2014-03-20 - Nashville News

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Nashville News
The
Sheriff’s
Dept.
probes
ransacked
homes
The Howard
County Sheriff’s
Department is
investigating the
vandalization of
two unoccupied
houses.
According to a
statement issued
by Sheriff Butch
Morris, the investigation began
March 15, when
Deputy Joey Davis
received a report
of a vacant home
being vandalized
at 805 Possum
Hollow Road.
“The windows
had been busted
out and everything inside the
house had been
turned over,”
Morris said in the
statement. “A
bookshelf, two
metal army ammo
boxes and a cedar
hope chest were
reported missing
from the residence.”
One day
later, Deputy Jade
Hughes received
a similar report
from a house on
Anderson Road,
with similar damage observed at
the residence.
“The windows
and doors had
been busted out
and everything inside the house had
been turned over
and dumped onto
the loor,” Morris
explained.
Morris said
the owner of the
second property is
offering a $1,000
reward to anyone
with information
leading to the
arrest and conviction of those
responsible for the
incident.
Anyone with
such information
is urged to contact the Howard
County Sheriff’s
Department at
845-2626.
THURSDAY • March 20, 2014 • Issue 23 • 1 Section • 12 Pages • USPS 371-540 • 75 cents • PUBLISHED EACH MONDAY & THURSDAY In Howard County, Arkansas since 1878
Group opposes proposed annexation
CHARLES GOODIN
Editor
NASHVILLE - A group of
area landowners filed a petition Monday expressing
their disagreement with a
proposal to annex additional
property into the city limits.
A total of 18 Howard County landowners, most residing
in the Peachtree and Fox Run
communities, signed the petition, which has been filed
at both the Howard County
Clerk’s office and with the
city of Nashville.
The petition is in response
to a city limits expansion
Eighteen landowners ile
petition against city limit expansion
proposed by Mayor Billy
Ray Jones in January and
presented to city aldermen
by Code Enforcement Officer David Johnson at their
February meeting. Several
land owners were also present at that meeting, voicing
opposition to the move due
to a slight increase in property taxes, additional costs
for city services that would
result from the annexation
and the need to comply with
city ordinances.
Areas that would become
part of Nashville under the
plan include the Northern
Hills Estates, portions of Old
Airport Road, a nursing home
on North Main St., properties
located directly behind Lawrence Termite and Pest Control, a swath of the Prescott
Highway, a portion of Collins
Rd., two parcels of land on
Legacy Lane, six additional
parcels of land on Sand Hill
Rd., two sections of the bypass, the REA building near
The Elberta
Arts Center will
host its third
monthly paint
party Sat., March
22 beginning at 7
p.m. All supplies
are provided, fun
abounds, and participants will leave
with a inished
painting. Those
wishing to register
should call 870557-3512 so EAC
staff can prepare
a canvas they
arrive. The cost is
$35.
annexation of our properties
into the city of Nashville and
request advance notice of
any proceedings pertaining
to the city annexation of real
property belonging to the
undersigned,” the petition
states.
Jones said Tuesday that
the issue will be on the
agenda for the city council’s
March meeting, and reiterated that his support for the
measure stems primarily
from a desire to incorporate
properties already served by
city services into the town.
“After studying it out, that
See GROUP | Page 12
Motta resigns
from three boards
Community activist relocating to
Arizona to care for family member
CHARLES GOODIN
D.E. RAY
News Staff
D.E. RAY | Nashville News
Charles Henry “Peter Gun” Johnson, of Tollette, stands next to the mess left by what he
believes is a broken water main running underneath his property. Johnson said the water
has been present for a little over a month.
mending fences
Tollette’s lone city worker says most water, sewer
problems within the city have been remedied
D.E. RAY
Contributing Editor
Paint
party
scheduled
at Elberta
Wal-Mart, a portion of the
Tyson Foods facility and a
stretch of Buck Range Rd.
that connects South Fourth
St. to the bypass.
According to group organizer Angela Allen, the
petitioners represent every
home along East Peachtree
St. and Fox Run, and are
concerned about “the effects
of new city regulations on
their rural and agricultural
properties.”
“We the undersigned landowners hereby advise the
Nashville, Arkansas city government and Howard County
government that we oppose
TOLLETTE - Complaints
from several Tollette residents over seeping water
have been partly addressed,
according to city worker
Freddy Brown.
Residents had made complaints about water coming
up from the ground at the
sites of several suspected
broken pipes around the
city, some of which had
reportedly been producing
wet, sloppy messes for several months now.
The complaints also encompass the large number
of vacant and dilapidated
houses in the town, some
of which have been called
D.E. RAY | Nashville News
This trailer is one of several dilapidated structures in the
Tollette area that have been a source of complaint among
residents attending the town’s city council meetings.
both fire and health hazards,
and a lack of infrastructure. Roads and emergency
equipment such as fire hydrants were also cited.
A leak near the home of
Jerry Dickinson, on Pump
Station Street, which had
reportedly been seeping
See TOLLETTE | Page 12
NASHVILLE - Local community activist Albert Motta announced his resignation from three area boards
this week and said he and
his family will be leaving the
county sometime in May.
Motta, 49, served as
chairman of the Howard
County Democratic Central
Committee, the Howard
County Election Commission and the Elberta Arts
Council board until Tuesday, when he submitted
letters of resignation to
each organization. He said
Wednesday his departure
from the area is rooted in
the need to care for his
wife’s mother, who resides
in Arizona.
“We knew someday that
we would have to take care
of Vicky’s mom. We didn’t
know that it would happen
this soon, but her heart is
working at 1/3 capacity,
and her kidneys are failing.
She needs around the clock
care and it falls to Vicky to
take care of her mother,”
he explained. “We didn’t
get married to be alone. We
didn’t have children to have
them raised by one of us,
and not knowing how long
it’s going to be, we need to
be there to support Vicky as
she helps her mom through
the winter of her life.”
His resignation submitted to the Elberta Arts
Council was accepted with
regret by the members.
“We hate to lose him.
He’s been a great president
and has done a lot to help
us, as well as others in the
area. He’s been an asset
to the community in general,” said longtime Elberta
Arts participant and former
president Cindy Petty.
Fellow board member
Mike Graves also expressed
regret at Motta’s resignation.
“Life is not going to be as
interesting in Howard County without Albert Motta,”
Graves said.
Motta’s resignation from
the election commission is
a more complicated matter, as notification must be
made to a wide variety of
county and state officials.
Among the groups that
are to be notified of the
resignation of a Democratic election commissioner
is the county Democratic
committee. Motta notified
the group during their Tuesday night monthly meeting
and the committee accepted the resignation, naming
Dierks teacher Larry Jones
to replace Motta on the
commission.
Motta also submitted his
resignation as chairman of
the Democratic committee
at the same time, to take efSee MOTTA | Page 12
Red Cross
blood drive
scheduled
Paper brings home awards at advertising conference
The American
Red Cross will
host a blood drive
April 10 from
3-7 p.m. at the
Centerpoint Community Center,
located at 210 N.
Centerpoint St.
NASHVILLE - The Nashville
News brought home three
first place awards Friday at
the Arkansas Press Association’s annual advertising
conference.
Howard County’s oldest
continually operating business, the News took first in
the ‘best special section,’
‘best real estate classified ad’
and ‘single ad a half page or
larger’ categories.
The best special section
award was received for last
year’s football preview, while
the real estate ad was prepared for Ray & Associates.
The single ad winner was
for a display ad promoting
York Gary.
Editor Charles Goodin
said he was proud of his paper’s showing and attributed
the success to those who
purchased the ads in the
first place.
“As always, we owe a debt
Church to
host ‘Mega
Sunday’
event
Lifeline
Ministry Church
of God in Christ,
located at 116
E. Supert, invites
the public to its
‘Mega Sunday’
event on Sun.,
March 30 at 3:30
p.m. with Elder
Allen White from
Victory Temple of
Hope. The theme
is, “God keeps his
promises.”
of gratitude to our advertisers for providing us with the
opportunity to win these
awards,” Goodin said. “Congratulations to our advertising staff on a job well done.”
In addition to the three
first place finishes, the News
earned second place in the
‘best of division’ category,
third in the ‘promotion of
newspaper’ division and
honorable mentions in ‘best
special section’ and ‘best
special section cover.’
The best of division award,
meanwhile, goes to the paper
with the best ads out of all
the newspapers in a given
division. The Nashville News
competes in the ‘smaller
weekly’ division, which had
181 entries this year.
Awards for the editorial
department of the newspaper will be presented at the
APA’s annual conference in
July.
CHARLES GOODIN | Nashville News
Nashville News Managing Editor A.J. Smith is pictured with advertising staff Katie Whisenhunt,
Donna Harwell and Cindy Harding.
2 Editorial
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
Facts & Factions
At a time when polls show public opinion turning
against the Democrats, some Republicans seem to be
turning against each other. Even with the prospect
of being able to win control of the Senate in this fall's
elections, some Republicans are busy manufacturing
ammunition for their own circular firing squad.
A Republican faction's demonization of their own
Senate Minority Leader, Mitch McConnell, is a classic
example. If you listen to some of those who consider
themselves the only true
conservatives, you would
never guess that Senator
ThOmas
McConnell received a lifesOWELL
time 90 percent ranking
Creators
by the American ConserSyndicate
vative Union — and in
one recent year had a 100
percent ranking.
Ann Coulter — whose
conservative credentials nobody has ever challenged
— points out in her column that Mitch McConnell
has not only led the fight for conservative principles
repeatedly, but has been to the right of Ted Cruz on
immigration issues.
Someone once said that, in a war, truth is the first
casualty. That seems to be the case for some in this
internal war among Republicans. As the late Daniel
Patrick Moynihan said, "You are entitled to your own
opinion, but not to your own facts."
Why should those of us who are not Republicans be
concerned about any of this?
Fortunately or unfortunately, we have a two-party
system in this country. And — very unfortunately —
we are at a crucial point in the history of America, and
perhaps approaching a point of no return.
The unfolding disaster of ObamaCare is only the
most visible symptom of a far deeper danger from a
lawless administration in Washington that unilaterally
changes laws passed by Congress. President Obama
has nearly three more years to continue doing irreparable damage to the fundamental basis of American
government and Americans' freedom.
Only Republican control of the Senate can rein in
the lawless Obama administration, which can otherwise load up the federal courts with lawless judges,
who will be dismantling the rule of law and destroying the rights of the people, for decades after Barack
Obama himself is long gone from the White House.
Once that happens, even a future Republican majority, led by people with the kind of ideological purity
that the Republican dissidents want, cannot undo the
damage.
The Senate's power to confirm or not confirm
presidential nominees to the federal courts is the only
thing that can prevent Barack Obama from leaving that
kind of toxic legacy in the federal courts, including the
Supreme Court.
Only Republican control of both houses of Congress
can repeal, or even seriously revise, ObamaCare.
And only Republican control of both houses of Congress plus the White House can begin to reverse the
many lawless, reckless and dangerous policies of the
Obama administration, at home and overseas.
This year's elections and the 2016 presidential election may be among the most important elections in the
history of this country, and can determine what kind
of country this will be for years — and even generations — to come.
