ENGINEERING MECHANICS 1

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FACULTY OF ENGINEERING
SCHOOL OF MECHANICAL AND MANUFACTURING
ENGINEERING
COURSE OUTLINE
MMAN1300
ENGINEERING MECHANICS 1
Semester 2, 2012
CONTENTS
Page
Course at a glance
2
Course staff
2
Course Information
3
Assessment
4
Academic honesty and plagiarism
5
Resources for students
6
Course evaluation and improvement
6
Administrative matters
6
Course schedule
7
1
COURSE AT A GLANCE
Engineering Mechanics 1
Notes
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forces in equilibrium
the Free Body Diagram
practical applications
Shear Force & Bending
Moment at a section
Section
Block 1
Statics
 Kinematics of particles
(bodies in motion in the
absence of forces)
 Kinetics of particles
(∑F=ma, Work-energy
methods)
Block 2
 First Moment of Area
 Shear Force & Bending
Moment Diagrams
 Second Moment of Area
 Kinematics of rigid
bodies
 Kinetics of rigid bodies
Block 3
Dynamics
Statics &
Dynamics
Assessed activities
 Flying Fish Software
 Adaptive Tutorials :
th
 FBD (launch 17 July
th
and due 29 July)
 Truss and Friction
th
(launch 30 July and
th
due 10 August)
 Group Project 1 & Review
 Block test 1 on
th
14 Aug’ 2012 (Wk 5) (Tues
2-3pm)
(usual tut rooms)
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Flying Fish Software
Adaptive Tutorial
Practical (L206)
Block test 2 on
th
18 Sept’ 2012 (Wk 9)
(Tues 2-3pm)
(usual tut rooms)
 Adaptive Tutorials:
 Centroid and SF & BM
th
(launch 17 Sept and
th
due 30 Sept)
 Flying Fish
 Lab Experiment
 Block test 3 on
th
16 Oct’ 2012 (Wk 13)
(Tues 2-3pm)
(usual tut rooms)
FINAL EXAMINATION
COURSE STAFF
Assoc. Prof. Gangadhara Prusty
Room ME 506, [email protected],
MECHENG Building (J17)
Tel (02) 9385 5939
Email [email protected]
Assoc. Prof. Nicole Kessissoglou
Room M15, Willis Annex Lab Building (J 18)
Tel (02) 9385 4166
Email [email protected]
2
COURSE INFORMATION
Details
Units of credit: Six (6).
For MMAN1300 (6UoC) this means roughly:
In class
5 hours per week
Self-study
6 hours per week
Total
11 hours per week
Aims
1)
2)
3)
Introduce the fundamentals of engineering statics and dynamics, and how they
may be applied to solve practical engineering problems.
Develop documentation and communication skills
Start to develop “engineers’ eyes”
Context
This is your first course in “engineering mechanics”, which is the mathematics-based
engineering science that engineers use in design and problem solving. It is an important
tool for engineers, and also a foundation for later courses in our degree programs.
Expected student learning outcomes
Learning outcome
Understand the fundamentals of statics and dynamics.
Be proficient in using Statics and Dynamics to obtain solutions to
engineering problems.
Know the value of engineering mechanics.
Relate the fundamentals of Statics and Dynamics to practical
applications.
Develop documentation skills and correct professional technique.
Develop “engineers’ eyes”
UNSW graduate
attributes1
1,2,3,4
1,2,3,4
2
1,2,3,4,11
12
2
1
UNSW’s graduate attributes are shown at
www.secretariat.unsw.edu.au/acboard/approved_policy/graduate_attributes.pdf
and are:
1.
 the skills involved in scholarly enquiry;
2.
 an in-depth engagement with the relevant disciplinary knowledge in its interdisciplinary
context;
3.
 the capacity for analytical and critical thinking and for creative problem solving;
4.
 the ability to engage in independent and reflective learning;
5.
information literacy –– the skills to locate, evaluate and use relevant information;
6.
the capacity for enterprise, initiative and creativity;
7.
an appreciation of, and respect for, diversity;
8.
a capacity to contribute to, and work within, the international community;
9.
the skills required for collaborative and multidisciplinary work;
10.
an appreciation of, and a responsiveness to, change;
11.  a respect for ethical practice and social responsibility; and
12.  the skills of effective communication.
