flexibility to complete your work but we do need to progress
through the course. It is reasonable and fair so ... please don't procrastinate (at least
not too much)! If you need to be out of town on business or a family vacation is
coming up, please get your work done ahead of time, i.e., before the recommended
deadline . You may not have time for business or a family vacation!
Course Grading
Grading is based on your exam and homework performances. Since the six (6) exams have a total
maximum value of 60 points, the thirty-seven (37) homework assignments have a total maximum
adjusted value of 40 points, the maximum obtainable points for this course are 100.
100 – 90 points = A ; 89.9 – 80 points = B ; 79.9 – 70 points = C ; 69.9 – 60 points = D ; F
≤ 59.9 points
Instructor Availability
I am available online Monday through Thursday. Do not expect a response to your questions on
weekends (Fridays, Saturdays, or Sundays). Note: PLEASE USE THE DISCUSSION BOARDS
EXCLUSIVELY IN THIS COURSE, with the notable exception being anything that requires
private communication - thanks!
Personal Information
It is very important that the college or your instructors be able to contact you when
necessary for such situations as a cancelled class, a change in the time or location of a
class, or an emergency college closing. It is your responsibility to make sure that your
contact information, including telephone numbers, e-mail address and mailing address
are correct. Please verify this information at the beginning of each semester or
whenever you change your e-mail address or telephone number! You can do this
under the Personal Information menu on BanWeb.
EXTREMELY IMPORTANT NOTE: College administration has advised instructors to
exclusively use college assigned e-mail addresses (@cerrocoso.edu on file in BanWeb)
for e-mail communications with students so please keep your e-mail addresses up to
date in the college Banner system as well as in Course Compass. Thank You!
Your e-mail options:
1. Check your emails from your Cerro Coso email account regularly.
2. Change the email setting from your myBanWeb account to an email address that
you
use
regularly.
3. Login your Cerro Coso email account, and forward your Cerro Coso emails to an
email address that you use regularly.
Students with Disabilities
If you have a disability which may require classroom or test accommodations, please
contact Special Services - Disabled Student Program and Services (DSPS) in Room
Main Bldg 312 or call 760-384-6250. You will need to provide written
documentation of your disability. If you think you have a disability but currently have
no documentation, DSPS may be able to help you. All information will be kept
confidential. This document is available in alternate format upon request.
"Life"
Life has a way of throwing us a few curves from time to time; I've certainly had my share. You
may find yourself with some type of life difficulty, e.g. medical or personal, where you find that
you are not able to concentrate and spend time on your studies. I understand and completely
empathize and I wish I had the ability and training to help with these situations but I simply do not
have the ability, training or background to do so. If you find that you are in some type of crisis,
please feel free to talk to me about it. If it is a serious situation, and it often can be, I will direct you
to our counseling staff. Counselors are the trained professionals that have the education,
background, and experience to help you in difficult times. My strongest recommendation, speaking
as a mathematics professor, is that if you find yourself in a "space" where you simply can't
concentrate on your studies, for whatever reason, please consider dropping the course and/or taking
an incomplete (you do need to be passing the class at the time of an incomplete and administration
does require, if the situation is medical, a general note - nothing specific - from your physician
stating that you have some type of medical situation); it simply is not worth trying to continue in
the course and receive a poor grade on your college transcript if you don't have the time and energy
to put into the class. You will then have more time and be more able to deal with and resolve your
situation without the added pressure of trying to pass your college classes; also, please don't forget
that counselors are able to help or at least point you in the right direction for assistance. Please
remember that the course will almost always be available next semester so you can take it when
you are in a position or "space" to concentrate on your studies.
ATTENDANCE REQUIREMENT POLICY (reference: Student
Handbook)
Regular and prompt class attendance is expected of every student. Your absence means that you are
not able to participate in the class. Only approved college activities (e.g. field trips, collegesponsored conferences, and athletic events for the specific athletes) are deemed excused absences
for which the student has the right to make-up work. Instructors have the right to set their own
make-up policy, if any, for missed work due to other types of absence. While it is the final
responsibility of the student to drop a class that he/she is no longer attending, instructors may, at
their discretion, drop students without consultation with the student, when un-excused absences
number the equivalent of two weeks or exceed 10% of the total hours of class sessions, up to the 9 th
week of the semester or the 60% date of the enrolled course. After the 9 th week or 60% date,
students will be assigned the appropriate letter grade. PLEASE NOTE: Your instructor may drop
you from the course if you have not participated, e.g., not doing homework, in this class for a
continuous two-week period.