Those Republicans who seem ready to jeopardize
their own party's chances of winning these two crucial
elections by following a rule-or-ruin fight against fellow
Republicans may claim to be following their ideals. But
headstrong self-righteousness is not idealism, and it is
seldom a way to advance any cause.
Politics, like war, is a question of power. If you don't
have power, you can make fiery speeches or even
conduct attention-getting filibusters, but that does not
fundamentally change anything. And it has accomplished nothing in this case.
No doubt there can be legitimate differences of
opinion about tactics and strategy on particular issues. But, if you don't have power, these are just empty
clashes over debating points.
Certainly there has been much for which the Republican leadership has deserved to be criticized over the
years — and this column has made such criticisms for
decades. But, when the question is whether Mitch McConnell is preferable to Harry Reid as Majority Leader
in the Senate, that is not even a close call.
If the rule-or-ruin faction among Republicans ends
up giving the Democrats another Senate majority under Harry Reid, not only the Republican Party but the
entire nation, and generations yet unborn, will end up
paying the price.
The Nashville News
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Established 1878. Published since Sept. 1, 1979
by Graves Publishing Company, Inc.
Lawrence Graves, President
Buds of the socialist spring
“Boys from another
school pulled out the severed head of a classmate
while fishing in a pond. His
whole family had died. Had
they eaten him first? Or had
he survived the deaths of his
parents only to be killed by a
cannibal? No one knew; but
such questions were commonplace for the children of
Ukraine in 1933. ... Yet cannibalism was, sometimes,
a victimless crime. Some
mothers and fathers killed
their children and ate them.
... But other parents asked
their children to make use
of their own bodies if they
passed away. More than one
Ukrainian child had to tell
a brother or sister: ‘Mother
says that we should eat her
if she dies.’”
-- Timothy Snyder, “Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin” (2010)
WASHINGTON -- While
Vladimir Putin, Stalin’s
spawn, ponders what to
do with what remains of
Ukraine, remember: Nine
years before the January
1942 Wannsee Conference,
at which the Nazis embarked
on industrialized genocide,
Stalin deliberately inflicted
genocidal starvation on
Ukraine.
To fathom the tangled
forces, including powerful
ones of memory, at work in
that singularly tormented
place, begin with Snyder’s
stunning book. Secretary of
State John Kerry has called
Russia’s invasion of Ukraine
“a 19th-century act in the
GEORGE
WILL
Washington
Post
21st century.” Snyder reminds us that “Europeans
deliberately starved Europeans in horrific numbers in
the middle of the 20th century.” Here is Snyder’s distillation of a Welsh journalist’s
description of a Ukrainian
city:
“People appeared at 2
o’clock in the morning to
queue in front of shops that
did not open until 7. On an
average day 40,000 people
would wait for bread. Those
in line were so desperate to
keep their places that they
would cling to the belts of
those immediately in front
of them. ... The waiting lasted
all day, and sometimes for
two. ... Somewhere in line a
woman would wail, and the
moaning would echo up and
down the line, so that the
whole group of thousands
sounded like a single animal
with an elemental fear.”
This, which occurred
about as close to Paris as
Washington is to Denver,
was an engineered famine,
the intended result of Stalin’s
decision that agriculture
should be collectivized and
the “kulaks” -- prosperous
farmers -- should be “liquidated as a class.” In January
1933, Stalin, writes Snyder,
sealed Ukraine’s borders so
peasants could not escape
and sealed the cities so peasants could not go there to
beg. By spring, more than
10,000 Ukrainians were dying each day, more than the
6,000 Jews who perished
daily in Auschwitz at the
peak of extermination in the
spring of 1944.
Soon many Ukrainian children resembled “embryos
out of alcohol bottles” (Arthur Koestler’s description)
and there were, in Snyder’s
words, “roving bands of
cannibals”: “In the villages
smoke coming from a cottage chimney was a suspicious sign, since it tended
to mean that cannibals were
eating a kill or that families
were roasting one of their
members.”
Snyder, a Yale historian, is
judicious about estimates of
Ukrainian deaths from hunger and related diseases, settling on an educated guess of
approximately 3.3 million, in
1932-33. He says that when
“the Soviet census of 1937
found 8 million fewer people
than projected,” many of
the missing being victims
of starvation in Ukraine and
elsewhere (and the children
they did not have), Stalin
“had the responsible demographers executed.”
Putin, who was socialized
in the Soviet-era KGB apparatus of oppression, aspires
to reverse the Soviet Union’s
collapse, which he considers
“the greatest geopolitical
catastrophe of the [20th]
century.” Herewith a final
description from Snyder of
the consequences of the
Soviet system, the passing of
which Putin so regrets:
“One spring morning,
amidst the piles of dead
peasants at the Kharkiv
market, an infant suckled
the breast of its mother,
whose face was a lifeless
gray. Passersby had seen
this before ... that precise
scene, the tiny mouth, the
last drops of milk, the cold
nipple. The Ukrainians had
a term for this. They said to
themselves, quietly, as they
passed: ‘These are the buds
of the socialist spring.’”
U.S. policymakers, having allowed their wishes to
father their thoughts, find
Putin incomprehensible. He
is a barbarian but not a monster, and hence no Stalin.
But he has been coarsened,
in ways difficult for civilized
people to understand, by
certain continuities, institutional and emotional, with
an almost unimaginably vicious past. And as Ukraine,
a bubbling stew of tensions
and hatreds, struggles with
its identity and aspirations,
Americans should warily remember William Faulkner’s
aphorism: “The past is never
dead. It’s not even past.”
nnn
Author’s note: I wish to
apologize to The New York
Times for inadvertently reproducing without attribution 12
words from an October 2007
Times story describing the
1971 Bon Vivant botulism and
bankruptcy episode.
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3
Thursday, March 20, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397
Candidate
forum planned
for mid-april
D.E. Ray
Contributing Editor
NASHVILLE - A candidates’
forum has been hosted every election year in Howard
County in recent memory.
The event, put on by the
Howard County Democratic
Central Committee, is set this
year for Tues., April 15.
The group set the event
and discussed details at
their monthly meeting Tuesday night. Chairman Albert
Motta proposed that the
menu for the event be brisket and sides - a meal that
committee member, Nashville fire chief and Quorum
Court member Jerry Harwell
had agreed to prepare if the
committee purchased the
food. The committee approved the idea, and also
asked vice chair LaJeana
Jones to contact the foodservice staff at Nashville
Nursing Home to provide
deserts and servers for the
event, which they have done
in the past.
The committee had also
been approached about
holding a joint event at the
same time and location. The
group tentatively approved
the idea of a debate between
county level candidates,
but several members opposed the idea of having a
Republican participant in
an event paid for solely by
Democrats. Other organizers
of the proposed debate had
suggested a debate between
the contested races for the
District 19 legislative seat,
Howard County sheriff, circuit clerk and possibly Justice of the Peace positions.
One of the other groups
involved had proposed including Justin Gonzales, who
does not face a challenger
in the Republican primary,
as well as Matt Smith and
Jeremy Ross, who are facing
each other in the Democratic
primary and then will face
Gonzales in the race for the
legislative seat.
Also at the meeting the
group heard a report from
the state Democratic meeting this past Saturday. A
representative from the local committee attended the
meeting, which was held in
Pine Bluff. He described the
speakers at the state meeting, which included: Mark
Robertson, an architect running to be Commissioner of
State Lands, Karen Garcia,
former head of accounting
for Weyerhaeuser who is a
candidate for State Treasurer, Regina Stewart Hampton,
longtime state auditor employee who is running to be
State Auditor, Susan Inman,
candidate for Secretary of
State, and Lynette Bryant
and Mike Ross, candidates
for governor.
The report also included
an invitation to attend the
next state Democratic meeting, which is set for May 31 at
Henderson State University
campus in Arkadelphia.
Also at the meeting, the
Howard County Democrats
heard and rejected Motta’s
resignation as chairman,
and selected a replacement
for Motta for the Howard
County Election Commission. Dierks schoolteacher
Larry Jones will be filling the
position.
Church to host “Blessed
Beyond measure” concert
The sister trio "Blessed
Beyond Measure" will be in
concert Sun., April 6, at Okay
Community Baptist Church
near Saratoga.
The concert is free. A
love offering will be taken
for a mission trip to South
Africa for one of the group
members.
For information, call 580584-5433.
No bids
received on
park project
a.J. Smith
Managing Editor
NASHVILLE – The Nashville Parks and Recreation
board members met Tues.,
March 18 to discuss upcoming updates to the park.
The park has not received any bids for the
outlook arbor construction
on the Ronny K. Woods
Wildlife Trail. According to
Park Director Nikki Cherry,
there is one contractor that
has stated they would submit a bid; however, if the
bid is rejected it will have
to be rebid. The stream
deck plans were read and
approved by the board to
be sent to bid.
The basketball court construction, funded by the
2013 Outdoor Recreation
Grant, is moving along as
planned. The pad is finished
and ready to start framing.
The March for Parks event
raised a total of $5,055.99.
The funds raised by the
event will be used for Ronny
Woods Pavilion construction.
The board voted unanimously to remove the credit
card machines and phones
lines from the new softball
and baseball concession
stands after it was explained
that the devices are rarely
used and do not justify paying fees related to the service.
The board also waived
the ball field fees for the
baseball association’s jamboree, but the park will not
give the baseball association
the concession profit.
Marie Cromer, 91, Loving Mother, March 17
Mrs. Marie M. Cromer, 91, of Blevins, Arkansas passed away Monday, March 17, 2014 in Nashville,
Arkansas. Marie was born November 29, 1922 in Prescott, Arkansas to Edgar Venson and Nellie
Harris Avery.
Mrs. Cromer was a homemaker and a member of Bells Chapel Nazarene Church of Blevins.
She was preceded in death by her mother and father; husband, Cecil B. White; husband, Jack
Cromer; three brothers, Doris Avery, Alton Avery and Vernon Avery; four sisters, Venita Avery,
Velma Lowdermilk, Lorene Gibson and Louise Steed.
She is survived by two sons, Mike White of Hope and Jerry White of Blevins; one daughter,
Brenda and Jim Crosby of Jefferson City, Missouri; one grandson, Ryan Crosby of Jefferson City,
Missouri; and one granddaughter, Justice White and Jamie of Hope.
Visitation will be Wednesday, March 19, 2014 between the hours of 6:00-8:00 p.m. at HerndonPharr Funeral Home.
Services will be Thursday, March 20, 2014 at 2:00 p.m. in the Herndon-Pharr Funeral Home Chapel with Rev.
Wayne Bell oficiating, interment will follow in Marlbrook Cemetery under the direction of Herndon-Pharr Funeral
Home.
Online guest book at www.pharrfuneralhomes.com
Betty Gilbert, 80, Civic Leader, March 16
Mrs. Betty Lou Gilbert, age 80 of Cross Roads, Arkansas, passed away, Sunday, March 16, at her
home. She was born July 20, 1933 in Hempstead County, Arkansas to Sherman Roberts and Lillian
Roberts Hickerson.