Teaching strategies
Component
Lectures
Tutorials
Activities
 Find out what you must learn
 Learn methods that are not in the textbook
 Follow worked examples
 Hear announcements on course changes
 Be guided by course notes and tutors
 Ask questions
3
Group work
Practical
Private study
(including Moodle)
Assessments (Block
tests, exams)
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Do problems, as set out in the course notes
Participate in Flying Fish Software tutorials
Discuss with friends
Study an aspect of engineering mechanics
Work with colleagues
Hands on experience with an experimental rig
Each student is required to submit a written report
Review lecture material and textbook
Do set problems and assignments
Adaptive Tutorials for improved learning
Practice with Flying Fish Software using Moodle
Discuss with friends
Join Moodle discussions of problems
Download materials from Moodle
Keep up with notices and find out marks via Moodle
Demonstrate your basic knowledge and skills
Learn from feedback
Demonstrate higher understanding and problem solving
ASSESSMENT
Scheme
Assessment is based on the blocks shown on pages 2 and 7. Basic knowledge is
assessed after each block. Marks for all components of the course are awarded as shown
below.
Basic marks Type of Assessment
Reason for assessment
Statics
7.5 block tests
5 Online tutorial
assessment
4 a) Individual and Group
project
10 b) Adaptive Tutorial
6 Laboratory exercise on
SF & BM
Test to assess basic knowledge in each
block of study
Weekly assessment
Amount learnt by each group assessed
face-to-face by a tutor at group reviews; Any
group member may be asked to explain the
work
Hands on experience with an experimental
rig; Each student is required to submit a
written report
Dynamics
7.5 block tests
15 Online tutorial
assessment
10 Laboratory exercises
35 Final exam on Statics
and Dynamics
components
Test to assess basic knowledge in each
block of study
Weekly assessment
Hands on experience with experimental
rigs;
Each student is required to submit individual
reports
The final exam provides an opportunity to
assess higher capabilities based on your
understanding of Statics and Dynamics
Total 100
4
ACADEMIC HONESTY AND PLAGIARISM
A standard UNSW statement follows.
What is Plagiarism?
Plagiarism is the presentation of the thoughts or work of another as one’s own.*
Examples include:
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direct duplication of the thoughts or work of another, including by copying material,
ideas or concepts from a book, article, report or other written document (whether
published or unpublished), composition, artwork, design, drawing, circuitry, computer
program or software, web site, Internet, other electronic resource, or another person’s
assignment without appropriate acknowledgement;
paraphrasing another person’s work with very minor changes keeping the meaning,
form and/or progression of ideas of the original;
piecing together sections of the work of others into a new whole;
presenting an assessment item as independent work when it has been produced in
whole or part in collusion with other people, for example, another student or a tutor;
and
claiming credit for a proportion a work contributed to a group assessment item that is
greater than that actually contributed.†
For the purposes of this policy, submitting an assessment item that has already been
submitted for academic credit elsewhere may be considered plagiarism.
Knowingly permitting your work to be copied by another student may also be considered
to be plagiarism.
Note that an assessment item produced in oral, not written, form, or involving live
presentation, may similarly contain plagiarised material.
The inclusion of the thoughts or work of another with attribution appropriate to the
academic discipline does not amount to plagiarism.
The Learning Centre website is main repository for resources for staff and students on
plagiarism and academic honesty. These resources can be located via:
www.lc.unsw.edu.au/plagiarism
The Learning Centre also provides substantial educational written materials, workshops,
and tutorials to aid students, for example, in:
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correct referencing practices;
paraphrasing, summarising, essay writing, and time management;
appropriate use of, and attribution for, a range of materials including text, images,
formulae and concepts.
Individual assistance is available on request from The Learning Centre.
Students are also reminded that careful time management is an important part of study
and one of the identified causes of plagiarism is poor time management. Students should
allow sufficient time for research, drafting, and the proper referencing of sources in
preparing all assessment items.
* Based on that proposed to the University of Newcastle by the St James Ethics Centre. Used with
kind permission from the University of Newcastle
† Adapted with kind permission from the University of Melbourne.
5
PRESENTATION REQUIREMENTS
All assessed materials should be neat and clear, and demonstrate professionalism.
Guidance can be found in the School’s publications Standard Specification for the
Presentation of Student Written Assignments and In a Nutshell, both of which are
provided in The Guide (see School General Office if you do not have a copy).