*** NOTE: For this class the 60% date falls on Monday, October 31.
PLEASE NOTE: Your instructor may drop you from the course if you have not participated,
e.g., not doing homework, in this class for a continuous two-week period for this course.
"Participation" is based on the RECOMMENDED course schedule and RECOMMENDED deadlines!
Also, an excerpt from the STUDENT HANDBOOK
You (the student) agree to:
***** Attend classes regularly and complete assigned work.
***** Complete your courses and maintain progress toward an educational goal.
REGISTRATION/IMPORTANT DATES
1) You will be dropped from this class if you are not registered on CourseCompass by the end of Week 1
of the semester - MONDAY August 29, 2011, 11:59 P.M. PST (Pacific Standard Time).
2) You must register for this class with the Office of Admissions and Records.
3) Last Day to Request a Refund for Full-Term Classes (10% Date) is FRIDAY, September 2, 2011.
4) Last Day to Declare Credit/No Credit (30% Date) is MONDAY, September 19, 2011.
5) Last Day to Drop with No Record is (30% Date) MONDAY, September 19, 2011.
6) Last Day to Drop for “W” Grade is (60% Date) MONDAY, October 31, 2011.
7) Course Officially Ends THURSDAY, December 8, 2011, 11:59 P.M. PST.
FAQ - What is a "W" grade and the 60% date?
The Last Day to Drop for a “W” Grade is (60% Date) Monday, October 31. After this date,
students will be assigned the appropriate letter grade.
The "W" grade will appear on your transcript but will not affect your G.P.A.; you will need to
repeat the class to satisfy pre-requisite, graduation and/or transfer requirements.
Dropping the class, however, may affect your eligibility for financial aid or insurance; eligibility
for such things often depends on the number of units a student is carrying. It is best to check with
your counselor about the consequences of dropping the class.
My suggestion is to put in the necessary time and make an extra effort to pass the class. :-)
Academic Integrity
As per the Kern Community College District Board Policy Manual, cheating is defined as follows.
Definition of Cheating--Cheating is defined as the act of obtaining, or attempting to obtain, or aiding
another to obtain academic credit for work by the use of any dishonest, deceptive, or fraudulent
means. Examples of cheating during an exam include, but are not limited to, the following:
copying, either in part or in whole, from another's exam; discussion of answers or ideas relating to
the answers on an exam unless such discussion is specifically authorized by the instructor; giving
or receiving copies of an exam without the permission of the instructor; using or displaying notes,
"cheat sheets," or other information or devices inappropriate to the prescribed exam conditions, as
when a test of competence includes a test of unassisted recall of information, skill, or procedure;
allowing someone other than the officially enrolled student to represent the same. Also included are
plagiarism as defined and altering or interfering with the grading procedures. It is often appropriate
for students to study together or to work in teams on projects. However, such students should be
careful to avoid the use of unauthorized assistance, and to avoid any implication of cheating, by
such means as sitting apart from one another in examinations, presenting the work in a manner
which clearly indicates the effort of each individual, or such other method as is appropriate to the
particular course.
If it is discovered that a student is cheating on either the exams, homework assignments, or
tutorials, then action will be taken against that student, as outlined in the Kern Community College
District Board Policy Manual.
Discussion and Email
A discussion board is provided on this site. Discussion is STRONGLY encouraged; there are no
requirements regarding posts, however, you are required to read all posts and replies. The primary
means of teacher-student, and student-student interaction will be discussion board. I most seriously
expect every person in this class, including myself, to conduct themselves in a civilized, mature,
and respectful manner when using these media. Abusive discourse directed at any student or
myself will not be tolerated and swiftly dealt with, as outlined by the Kern Community College
District Board Policy Manual.
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