Mrs. Gilbert attended the Old Liberty Church, as music leader, former choir member of
First United Methodist Church of Hope, a former member of the Good Life Singers, former
Chairperson of the Hempstead County Democratic Women, former Secretary &Treasurer of
Crossroads Volunteer Fire Department, former Secretary & Treasurer of Yellow Creek Cemetery
and was a former Chairperson for Save Okay Cement plant.
She was preceded in death by her parents; a brother; Richard E. “Sonny” Roberts; and a greatgrandson, Luke Easterling.
Mrs. Gilbert is survived by her loving and devoted husband of 71 years, Charles William Gilbert of Cross Roads;
her son, Charles William Gilbert, II, wife, Patty of Cross Roads; her daughter, Charlene Ort, husband, Randy of North
Little Rock; brother, Sherman Roberts of Cambridge, Massachusetts; three grandchildren, Dawn Michelle “Shelly”
Easterling of Cross Roads, Krystal Jean Gilbert of Fayetteville and Tara Chenelle Beebe of North Little Rock.
In lieu of lowers memorial may be made to Westmoreland Cemetery, % Mrs. Bonnie Jo Kaufman, 1147 Hwy. 195
S. Washington, Arkansas 71862 or Old Liberty Church, % Rebecca Clendenen, 120 Hempstead 10, Fulton, Arkansas
71838.
Visitation was held from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., Tuesday, March 18, 2014 at Brazzel/Oakcrest Funeral Home, 1001
South Main Street Hope.
Funeral services for Mrs. Gilbert were held at 2:00 p.m., Wednesday, March 19, 2014 at Old Liberty Church in
the Crossroads Community. Mr. Randy Ort and Brother Charles Hawley will oficiate the service. Burial to follow in
Westmoreland Cemetery at Cross Roads.
Arrangements by Brazzel/Oakcrest The Funeral Home of Hope, Eddie Brazzel, Director.
Online guestbook at www.brazzelfuneralhomes.com
Jodie Chandler
Bobbie Nichoalds,
Jodie Chandler, 58, of Nashville,
passed away on Monday, March 17,
2014. She was born on February 8,
1956 in Nashville, the daughter of
the late George Lockeby and Sadie
(Gibson) Lockeby.
Survivors include her husband,
Charles Chandler of Nashville; one daughter,
Kristi Chandler Wastian, and husband, Darrell
of Murfreesboro; two grandchildren, Kimberly
Wastian and Tyler Wastian, both of Murfreesboro;
one brother, Herman Lockeby, and wife, Jan of
Las Vagas, Nevada; two sisters, Alice Sawayer and
husband, Paul and Mary Driver and husband, Doyle
all of Plainview, Texas; a host of other relatives and
friends mourn her passing.
Graveside Services will be Friday, March 21, 2014
at 2:00 p.m. at Oak Grove Cemetery in Murfreesboro,
under the direction of Latimer Funeral Home in
Nashville.
You may send an online sympathy message at
http://www.latimerfuneralhome.com.
Bobbie Lynn Nichoalds, 71, of
Lonoke, Arkansas was born February
9, 1943 in Nashville, Arkansas to the
late Woodrow and Beatrice McLarty
and passed away in North Little Rock
on Thursday, March 13, 2014.
She is survived by her husband and
soul mate David Nichoalds whom she married on
August 31, 1990, as well as her children Jessica
Eoff of Porter, Texas and Natalie Dickens of
Texarkana; her sister, Peggy Hopper of Nashville;
her grandchildren, Jeremy and Jared Eoff, both of
Norman, Oklahoma, Justin Brown and Victoria
Dickens, both of Texarkana.
A Born Again Life Celebration Gathering will
be held on Friday, March 21, 2014 at 10:00 a.m. at
Grifin Leggett Rest Hills Funeral Home in North
Little Rock, 7724 Landers Road, and the family will
receive friends for Visitation, on Thursday, March
20, 2014 from 6:00-8:00 p.m. at the Funeral Home.
In Lieu of lowers please make memorials to
the American Diabetes Association, PO Box 1834,
Merriield, VA 22116-8034.
Please visit www.grifinleggettresthills.com to
sign the online guest book.
Pete Richardson, 50, Lafayette Co. Chief Deputy, March 17
Pete Richardson of Lake Earling, Arkansas passed away March 17, 2014. Pete was born
December 4, 1963 to John William and Virble Bryant Richardson in Manteca, California.
Chief Deputy Pete Richardson was a 19-year veteran of the Lafayette County Sheriff’s Ofice.
He was preceded in death by his father, John W. Richardson, Sr.; one brother, Danny Joe
Richardson and mother-in-law, Margaret Pearson.
Those left to cherish his memory are his wife, Melanie Pearson Richardson of Lake Earling;
one son, Chad LeFleur and wife Nikki; two daughters, Lindsey Bell and husband Jay and Natasha
Bailey; his mother, Virble Richardson; one brother, John W. Richardson, Jr. and wife Diana; two
sisters, Brenda Tinkes and Jackie Kay Fields and husband Terry; father-in-law, Denzel Pearson; brother-in-laws, Ted
Pearson and wife Sheila and Jack Pearson and wife Barbara; sister-in-law, Leah Dauzat; grandchildren, Gage LeFleur,
Jaksen LaFleur, Macall Trosclair, Lanie Bell and Gracelynn Bell and six aunts, three uncles and numerous nieces and
nephews.
Memorial service will be held Saturday, March 22, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. in the First Baptist Church of Stamps with
Rev. Joseph Gillentine and under the direction of Herndon-Pharr Funeral Home.
In lieu of lowers memorials may be given in memory of Pete Richardson to the Springhill Christian Church
Building Fund, 308 Eleventh Northeast Street, Springhill, Louisiana, 71075.
www.swarkansasnews.com
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Terry Ray Warehouse 1/2 mile
East of Roadmart on Hwy 371
Delores Davis & Shelia Kinslow
Fri., March 21 & Sat., March 22
7:30 Until
“Cleaning Out The House”
4 Home & Family
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
Cleanup day scheduled at
Old Washington State Park
WASHINGTON – Just
over 150 years after the
first shots of the Civil War
were fired, another wave of
volunteers is about to descend on America’s storied
battlegrounds – only this
array of dedicated men and
women will be armed with
paint brushes, trash bags
and weed whackers.
On Sat., April 5 at 9 a.m.,
history buffs and preservationists from around the
country will team up with
the Civil War Trust to help
clean and restore America’s
priceless battlefields, cemeteries and shrines. The
nationwide effort – dubbed
Park Day – is underwritten
with a grant from History™,
formerly The History Chan-
nel, and has been endorsed
by Take Pride in America, a
division of the U.S. Department of the Interior.
Park Day, now in its 18th
year, is an annual hands-on
preservation event created
by the Trust to assist local
groups with the maintenance of Civil War sites. This
year, more than 100 sites in
22 states are expected to
take part in the effort, with
activities ranging from trash
removal to trail building.
In exchange for their hard
work, volunteers receive
t-shirts and learn the site’s
history from local experts.
Historic Washington State
Park will participate in Park
Day 2014. Volunteers are
needed to clean and plant
flowerbeds, power wash
fences, clean out fence lines,
pick up trash and help us
make the park beautiful.
Participants will receive a
T-Shirt or patch in thanks
for their help. Bottled water,
snacks and a picnic lunch
will be provided through the
generosity of local sponsors.
For more information
about Park Day at Historic
Washington, please contact
Vicky Schoeneweis, Volunteer Coordinator by phone
at 870-983-2558 or by e-mail
at [email protected]
With 55,000 members,
the Civil War Trust is the
largest nonprofit battlefield
preservation organization in
the United States.
A
drain Wayne Johnson
Jr., of Hot Springs Village, and Frankie and
Robert Adams, of Bonnerdale,
announce the engagement
and approaching marriage of
their daughter and niece, Hayley Johnson, to Jackie White,
of Kirby.
Johnson is a 2010 graduate of Mt.
Ida High School who is employed
at First Step in Hot Springs. White,
the son of Jeff and Penny White, of
Kirby, is a 2007 graduate of Kirby
High School who works for R&B
Logging in Glenwood. His grandparents are Paul and Virginia Bailey, of
Nashville, and Betty Arter and the
late Dewey White, of Kirby.
The couple will be united in matrimony Sat., March 29 at 3 p.m. at
the Nazarene Church in Glenwood.
Friends and family are invited to
attend.
Nashville School District accepting referrals
The Nashville School District’s gifted and
talented program is now accepting referrals
for new students for the 2014-2015 school
year.
Students nominated must exhibit out-
YOU ARE
INVITED!!!
FRIENDS & FAMILY
EVENT AT SEARS
HOMETOWN STORE!
Sunday, March 23rd &
Monday, March 24th
We will be open extended hours
till 8 p.m. Monday!
COME AND CHECK
OUT THE SAVINGS!
• EXTRA 15% off all Home Appliances!
• EXTRA 10% off most everything else..
including Lawn and Garden!
• Get another 5% off in appliances for using
your Searscard and if you don’t have one
apply and get the 5% off anyway!!!
23 Southpark Shopping Center
Nashville, AR.
870-845-3200
standing abilities in the area of intellect,
creativity and task commitment. Please
contact Kristi Cox at 845-3262 for forms and
information. All requests for testing must be
in writing. Deadline for requests is April 25.
Community 5
Thursday, March 20, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397
How to eat out and stay healthy at the same time
It doesn’t matter if you
have a diet with special dietary concerns, or are just
watching what you eat to
lose weight; eating out can
be a concern. Whether it’s
a business meeting over
lunch, carry-out dinner,
or a fast-food meal, eating
out is a part of our busy
lives. We eat out because
it’s easy, it’s quick, and it’s
fun. But is it healthy?
It can be; if you plan
ahead and choose wisely,
you will likely find foods
that fit into our meal plan.
Many restaurants are trying to meet the growing
demand of diners’ health
needs. Whether those
needs be low sodium, low
fat, low carbohydrate, low
sugar or any combination
mentioned.
Some restaurants offer
foods lower in cholesterol,
fat, and sodium, and higher
in fiber. Most have fruit
juice and decaffeinated
coffee. Many offer reducedcalorie salad dressings,
low-fat or fat-free milk, and
salt substitutes.
If you eat away from
home a lot, you need to
find ways to follow your
meal plan as much as pos-
sible. Pick a restaurant
with a variety of choices
to increase your chances
of finding the foods you
want and order only what
you need and want. Here’s
how to order so that you
will hopefully follow your
meal plan.
* If you don’t know
what’s in a dish or don’t
know the serving size, ask.
* Try to eat the same
portion as you would at
home. If the serving size is
larger, put the extra food
in a doggie bag before you
start eating, or share with
someone else.
* Ask for fish or meat
broiled with no extra butter.
* If you are on a reduced-sodium meal plan,
ask that no salt be added
to your food.
* If you are a diabetic
and are eating out with
others, ask them to eat at
your usual time.
* Have reservations and
be on time. Avoid the times
when the restaurant is
busiest so you won’t have
to wait.
Fast food restaurants
probably pose the biggest
challenge when eating out.
But, believe it or not, you
Extension
Tips
can make healthy fastfood choices. How? Know
exactly what you are ordering and plan ahead.