Group projects and practical reports should have a Standard School Cover Sheet.
RESOURCES FOR STUDENTS
Essential textbook (available through the UNSW bookshop)
Meriam J.L., Kraige L.G. Engineering Mechanics:
Vol. 1 – Statics, 6th Edition, SI Version. Wiley. (referred to as M&K(S))
Vol. 2 – Dynamics, 6th Edition, SI Version. Wiley. (referred to as M&K(D))
Moodle site for MMAN 1300 Access via: http://moodle.eng.unsw.edu.au/moodle
School study guide
(2006) The Guide to studying in the School of Mechanical and Manufacturing
Engineering, School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, UNSW.
School’s website www.mech.unsw.edu.au
Library (eg http://info.library.unsw.edu.au/web/services/services.html)
COURSE EVALUATION AND IMPROVEMENT
The UNSW CATEI process will be used to survey your responses to this course. In this
way we can identify the goods bits to keep for next time and the bits that need improving.
ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS
Information about each of the following matters is presented in a School handout,
Administrative Matters for All Courses, available from the School website:
www.mech.unsw.edu.au/content/userDocs/AdminMatters.pdf
It is essential that you obtain a copy, read it carefully and become familiar with the
information, as it applies to this course and to each of the other courses in which you are
enrolled. Expectations of students (including attendance at lectures and
tutorials/laboratory classes/seminars; and computer use, for example, in the use of email
and online discussion forums). Procedures for submission of assignments and the
School’s policy concerning late submission
Information on relevant Occupational Health and Safety policies and expectations:
www.ohs.unsw.edu.au
Examination procedures and advice concerning illness or misadventure
Equity and disability
Students who have a disability that requires some adjustment in their teaching or learning
environment are encouraged to discuss their study needs with the course convenor prior
to, or at the commencement of, their course, or with the Equity Officer (Disability) in the
Student Equity and Disability Unit (SEADU) by phone on on 9385 4734, email
[email protected] or via the website:
www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au/content/default.cfm?ss=0
The office is located on the Ground Floor of the Goodsell building (F20).
Issues to be discussed may include access to materials, signers or note-takers, the
provision of services and additional exam and assessment arrangements. Early
notification is essential to enable any necessary adjustments to be made.
6
COURSE SCHEDULE
3 hours lectures (Tue 1-2 (Physics Theatre), Wed 10-11 (Law Theatre G04) and Wed 121 (Science Theatre)) per week; 2 hours tutorial; 6 hours self study.
The course schedule below is broken into blocks so you can grasp the content of
engineering mechanics in manageable chunks.
Wk
3 hours of Lectures and 2 hours of Tutorial per week
Block 1: Statics
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1
2
3
4
Introduction, particle equilibrium
Isolation, FBDs, moments
Force, vectors, dot product
Equilibrium of single objects
Introduction to vectors
Trusses (group project 1)
Friction and equilibrium
Machines
Distributed forces
Shear Force and Bending Moment at a section
Block 2: Dynamics
th
Block 1 test (S) on 14 Aug’ 2012 (Tues 2-3pm)
5
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6
7
8
Kinematics of Particles
Position, velocity and acceleration of particles
Rectilinear motion
Curvilinear motion, x/y and n/t coordinates
Circular motion, Angular motion
Relative motion of two particles
Kinetics of Particles
Force, mass and acceleration of particles, Newton’s 2nd law
Work/Energy/Power
Impulse and Momentum, Impact
Plane Kinematics of Rigid Bodies
Types of rigid body motion
General plane motion
Block 3: Statics & Dynamics
Block 2 test (D) on 18th Sept’ 2012 (Wk 9) (Tues 2-3pm)
9
10
11
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12
13
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Shear Force and Bending Moment Diagrams (Statics component)
Centre of Gravity and Moment of Inertia
Centre of Mass & Mass Moments of Inertia (Dynamics Component)
Parallel Axis Theorem
Introduction to Kinetics of Rigid Bodies
Rigid body in plane motion
General equations of motion
Translation and fixed axis rotation
Work-Energy for a rigid body
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Block 3 test (S & D) on 16th Oct’ 2012 (Wk 13) (Tues 2-3pm)
Final exam on Statics and Dynamics
G Prusty & N Kessissoglou
July 2012
7
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