When it is time to order,
what you order is the key.
It’s easy to eat an entire
day’s worth of fat, salt,
and calories in just one
fast-food meal. But it’s
also possible to make wise
choices and eat a fairly
healthy meal.
Some tips that can help
you choose well include:
* Know that an average
fast-food meal runs about
685 calories. Sometimes
more depending upon
what you order. Consult
the nutrition facts at most
restaurants to make the
best choices for your diet.
* If ordering breakfast
from a fast food restaurant, follow your diet plan.
To make the healthiest
choices, choose a plain bagel, toast, or English muffin. Other muffins may be
by Jean A. Ince
Staff chairman
UofA Cooperative Extension
Service • Howard County
loaded with sugar and fat.
Add fruit juice, or low-fat
or fat-free milk. Order cold
cereal with fat-free milk,
pancakes without butter,
or plain scrambled eggs.
Avoid bacon and sausage.
These are loaded with sodium, fat and calories.
* Watch out for words
like jumbo, giant, or deluxe. Larger portions mean
more calories as well as
more fat, cholesterol, and
salt. Order a regular or junior-size sandwich instead.
* Order bean burritos,
soft tacos, and other nonfried items when eating
Mexican fast foods. Choose
chicken over beef. Avoid
beans refried in lard. Pile
on extra lettuce, tomatoes, and salsa. Go easy
on cheese, sour cream,
and guacamole. Watch
out for deep – fried taco
salad shells – a taco salad
can have more than 1,000
calories.
* Pizza can be a good
fast-food choice. Go for
thin-crust pizza with vegetable toppings. Meat and
extra cheese add calories,
fat, and sodium.
* End your meal with
sugar-free, fat-free frozen
yogurt. Ices, sorbets, and
sherbets have less fat and
fewer calories than ice
cream. But they are also
high in sugar.
Eating out can be one of
life’s great pleasures. Make
the right choices, ask for
what you need and balance your meals out with
healthy meals at home.
You can enjoy yourself and
take charge of your health
at the same time.
For more information
on eating out, contact the
Howard County Extension
Office at 870-845-7517 or
visit our office located on
the second floor of the
courthouse.
Recipe of the Week
Here is a great way to
enjoy a taste of spring. This
recipe is from the Cooking
with Extension cookbook.
It is great for potlucks and
is super easy to make.
Three Fruit Salad
State announces road closure at Daisy State Park
KIRBY - West Park Road
within Daisy State Park will
be closed permanently to
through traffic beginning
May 1, according to State
Parks Director Greg Butts.
“This road, an alternate
route heading south from
U.S. 70 into the park, causes
frustration for visitors entering Daisy State Park
when it is mistaken by eastbound travelers on U.S. 70
as the park’s main entrance
road. That road, East Park
Road, is a paved road that’s
1,500 feet ahead,” Butts
said. “West Park Road was
never intended to be an entrance for our park visitors.
It is not paved and includes
a steep hill. Campers with
large RV’s that attempt the
climb often get stuck and
require assistance. The
closure of West Park Road
at the park’s boundary will
prevent this from happening again.”
Butts noted that enhanced security for park
visitors will be another benefit resulting from this road
closure.
Signage has been installed
on West Park Road notifying
Per
Month
Price
870.898.5649 | Cell: 903.293.7048
2104 Buck Wright Rd.
Ashdown, Arkansas
Weekdays - 18 holes w/cart - $20
Weekends - 18 holes w/cart - $25
New Spring
Arrivals
Custom
hand-made
wreaths
Hurry in and see these adorable items!
Erin Bledsoe & David McCrary
will wed Saturday, April 5, 2014 at
Cross Point Cowboy Church
(Registered at Power Pharmacy)
drivers of the road’s upcom-
1 (8 oz.) can chunk pineapple, drained
1 (11 oz.) can mandarin
oranges, drained
2 0 g re e n , s e e d l e s s
grapes washed
¼ cup chopped nuts or
¼ cup toasted coconut
Toss pineapple, mandarin oranges, and grapes
in medium bowl. Top with
chopped nuts or toasted
coconut. Chill. Serve. Yield
6 servings
Nutrition Information
Per Serving: 100 calories,
fat 3.5g, protein 1 g, carbohydrate 17g, fiber <1g,
sodium 10mg
ATTENTION INVESTORS & HOME BUYERS
* COURT ORDERED *
Real Estate AUCTIO
ing closure to through traffic.
N
W ed n esd a y, April2n d @ 12 N o o n
Masonic
Fish Fry
12684 Hw y. 9 M a lvern , AR 72104
S EL L IN G TO TH E H IG H ES T B ID D ER O N AU C TIO N D AY
1578 + / - S F 2 or 3 b ed room , 1 b ath hom e w ith 2- car garage
b u ilt in 1975 an d rem od eled in 2008 w ith 75% of the rem od el
b ein g com p leted . The hom e is n icely situ ated on 7.7+ / - acres
w ith H w y. fron tage. This all electric hom e has a n ew L en n ox
cen tral heat an d air, n ew w in d ow s, n ew w alk- in cu stom tile
show er, real hard w ood floorin g, w ood b u rn in g firep lace, b rick
exterior w ith a n ew m etal roof. It has a asp halt d rive- w ay,
b arn an d storage b u ild in gs. This p rop erty is located ju st 5
m iles sou th of M alvern on H w y. 9, in the cou n try area b u t
close to tow n . This is a very n ice p iece of p rop erty w ith a
large p on d on the b ack corn er an d b u ild ab le lot ad jacen t .
R EAL ES TATE TER M S : $5,000.00 d ow n p aym en t in the form
of a cashier’s check m ad e ou t to F ow ler Au ction eers In c. as a
n on - refu n d ab le d ep osit d ay of au ction , b alan ce d u e at
closin g w ithin 30 d ays, title in su ran ce an d w arran ty d eed
fu rn ished at closin g, 10% b u yer’s p rem iu m . An n ou n cem en ts
m ad e d ay of sale take p reced en ce over all ad vertisem en t.
Saturday, April 12, 2014
4:30 - 7:00 p.m.
Pleasant Valley Lodge #30
603 N. Main St.
Eat In or Takeout Available
$7 Adults
$4 Children 12 & under
Nick Fowler CAI, Auctioneer # 162
www.FowlerAuctioneers.com
Rea l Es ta te & L iqu id a tio n
Email ~ [email protected]
AUCTION EERS
870-356-4848
KJEP-TV TELEVISION SCHEDULE
www.kjep.tv
FOR LOCAL EVENT
SHOWING TIMES, VISIT:
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Wretched
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Am Gospel Sing Out
America TBA TBA Zoo Flea Market Mania Diaries Zoo Embassy Chefs Diaries Judie First
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Dog & Cat
Byrd Baptist Training Mr. Belvedere
Future
Phenoms Ridgeway Cowboy Baptist Today With God Dan Church Through the Bible Aqua Kids Immanuel
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Sherwood Club Baptist Club Heroes Baptist with Pat Roberson Church with Pat Roberson Horsing
Church Around Spirit Crosstalk with Randy Weiss
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Fest Horseman. Sing Out Marriage Today with Jimmy and Karen Evans
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Finding Your Health with Dr. Richard and Cindy Becker The Cumber‐ Faith In Lands Practice Indiana
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Precepts For New Life
Precepts Cooking
Arbor Baptist Baptist Life‐K. In Jesus For Life Outdoors Jubilee Church Church Arthur Christ Billy God’s View
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Daddy’s Kenny &
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Music Music Row Prof. Agility
Show Sure In the Saddle America
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Roping Gaither Gospel Hour Country’s Machinery Ken
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Family Show Mcnabb Bountiful Rodeo Tour Red Music Reunion Rural Evening News
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Jubilee WKRP in First
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Stuart Hee Haw Cincinnati Baptist PBR / In Jesus Cinc. Church Christ Mary Mary Tyler M. Tyler M. Midwest Country Marty Ridgeway Bob Rural Radio Bob Bob Stuart Baptist Newhart Newhart Newhart Live From Church Newhart Newhart
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1310 S. 4th • Nashville
118 N. Main St. • Nashville • (870) 845-4422
BY
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870-845-1413
6 Community
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
Cheerleaders picked at Dierks
KATELYN COFFMAN
DHS Correspondent
DIERKS - Junior and Senior high Dierks Outlaw
cheerleading tryouts were
held Thurs., March 13 in the
Dierks High School gymnasium. The contestants were
judged on a dance routine,
two cheers, three jumps,
their entrance and exit, and
showmanship, which includes things such as coordination and enthusiasm.
A rating of one through five
was awarded for each category, with one equaling
“needs improvement” and a
five being “superior.”
Of the 17 that tried out
for junior high cheerleader,
10 made it. One of those
was first-time cheerleader,
Abigail Garner.
Garner never participated
in cheer during elementary
school, but has been doing tumbling and gymnastics since she was about
six-years-old and became
passionate about it. In her
later years, she began taking
a class that offered cheer
along with gymnastics. Despite that it was her first
year, Garner was not nervous about trying out.
“I feel good about making
it,” she said. “I think I could
have done better, though. I
knew I had a good chance
because I’ve been practicing
for a really long time, but you
can’t be too confident.”
To her, tryouts were
fun, but she was anxious
to find out who made it.
Garner attributes her success to the amount of time
she put into practicing and
the faith she had in herself.
As for next year, she admits to being semi-nervous
about “messing up” but is
looking forward to simply
cheering.
“I have a feeling it’s going
to be a good year,” she said.
For Meagan Welch, this
is the second year of being
a member of the junior high
cheer squad.
“I’m excited, and I can’t
wait to find out what this
year will bring,” she said,
adding that, for tryouts this
year, she “practiced constantly.”
“Tryouts were very nervewracking. There was a lot of
competition,” she stated.
When Welch was three,
she began watching her
older sister cheer and it motivated her to try out when
the time came.
“I remember thinking
‘I want to do that when I
grow up,” she recalled. She
is already nervous about
whether or not her career
in cheer will continue next
year and is hopeful that she
will be able to get a spot on
the team once again. For
this year, she is most looking
forward to cheer camp and
supporting the Outlaws.
The junior high squad
will attend an NCA camp in
Texarkana June 3-6. They
will compete with other
schools for All American
and to see who has best
mastered cheers and chants.
Adriana Hogg, junior high
cheer coach, stated, “We
will practice hard during
the summer. I expect them
to learn a new routine for
each home football game. I
want them to have awesome
pep-rallies, be leaders in the
school, get the community
and crowd involved in cheering on the team, and showing
Outlaw pride for our junior
high boys.”
Hogg has high hopes for
her group. “I want them to
be united as one team. I
have very high expectations
of them to work hard, keep
their grades up, and to maintain high moral standards,”
KATELYN COFFMAN | Nashville News
The Dierks Outlaws’ 2014-15 cheerleading squad. Front: Alyssa Gibson, Carli Davis, Isabel Fox, Katelynd Fennell, Alyssa
Ward. Back: Mascot Hannah Allen, Kyla Kompkoff, Brittnee Dinger, Adriana Walston, Jessica Hopkins and Breanna Bohon.
she said.
There were also 10 senior
high cheerleaders chosen
for the upcoming year. For
Kyla Kompkoff, this will be
the final year on the squad
before she graduates. She
describes tryouts this year
as, “Just fun. I had fun this
year, and I wasn’t really nervous like all the other years.”
Her hard work and ability
to work well with other people are what she feels helped
her earn her spot. When she
found out she made it, she
was enthusiastic because
it is her final year. However,
she is sad to see her time on
the squad come to an end.
“It’s bittersweet,” she explained.
Kompkoff is most looking
forward to getting familiar
with the newer cheerleaders
and seeing how they were
taught to cheer. As a veteran
of cheer, she feels she has a
responsibility to the team’s
youth.
“I feel like I should teach
them what I know and help
them to lead the underclassmen,” she said.
Hannah Allen, who was
a cheerleader for two years
before becoming the mascot the past two years, will
also be partaking in a bittersweet season next year
as she prepares to graduate
as well. She is taking it well,
though, explaining, “I’m
kind of sad, but I don’t want
to be in high school forever
so it’s got to come to an end
sometime.”
Tryouts for mascot differ
from cheerleading because
the mascot contestants are
required to make up their
own dance, a process that
Allen describes as “fun.” She
decided to try out for mascot
because she wanted to get
to be with her cheerleading
friends, but did not want to
cheer.
She prepped for tryouts
by watching YouTube videos
of other mascots and observing their methods when
she attends college football
games.
This year, she says, “I am
most excited about being
able to do it again because
last year I wasn’t spirited
enough so this year I want to
be more spirited. I want to do
more stuff, like dancing more
at pep rallies and being more
involved at games.”
Like Kompkoff, Allen feels
she in a position to influence
the younger cheerleaders.
“I’m older so being older
I have to watch what I do
because in a way, they look
up to me, and if I’m doing
something I shouldn’t be,
they’ll think it’s cool and
okay to do,” she said.
Isabel Fox and Alyssa Gibson are going to be juniors
next year, which means they
will soon move up in rank
and responsibility. They are
the only two in their grade
who have made it into the
cheer group consecutively
since seventh grade.
Gibson and Fox agree that
they would not have been
chosen this year if it wasn’t
for confidence, devoted
practice, and hard work.
Fox, who has been a
cheerleader since her peewee cheer days in fourth
grade, stated, “Tryouts were
stressful. You just had to put
a lot of time and practice
into it.”
They each had their own
motives for putting forth so
much effort. For Gibson, it
was because cheer-leading
has been a lifelong love of
hers.
“I was one of the little girls
that sat there and watched
the cheerleaders. Once I
started cheering myself, I really liked it,” she elaborated.
The girls are looking forward to next football season.
“I hope our squad keeps
improving,” Gibson said.
“I hope our senior high
cheerleaders are better than
our junior high,” Fox joked,
“and I hope we can cheer our
boys into a great season.”
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SportS 7
Lady Outlaws
fall to Genoa
Central
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
A.J. Smith
Managing Editor
LUKE REEDER | Nashville News
Scrapper catcher Blake Hockaday reaches to catch a low pitch Monday during the Scrappers’ win over Magnet Cove.
maintaining their record
Scrappers still unbeaten after win over Magnet Cove
ChARLES GOODiN
Editor
NASHVILLE - A strong third inning proved to
be all Nashville would need to down Magnet Cove
Monday at Wilson Park.
Both the Scrappers and the Panthers were
scoreless in the first two stanzas of the game,
but Nashville came alive in the third, claiming the
lead with a four run rally that Magnet Cove never
recovered from.
Justin Reed pitched all seven innings in the
contest, giving up just one earned run at the top
of the seventh and allowing only three hits while
striking out nine batters.
Offensively, Nick Myers led the charge for the
Scrappers, going 3-3 from the plate and tallying one
run. Cameron Alexander was close behind with a
1-3 effort that yielded a run and an RBI, while Alex
Curry (1-2) added a run and RBI of his own. Kyler
Lawrence rounded out scoring for Nashville with
a run despite never recording a hit.
Action got underway four pitches into the third
inning, when Curry singled to left field, scoring
Myers. Lawrence reached third on the play, then
scored when Alexander doubled to centerfield.
One play later, Lucas Liggin reached base on an
error, scoring Curry and Alexander.
The Panthers fired back with a run of their own
at the top of the seventh, but the would-be rally
wasn’t enough to overcome the deficit and Nashville claimed an easy victory.
The Scrappers will return to action tonight as
they prepare to host Fouke. Game time is set for
6:30 p.m.
LUKE REEDER | Nashville News
Justin Reed delivers a pitch Monday during the Scrappers’ win over Magnet Cove. Reed
pitched all seven innings and allowed just one earned run while striking out nine batters.
GENOA – The Dierks Lady
Outlaws were edged out by
the Genoa Lady Dragons on
Mon., March 17 with a score
of 3-4.
“It was a tough loss,”
Coach Brad Bray said. “We
were without one of our
better hitters and shortstop,
Lillie Woodruff. The game
could have gone either way.
Once again timely hits were
needed. I’ve got several girls
that have to grow up fast in
the game. There’s not a lot
of experience but they have
come a long way since fall
ball. We are improving but
we’ve got to find a way to
finish strong. Our record is
kinda deceiving - we are a
better team than our record
shows. We just hope to be
hitting on all cylinders when
conference play starts after
spring break.”
Action began in the third
inning with the Lady Outlaws
scoring two runs. Skylar Burgess started off the inning
striking out after a full count.
Madasan Muse was walked.
Stephanie Stuart landed a
solid hit to centerfield. Melanie Kesterson followed with a
hit to centerfield, bringing in
both Muse and Stuart before
being thrown out at third
for the second out. Hailey
Carraway landed a solid hit
to centerfield. Hannah Allen
landed a double. Adrianna
Walston was thrown out at
first after a hit to short stop
to end the inning.
The Lady Outlaws allowed the first two runs from
the Lady Dragons in fourth
inning and again with their
final two runs in the fifth
inning. The Lady Outlaws
scored their last run in the
sixth inning. Allen led off
the inning with a strike out.
Walston followed with a hit
right outfield. Hill followed
with a hit to centerfield that
brought in Walston. Hill was
thrown out at home plate
for the second out. Kyla
Kompkoff was thrown out
at second after Burgess’ hit
for the last out of the inning.
The game continued
scoreless for both teams,
making the final score Lady
Outlaws three to Lady Dragons’ 4. Action will resume
for the Lady Outlaws at the
Spring Hill tournament at
Hope on March 20-22.
Outlaws ease past Knights in 4-3 nailbiter
A.J. Smith
Managing Editor
DIERKS – The Dierks
Outlaws eased by the Centerpoint Knights on Mon.,
March 17 scoring 4-3. “
Caleb Dunn threw well
and after a shaky start, we
cleaned things up,” Coach
Stephen Sprick said. “We are
starting to play better baseball and I think the guys are
starting to see the results of
the work they are putting in.”
The Centerpoint Knights
struck first in the first inning
with one run. Action for the
Outlaws began in the third
inning. Tyler Narens led
the inning with a strike out.
MacLane Moore was walked.
Tyler Kesterson hit down
the third base line making
to first on an error. Andrew
Sirmon followed the same hit
and an error at second kept
him and Kesterson safe on
base. Drew Adams landed a
hit past the pitcher allowing
Moore to make the single
run of the inning. Adams was
thrown out at first for the
second out. Tyler Mounts
hit down the third base line
and was thrown out at first
for the last out.
During the fourth inning
the Outlaws shut down the
Knights while scoring two
more runs. Caleb Dunn led
the inning with a hit past
short stop. Andy Tedder was
walked. Trendin McKinney’s
hit towards first was the first
out for the inning. Narens
batted in Dunn and Tedder
while thrown out at first for
the second out. Moore was
struck out for the last out.
The Knights and Outlaws
scored their final runs in
the fifth inning making the
final score 4-3 in the Outlaws’ favor. Kesterson led
off with a bunt and received
the first out at first. Sirmon
was safe on first on an error
play. Adams hit past second
base. Mounts bunted down
the third base line loading
the bases. Dunn also bunted
down the third base line with
the pitcher throwing out Adams on third for the second
out. Tedder’s hit toward the
pitcher was the last out at
first to end the inning.
The Outlaws will return to
the field on March 20 against
the Ashdown Panthers at
5 p.m.
DEIRDRE DOVE | Nashville News
Tyler Narens backs up Andrew Sirmon as he catches the ball at third base during Monday night’s game against the
Centerpoint Knights.
8 Community
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
Hope man accused
of rape, kidnapping
JONATHAN CANADAY | SW Arkansas Radio
Representatives from the Arkansas Forestry Commission and students with Nashville High School are pictured with
Mayor Billy Ray Jones and Park Director Nikki Cherry Monday during a tree planting event held at the Nashville City
Park in recognition of Arbor Day.
Arkansas Forestry Commission, local
students plant trees in recognition of Arbor Day
NASHVILLE – City Parks in Nashville, Center Point, and Dierks received
trees donated by the Arkansas Forestry Commission (AFC). Local AFC
Rangers, Kenny Fant and John Crump,
as well as AFC Forester, Justin Mallet,
worked yesterday to ensure that trees
were planted with plenty of sunlight
and moisture. Nashville City Park
received Red Bud and Cypress trees.
Center Point City Park received Water
Oak and Nutall Oak trees. This morning, Dierks City Park received Nutall
Oak trees.
“Alongside fire safety, we work to
ensure the conservation and development of new trees in our forests and
civic areas. The trees planted at each
location are just a small way that we
can work with communities to encourage the development and legacy of
Arkansas’s forest health,” said Howard
County Forester, Justin Mallett.
AFC Crews work all over the state
to promote forest health through tree
planting initiatives like these, and
through forestry education. Students
from Nashville High School assisted
crews in placing trees at the Nashville
City Park. Preserving our forests for
future generations takes participation
from everyone. Arbor Day and Earth
Day Celebrations take place throughout March and April to celebrate and
promote the planting of trees in urban
areas like city parks.
The AFC has recorded high wildfire
activity through the beginning of 2014.
AFC Crews are carefully working to
balance the spring planting season,
with constant monitoring of the daily
fire weather forecast. As homeowners
consider outdoor burning during the
primary spring burn season, the following Outdoor Burning Safety Tips
can be helpful:
· Always check current and predicted weather conditions: Humidity
should be above 30%-40% and wind
gusts should be below 5 mph before
you burn.
· Call your local fire department or
AFC crew to find out if conditions are
suitable, and to report your burn. Report large controlled burns to the AFC
Dispatch Center at: 1-800-830-8015.
· Choose a location for your fire
away from structures and urban areas,
away from other flammable vegetation (including dead grass and leaves),
and away from sloped areas.
· Construct a fire break around your
burn site. The fire break should be
carved down to bare soil so that an
actual barrier is created between your
fire and the surrounding vegetation.
· If you are burning trash in a barrel, place a heavy, wired screen over
the top of it.
· Always stay with your fires, never
leave open flames unattended.
· Keep tools such as rakes, shovels,
and a reliable water hose close to
your burn.
· Plan to re-check your burn even
after flames have been extinguished
to look for re-kindling.
Contact the AFC about forest
management plans, controlled burning, or tree recommendations for
your land. Your local AFC contacts
can be reached at: 870-286-2137.
To report a wildfire, or inquire
about wildfire danger, call the AFC
Dispatch Center at 1-800-468-8834.
To report an emergency, dial 911.
Stay updated on AFC updates and
warnings at www.arkfireinfo.org or
facebook.com/ArkansasForestryCommission.
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Howard County
Rabies Vaccination Schedule
Tuesday, March 18
Center Point Square
Mt. Carmel Baptist Church
Dierks City Park
Fellowship Church
1:30-2:20
2:30-2:45
3:30-4:30
4:45-5:00
Center Point
Animal Hospital
Athens Church
Umpire Post Oice
Burg Community Church
Dierks City Park
2:30-2:45
3:00-3:15
3:30-3:45
4:15-5:15
Center Point
Animal Hospital
Tollette 355-332 Jct.
Mineral Springs City Park
3:30-3:45
4:00-5:00
Nashville
Animal Clinic
9:00-12:00
Nashville
Animal Clinic
hursday, March 20
Saturday, March 22
Nashville City Park Dogwood
(Dogwood Pavillion)
he Howard County 4-H Clubs and the Cooperative Extension Service in Cooperation with
the Arkansas Veterinary Medical Association, Howard County Judge and Howard County
Health Nurse is sponsoring this program. he cost will be $9.00 per dog or cat. City Tag License will also be available for $5.00.
HOPE - A local man is facing charges of rape and kidnapping following a domestic incident that occurred
Fri., March 14.
According to a statement issued by Sheriff
James A. Singleton, 23 year
old Zachary Allen was taken into custody Monday
around 8 p.m. following
an investigation into the
alleged assault of a 22 year
old woman.
“On Fri., March 14, Deputy Marla Barnhill was dispatched to 468 Hempstead 5
[in reference to a] domestic
Battery,” Singleton said in
the statement. “Upon arrival
she made contact with the
victim’s mother, who stated
that her 22 year old daughter
came to her home and stated
that Zachary Allen had beat
her up.”
Deputy Barnhill spoke
with the 22 year old victim,
who reportedly stated that
Allen had “beat her up the
night before” and that she
had to wait until he went
to sleep to leave the house,
according to the statement.
The victim then went to a
neighbor’s house and got
them to take her to her mother’s, she said.
“The victim stated that a
friend came and picked her
up around 11:30 p.m. and
took her to Allen’s house and
everything
was fine until the friend
left the
house,” Singleton said.
“The victim
stated that
ALLEN
she was sitting on the bed when Allen
came into room and started
accusing her of cheating on
him. The victim stated Allen
then started hitting her and
forced her to have sex with
him.”
The statement further
alleges that the victim told
police Allen went to the
kitchen and got a knife and
was talking about cutting her
and himself.
“The victim stated she
did talk Zac into giving her
the knife and she then went
to the bathroom, where she
could hear Allen throwing
things like he was looking
for something,” Singleton
continued. “She stated that
when she came out of bathroom Allen started hitting
her with a belt.”
After an investigation
by the Hempstead County
Sheriff’s Office, a warrant
was issued for Allen, resulting in the Monday arrest.
He is currently an inmate
at the Hempstead County
Jail awaiting a first court appearance.
Retired teachers
discuss telephone,
mail scams
The Howard County Retired Teachers met Thurs.,
March 6 at Western Sizzlin’
under the leadership of President Candy Blackwell.
The guest speaker for the
meeting was Bryan McJunkins, chief deputy for the
Howard County Sheriff’s Department. Deputy McJunkins
provided valuable information on ways to keep seniors
safe.
He discussed telephone
and mail scams that have
affected some seniors in
the area. He also provided
tips for keeping safe in our
homes and out in the community.
The next meeting for the
retired teachers is April 10
at Western Sizzlin’. After the
formal meeting, members
will tour the Rick Evans
Grandview Prairie.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public School
Choice Announcement
This is a public announcement. Public School
Choice in Arkansas allows students to attend a public school in a district other than the one in which
they reside. The applications must be made by must
be made by June 1, 2014 to qualify for provisions
under the Arkansas Public School Choice Act of
2013.
Pursuant to standards adopted by a nonresident
district may reserve the right to accept or reject applicants based on capacity of programs, class, grade
level or school building. Likewise, a nonresident
district’s standards may provide for rejection of an
applicant based upon the submission of false or misleading information to the above listed request for
information when that information directly impacts
the legal qualiications of an applicant to transfer
pursuant to the School Choice Act. However, a nonresident district’s standards shall not include an applicant’s previous academic achievement, athletic
or other extracurricular ability, handicapping conditions, English proiciency level, or previous disciplinary proceedings, except that an expulsion from
another district may be included pursuant to Ark.
Code Ann 618510.
Priority will be given to applicants with siblings
attending the district. The nonresident district shall
accept credits toward graduation that were awarded
by another district and award a diploma to a nonresident district’s graduation requirements. Applications postmarked or delivered to the Superintendent of Schools no later than June 1 for a child to be
able to enroll for the fall semester. Transfers shall be
granted on a nondiscriminatory basis. Students who
have been accepted and enrolled in previous years
do not have to reapply as approved transfers remain
valid for as long as the student attends public school.
The following districts comply with this public
school announcement: Ashdown, Caddo Hills, Cossatot River, DeQueen, Dierks, Foreman, Horatio,
Mena, Mineral Springs, Mount Ida, Nashville and
(DQMEC:24,w301)
Ouachita River.
Community 9
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
School continues to debate outsourcing food service
CHARLES GOODIN
Editor
NASHVILLE - School officials continued discussion
on a proposal to outsource
food preparation in the district’s cafeterias during Monday’s school board meeting.
Discussion on the subject was led by food service
supervisor Tina Conzel,
who told board members
she and other staff from
her department had visited
two area schools currently
using the food service company Chartwells to run their
cafeterias. Conzel said the
visits, which were made to
Lakeside and Malvern High
Schools, revealed both advantages and disadvantages
to moving forward with
outsourcing.
Lakeside’s cafeteria featured “lots of choices,” according to Conzel, including
fried chicken, wraps, sandwiches, a salad bar, pizza,
hamburgers, fruit, cookies
and chips, but the food is
not cooked from scratch and
many of the stations are selfserved by students - factors
she characterized as less
than desirable.
Conzel also mentioned
that some staff members
expressed a general sense
of unhappiness with the
company, and many refused
to talk to the visiting group
when a Chartwells manager
was present. Other concerns
expressed by employees
from the Nashville district included worries over whether
the company’s insurance
would provide coverage as
thorough as the school’s and
the loss of accumulated sick
leave and other benefits.
While she never explicitly
stated that she was opposed
to the proposal, Conzel did
imply that her staff would
prefer to remain employees
of the district.
“We don’t want y’all to
give up on us yet,” she said.
Board members took no
action on the subject at Monday’s meeting and discussion was minimal following
Conzel’s presentation.
Roughly 75 percent of
the district’s students eat in
the cafeteria and 69 percent
of all students at the school
qualify for free or reduced
lunches, according to Conzel’s records.
In other business, the
board:
•฀ heard฀ a฀ presentation฀
from High School Principal
Tate Gordon and Junior High
Assistant Principal Jason
Williamson during which
it was recommended that
the school use the free elearning platform Moodle to
administer an online class to
all students entering ninth
grade next year. Act 1280 of
the last legislative session
requires that those students
take at least one online-only
class before graduating. Gordon explained that using the
free program and developing
a curriculum in house would
save the school the $2,500
annual fee and additional
costs per student that would
be incurred if the district
were to use an online course
vendor to supply the class.
•฀heard฀an฀announcement฀
from Superintendent Doug
Graham regarding phase two
of construction work on the
high school campus, bids
for which are expected to be
opened April 1.
•฀heard฀an฀announcement฀
from Graham regarding a
recent visit from the state
department of education
to observe the school’s migrant education program
during which he said state
officials said the district
must increase participation. Roughly 30 students
who qualify for the program
aren’t enrolled in it, Graham
said, and the district will
likely need to hire an additional aide whose salary
will be paid by the migrant
education grant.
•฀ accepted฀ the฀ resignations of coach Don Cooley,
custodian Ruth Lively and
special education instructor
Cameron Allen.
•฀ voted฀ unanimously฀
to employ Bryce Petty as
a technology coordinator
making $22.99 per hour effective April 1.
•฀ voted฀ unanimously฀
to employ Gricelda Maya
(food service), Regina Westfall (high school Spanish),
Kenny Hughes (bus driver),
Amy Turner (elementary
teacher), Abby Cortez (elementary teacher). They
also approved the transfer of
Brian “Boomer” Brown to junior high to replace Cooley.
RAISING FUNDS
CINDY HARDING | Nashville News
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PUBLIC NOTICE
ORDINANCE NO. 2014-5
AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND ORDINANCE NO. 2014-1
THE 2014 HOWARD COUNTY BUDGET ORDINANCE.
BE IT HEREBY ORDAINED BY THE QUORUM COURT OF
HOWARD COUNTY, ARKANSAS:
SECTION 1: The 2014 Howard County Budget Ordinance No. 2014-1 should
be Amended as follows: Howard County needs to anticipate and appropriate
$459.56 into the Howard County- Road Dept.-Parts & Repair (2000-02002023). This unanticipated and unappropriated money comes from December
Invoices-Sales & Use Tax Refund of $249.56 and January Invoices- Sales &
Use Tax Refund of $210.00. Howard County needs to anticipate and appropriate
$2,807.50 into the County Jail- Building Materials & Supplies (3017-04182020). This unanticipated and unappropriated money comes from Gallagher
Bassett-Little Rock for damage to glass in jail cell. Howard County needs to
anticipate and appropriate $110.10 into the County Treasurer- Travel (10000103-3030). This unanticipated and unappropriated money is a reimbursement
for February Treasurers Continuing Education from the Auditor of State. Howard
County needs to anticipate and appropriate $100.00 into the Elections-Other
Professional Services (1000-0109-3009). This unanticipated and unappropriated
money comes from the State Board of Elections-Commission Training for Larry
Dunaway.
SECTION 2: This ordinance is to be in full force and effect from and after its
passage.
Kevin Smith, Howard County Judge
ATTEST:
Brenda Washburn, Howard County Clerk
March 17, 2014
(HCC;23;w214)
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The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
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Consumer Cash
1
28,993
S
Sw Bonus Cash4
-$500
S
28,493
$
7
RICE
EP
AL
19,995
$
7
RICE
EP
AL
$
5,425 in total savings
2013 Chevrolet Silverado
-$1,870
-$1,000
-$1,000
York Gary discount
$
Farm Bureau4
23,865
$
MSRP
$
$
3,870 in total savings
2014 JeeP ComPaSS latitude
1500 ext Cab
2.0L 4 cyl, 6
Speed automatic
transmission, Unconnect with blue
tooth... and more!
3.6L V6 with a 6 speed
automatic, Advanced
safety package including
forward, rear and cross
alert systems, Lane departure warning, Remote
vehicle starter, Heated
front seats, and much
more....
35,565
$
MSRP
8,068
$
York Gary discount
York Gary discount
27,497
$
* 24k mi/24 months free
scheduled maintenance*
S
Farm Bureau4
Consumer Cash
1
-$500
Sw Bonus Cash4
26,997
$
7
RICE
EP
AL
S
T7064
23,785
$
MSRP
8,568 in total savings
$
19,995
$
7
RICE
EP
AL
$
2,040
- 1,000
$
- 750
$
-
$
3,790 in total savings
york
gary
Chevrolet
FIND NEW ROADS.
1420 W. Leslie | Nashville | 845-1536 or 800-235-6855
Pre-oWNed iNveNtory
All pre-owned vehicles listed here have remaining factory warranty! 3 yr/36k bumper to bumper and 5 yr/100k miles
2011
Ford Fusion
2011 Dodge
Ram 2500
2002 Chevy
Silverado
2013 Dodge
Dart SXT
2010 Chevrolet
HHR LT
38k mi, SE Sedan
21k mi., Diesel Crew Cab
92k mil., Impressive!
19k mi., RED!
45k mi., Economy!
13,495 $34,995
$
6,995 $16,495
$
Consumer cash in lieu of 0% apr. **Free 2 year or 24k mi (30k mil GMC) scheduled maintenance
plan allowable to all customers who purchase a Chevrolet Silverado/GMC Sierra, restrictions apply
see dealer for details. Must be a farm bureau member, see dealer for details. Sale price is before
any applicable fees and does not reflect TT&L. Must be owner of business and be willing to provide proof of ownership. Any customer may qualify for additional Incentives such as Farm Bureau,
Business Choice, GM Trade assistance, and incremental customer cash. Please see your sales
person for details.
10,995
$
Consumer cash in lieu of 0% 2. Ram bonus cash is for truck month only during March and compatible
on trucks. 3. Truck Bonus Cash is compatible with consumer cash. 4. Regional 2014 bonus cash and is
compatible with consumer cash. 7. Sale price is after all rebates and before tax, title, licensing, and other applicable fees. 8. Eligible consumers include: active military reserve, retired military (honorably discharged),
and retired military reserve (honorably discharged). Honorably discharged veterans and 100% disabled
veterans are eligible within 12 months of discharge date. *Currently inactive military reserve and all veterans that were honorably discharged (Retired military that were honorably discharged and have 20 years
of service in the military are not eligible for this additional offer). Please see your Dealer for rate and rebate
compatibility
Community 11
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
An April Subscription Special!!!
$10 off In Area and
Out of Area Subscriptions
Offer applies only to annual
subscription rates
(online subscriptions not
included in special).
Call Cindy at
870-845-2010 to renew or
mail in coupon. Subscription not
due now? Renew early to take
advantage of special
his Ofer Good April 1, 2014
through April 30, 2014
Cut Out
And Save!
00
$20
Year
In Howard, Pike, Sevier,
Hempstead & Little River Co.
-------------00
$40
Year
Outside Howard, Pike, Sevier,
Hempstead & Little River Co.
104 ISSUES
Name
Address
City
Phone Number
CUT OUT & MAIL TO:
P.O. Box 297
Nashville, AR 71852
418 N. Main • P.O. Box 297 • Nashville, AR 71852
Toll Free (888) 845-NEWS • (870) 845-2010
Charge it to your Visa,
MasterCard, American
Express
12 Community
GROUP
From Page 1
ought to be one of the requirements before somebody gets on city services
is that they be in the city
limits,” he said. “The overall
running of the city, the services, the fire department,
animal control, the police
department - those are the
reasons we are trying to do
this. It would just make our
city run better.”
MOTTA
From Page 1
fect in June. The committee
refused to accept the resignation, with members saying that many things could
happen between now and
June, and that Motta could
re-submit his resignation at
that time if he still felt that
he should.
TOLLETTE
From Page 1
water for more than three
months, was addressed
Tuesday, according to
Brown. He also reported that
a leak near the town hall was
repaired Wednesday.
Brown then said that
the water seepage that had
generated the most complaints, on property owned
by Charles Henry “Peter
Gun” Johnson, may be beyond the town’s ability to
fix. He stated that the water
coming up from the ground
had tested negative for both
chlorine treatment and sewage, making it unlikely that it
was from town sources.
Brown stated that he
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.swarkansasnews.com | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
Although he is still in
favor of the proposal, Jones
said he would not continue
to pursue the move without
the support of the city council and remained dispassionate about whether or not
the annexation ultimately
passes.
“It’s not gonna be a make
or break thing for me if it
doesn’t,” he said. “I’m not
gonna sit here and make a
big stink over it. If the council
does not support it and does
not want to do it, that’s not a
big deal to me.”
AGRI ED
The Hempstead County
Master Gardeners will sponsor a gardening seminar
Tues., April 1 from 6-9 p.m. at
the Southwest Research and
Extension Center (Experiment Center) at Hope.
Janet Carson, University
of Arkansas Extension Horticulture Specialist from Little
Rock, will be presenting
classes on gardening in a
changing climate and low
maintenance beautiful landscapes.
There will be door prizes
and homemade sweets and
treats. Parties interested
in attending the event may
register early for a $10 fee by
calling 870-777-5771, or pay
$15 at the door. Doors open
at 5:30 pm.
For more information,
contact Gary Martin at 870703-1820 or at [email protected]
Motta said he hopes to
return to the area when
his responsibilities in other
parts of the United States
have come to a close, and
reflected fondly on his time
in Howard County.
“Having had a choice on
where to raise my family, I
chose Nashville, Arkansas,”
he said. “If things were still
within my power or control,
I would choose to stay here
and continue to raise my
family here.”
worked on that seepage over
the weekend. Given that
he was not able to find the
source quickly, he felt that
it could possibly be either
a natural upwelling or seepage from local surface water.
The seepage is of concern,
because it is close to a day
care facility owned by Helen
Ruth Johnson.
Brown also reported that
he had been contacted by
the state health department
over the matter, and was cooperating with them. Brown
apologized to the residents
of the town for the delays
in repairing the leaks, saying that he is the sole town
employee for both the water
and streets departments
(though he does hire help
on an ad hoc basis as able),
and has just been unable to
keep up with needs.
Church to
host black
history
program
A.J. SMITH | Nashville News
Kaylin Capps holds a recently hatched baby chicken that was a part of the Farm Bureau
classroom incubator program for Nashville ABC. Approximately 160 students total
got to see the newly hatched chicks as a part of their study unit on farms.
"Juniors"
1
1 Jeans material
2
3
4
5
6
8
9
10
11
15
14
6 Work on the turkey
7
17
12
13
16
HELP WANTED
21
20
14 Actress Christensen
15 Pale
22
24
16 Before, in poems
26
17 Hollywood starlet
of the 1940s and
1950s
27
23
25
28
29
30
31
34
33
36
32
35
37
38
19 Falsehood
20 Solid ___ rock
39
21 Leaves out
42
40
41
44
43
22 Lazy person
45
46
24 Balloon sounds
47
25 "My goodness!"
48
49
50
51
26 Some Louisianans
54
55
29 Scoundrel
58
59
60
61
62
63
33 School tests
56
52
57
34 Quackers
35 Ending for Cray or
pay
36 Not firm
59 Academy Award
10 Joins the military
38 Hearts or spades
37 Greets from a
distance
60 Say under your
breath
11 Bakery buys
40 Find work
38 Slender
61 Bank convenience
12 One of the Great
Lakes
41 Most police
officers carry one
39 Mauna ___, Hawaii
62 Necklace
components
13 Schlitz or Heineken
43 Young fellow
18 Baseball strike
callers, for short
44 Oven for potters
40 Having a protective
barrier
63 Requires
41 Tom of "Amadeus"
23 One-seventh of a
week
Down
42 Gave a grin to
STATEWIDE CLASSIFIEDS
Call Eva or Linda at 1-800-569-8762 to place your ad here!
19
18
11 One of the Bushes
46 Names mentioned
in a will
47 ___ steep price
44 Kind of roll
1 ___ vu
24 Gas station feature
48 Civil disturbance
45 Meowing pets
2 Historical times
25 Bothers
49 Gym type
46 Clue
3 One of Columbus's
ships
26 Microscopic units
50 Apple tablet
27 Saying
51 Short letter
28 Alcohol from the
Caribbean
52 Mimicked
47 "The Devil Wears
___"
4 Pres. Eisenhower
49 Triangular road
sign
5 Strands on an
island
51 "I don't think so"
6 Foundation
54 Hot ___ (empty
talk)
7 Helper: abbr.
8 "___ the One"
(Bruce Springsteen
song)
55 Sidewalk activity
58 Not me
29 Comfy blanket
30 ___ coffee
31 Wonderland girl
32 Lion ___
34 Facts
37 Handfuls of cash
9 ___ no.
53 His and ___
56 "What's the ___?"
57 Highway: abbr.
Answers on
Pg. 3
HARMONY
GROVE
Can
You Dig
It? SCHOOL
Bulldozers,
DISTRICTBackhoes,
and CAMDEN
Excavators. 3
Weeks
Hands
On Training
is accepting
applications
for Prothe
vided.
Become
Nationally
Cerfollowing
teaching
positions.
tified. Lifetime Job Placement
K-12 PrincipalGI• LEA
Supervisor
Assistance.
Bill
Eligible.
Special Education • Social Studies
1-866-362-6497.
Coordinator
P/T:
Provide
supSecondary Math
• Librarian
(7-12)
port and
activities• Business
for high school
Agriculture
exchange
students.
Secondary
English • ArtVolunteer
K-12
hosts also needed. Apply online:
Applications
available @
www.AspectFoundation.com
hgsd1.com
HOLTGER
BROS.,
INC.
or Superintendent’s
office
UTILITY
CONTRACTOR
870-574-0971.
Accepting thru 4/01/14. EOE.
53
HELP WANTED
Immediate
Opportunities
in
Can
You Dig
It? Bulldozers,
the Telephone
for: 3
Backhoes,
and Industry
Excavators.
Weeks• Aerial
HandsTechnicians
On Training Provided.
Become
Nationally
Cer• Cable
Plow/Bore
Operators
tified. Lifetime
Job Placement
• Foremen
Assistance.
Bill Eligible.
• CDLGILaborers
1-866-362-6497.
Training Offered. Travel
Coordinator P/T: Provide supRequired for All Positions.
port and activities for high school
www.holtger.com
exchange
students. Volunteer
Call 501-410-0209
| EOEonline:
by AA
hosts
also needed. Apply
www.AspectFoundation.com
HOLTGER
BROS., INC.
MOLD
BUILDER-REPAIR
UTILITY
CONTRACTOR
Build
and repair
molds. Assist in
die building and repairing. Assist in
plant and equipment maintenance
and repairs. Three years minimum
Immediate
Opportunities
in
experience. $18.72
per hour to
the
Telephone
for:
start.
RelocationIndustry
Negotiable.
• Aerial
Apply inTechnicians
person at:
• Cable Plow/Bore Operators
Hoffi•nger
Industries,
Foremen
315 N. Sebastian,
West Helena,
• CDL Laborers
Ar 72390.Offered.
Fax resume
to:
Training
Travel
Required
for All
870-572-9711
orPositions.
email to:
[email protected]
www.holtger.com
Call 501-410-0209 | EOE by AA
com
HELP WANTED TRUCK DRIVERS
DRIVERS- Train to be a PROFESSIONAL TRUCK DRIVER
through Prime's Student Driver
Program. Obtain your Commercial Driver's License, then get
paid while training! 1-800-2770212.
www.DriveForPrime.com
Sudoku Puzzle #3207-D
2
4
1
3
4
2
9
7
2
© 2009 Hometown Content
St. John C.M.E. Church
on Jordan road in Nashville
invites you to an “Our Black
History” program scheduled
for Sun., April 13 at 2:30 p.m.
The speaker is Margrette
Cooper of First Providence
Outreach in Nashville.
Week of 03-17-14
Across
3
6
Gardening
seminar
scheduled
in Hope
7
5
6
3
5
4
8
2
9
4
8
3
9
1
1
6
4
Difficult
- Driver pay .37 cpm for Van Division
and .40 cpm for Flatbed
- Sign on BONUS - Referral Pay
- 1 day home for every 6 days out
- Rider and Pet Policy
Apply ONLINE at
www.woodfieldinc.com
CALL 800-501-6020 x 13 for a RECRUITER
ask
about
our chip
division
Make OUR Home YOUR Home!
DRIVERS- Tango offers up to
$.42 cpm to start plus home most
weekends. Family Medical/Dental, 401k, Paid Vacation. CDL-A
w/1 yr OTR req'd. 877-826-4605.
www.DriveForTango.com.
DRIVERS- REGIONAL CDL-A
DRIVERS Great Career w/weekly
hometime! 888-362-8608. For paid
training, apply online at
AverittCareers.com.
Equal Opportunity Employer - Females, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities
are encouraged to apply.
NOW HIRING
SHORT HAUL DRIVERS
For trucking company located
in SW Arkansas. Some overnight.
Sign on Bonus after 6 mos.!
Call 870-887-0800
COMPANY DRIVERS & OWNER
OPERATORS WANTED! No touch
freight, 90% drop & hook, dedicated opportunities available. Call 888-710-8707
Also seeking Recent Grads
Call Lavonna 877-440-7890
Apply online: www.driveforpamtransport.com
Attn: Drivers 24/7 Support!
$$$ Up to 50 cpm $$$
Full Benefits + Pet & Rider
CDL A Req.
877-258-8782
www.Ad-Drivers.com
NOW HIRING
SHORT HAUL DRIVERS
DRIVERSCDL-A
SOLOlocated
& TEAM
For trucking
company
DRIVERS NEEDED. Top Pay for
in SW Arkansas.
overnight.
Hazmat.
OTR &Some
Regional
Runs.
SignGrads
on Bonus
after
6 mos.!
CDL
Welcome.
700+
Trucks
& Growing!
Call888-928-6011.
870-887-0800
www.Drive4Total.com
MISCELLANEOUS
DRIVERS- DRIVE THE BEST.
DRIVE MAVERICK! NOW HIRING
IN YOUR AREA!! OTR, regional &
dedicated. Exp drivers or students
with Class A-CDL for training. New
student spots just opened. Great
pay & home time. Flatbed, glass,
and reefer. Must be 21 yrs old & hold
Class A-CDL. 1-800-289-1100.
www.DriveMaverick.com
DRIVERS- Need Contract Drivers,
CDL A or B to transfer commercial
vehicles to and from various locations throughout U.S. - OTR - No
forced dispatch - Drivers choice. Apply online at
www.MamoTransportation.com
under Careers or call 1-800-5013783 to speak with a recruiter.
MISCELLANEOUS
LIVE LINKS- Meet singles right
now! No paid operator, just real
people like you. Browse greetings, exchange message and
connect live Try it free. Call
1-877-939-9299.
WANTED ONLY 5 MORE HOMES
to advertise Siding, Windows or
Roofs for upcoming brochure.
Save hundreds of dollars. No
money down EZ financing. Home
owners only. 1-866-668-8681
Dish TV Retailer - SAVE!
Starting $19.99/month (for
12 months.) FREE Premium
Movie Channels. FREE
Equipment, Installation &
Activation. CALL, COMPARE
LOCAL DEALS!
1-800-278-8081
REDUCE YOUR CABLE BILL!
Get a whole-home Satellite
system installed at NO COST
and programming starting
at $19.99/mo. FREE HD/DVR
Upgrade to new callers.
CALL NOW 1-800-474-0423
FOR SALE
For Sale- 4ct. tw NovaBright DiamondExcel Stud Earrings $4.95 SH
for the look of $20,000.00 Earrings.
1-800-613-7231 or ihsfreeearrings.
com Offer Code: K2075.
TRAINING/EDUCATION
Medical Billing Trainees
Needed! Become a Medical
Office Assistant now!
Online job training gets you job
ready. Job placement when
program completed. Call ACC
for details. HS Diploma/GED
needed. 1-888-734-6717.
Become a TRUCK
DRIVER IN LESS THAN
30 DAYS!!
Tuition Reimbursement
Available if Qualified!
Classes Start
Every Monday!
• Financing Avail.
• Lodging Provided!
PINE BLUFF TRUCK DRIVING
SCHOOL, INC.
CALL TODAY!
1-800-954-4981
www.pbtds.net
The RIGHT TRAINING for today’s trucking industry
lic. by ASBPCE
MOBILE/
MANUFACTURED
HOMES
Mobile Homes with acreage.
Ready to move in. Seller Financing
(subject to credit approval). 3Br 2Ba.
No renters. 501-588-3300.
www.VMFHomes.com
MAX YOUR TAX REFUND UP TO
$8,000! CALL 870-862-4305
For details
REPO DOUBLEWIDE AND SINGLEWIDES AVAILABLE!! Must Sell.
Call 870 - 862-4305 for details.
Classifieds 13
Thursday, March 20, 2014 | The Nashville News | Online at http://www.swarkansasnews.com | Call: 1-888-845-6397
Nashville N
COMBINATION
CLASSIFIEDS
Murfreesboro
Diamond
NEWS
Reach over 4,500 readers! Call 1-888-845-6397 to place your ad today!
** Call The Nashville News (870) 845-2010 or The Murfreesboro Diamond (870) 285-2723 for rates, dates or questions **
We strive for accuracy,
though occasionally errors do occur. Please
notify us immediately if
your ad has a mistake in
it, so that we may correct it and give you a
free rerun for the irst
day that it ran incorrectly. Mistakes not brought
to our attention before
the second printing of the
ad are eligible for one free
corrected ad only!
For more information
and assistance regarding
the investigation of inancing or business opportunities, he Nashville News urges our
readers to contact the
Better Business Bureau
of Arkansas, 12521 Cannis Rd., Little Rock, AR
72211 or phone (501)
665-7274 or 1-800-4828448.
✁ERCHANDISE
ELECTRIC WHEELCHAIR, portable, lightweight, like new. Low
$ or perhaps free to senior. (888)
442-3390.
(WG:10-tf, w14)
___________________________
AU TOS
2002 Jeep Wrangler, 6 cyl. Auto,
Air, CD, Hard Top, Chrome
Wheels, New Tires, Extras, 79,000
Miles. $8,500. 870-845-4456.
(PD:22-23)
___________________________
❲
ELP
ANTED
Manpower has immediate opening
for Part time position, reworking
parts in Nashville ,AR Call 870
-777-0365.
(MT:22-23, w15)
___________________________
FOR
♦
ENT
Furnished apartments for rent,
utilities paid, 1403 S. Main, two
blocks from Tyson, call Hal Scroggins, 845-1691.
(tf)
___________________________
Peach Tree Trailer Park, 2 and 3
bedrooms, furnished, conveniently
located laundry. 845-1355 or 8452943.
(PT:18-tf, w15)
___________________________
Murfreesboro Mini Storage and
Maxi Storage. 845-1870 or 8453168.
(GS:tf, w9)
___________________________
2 & 3 BR trailers for rent. (870)
845-2940.
(SBMH:62-tf; w8)
___________________________
Apartments for rent. (870) 4513940.
(DCL:tf, w4)
___________________________
Modern brick apartments for rent,
contact he Agency, 845-1011.
(CA:tf, w11)
___________________________
2 BR, 1 BA, Brick House, w/carport, Central H/AC, Dishwasher,
W/S Connections, Remodeled
in 2013. Centrally located near
schools. $650/deposit - $650/
month rent. 870-557-1955.
(CU:94-tf, 25)
___________________________
APARTMENTS FOR RENT: Recently remodeled 2 BR Apartments
in Delight, $400/month, $300/
deposit, includes range, refrigerator, water, sewer and trash pickup.
CALL 501-844-7137 OR 501-3376788 for Application.
(MI:23-34, w26)
___________________________
REAL
ESTATE
3 or 6 ac. lots, city water, Hwy 26W,
owner inancing. (501) 758-2303.
(CL:74-tf; w13)
___________________________
Carlton
SANDY BRANCH
MOBILE HOMES
We have your mobile home needs.
SALES, SERVICE, RENTAL & MOVING
Financing Available! 8:00-5:00
(870) 845-2940
Buyer of TimBer & TimBerland
Matt Tollett - (870) 703-6939
Johnny Porter - (870) 777-3774
P.O. Box 1316
Hope, AR 71802
ANUFACTURED
OMES
MUST SELL! 3/2 tape and textured
set up on 1 acre. 30 yrs at 4.75%
for $467.63. Call 24 hours! (903)
831-4540.
(SH:99-tf, w21)
___________________________
SINGLE PARENT AND FIRST
TIME HOME BUYERS. Special inancing for low down and monthly
payments. Call anytime! (903) 8317324.
(SH:99-tf; w18)
___________________________
Bad or good credit! You own land,
we can inance you on any home.
Call 24 hrs. (903) 831-5332.
(SH:99-tf; w18)
___________________________
ABANDONED 3/2 with land.
Must sell! Call 25 hrs. (903) 8316412.
(SH:99-tf; w10)
___________________________
FAR M
Angus Bulls for January Service.
(870) 451-4189.
(mg:tf)
___________________________
Breeder Chicken house farm. 870642-3049.
(VM:33-tf, w5)
___________________________
Automated Hen Houses. Tyson
Contract. Incentive Contract. 870557-2822.
(PD:17-24)
___________________________
OTICE
B U SINESS
❙ERVICES
Jimmy Don Sullivan Welding &
Construction Service, 845-4752,
licensed septic tank installation.
(JDS:tf; w12)
___________________________
he Terminator Pest Control (870)
557-1780.
(tf)
___________________________
Hostetler Mowing - dependable
lawn care. (870) 557-4510.
(RH:20-tf; w6)
___________________________
Ward Shavings LLC - dry shavings
$1,500/van load. (870) 285-3377.
(WS:89-tf; w9)
___________________________
Brazil’s Full Service Center &
Detail. For all your car care needs!
Why shine when you can sparkle.
805 S. Main, right beside Hickory
House. Call us at 870-557-7739.
(mg:tfn)
___________________________
Harris Construction-New, Add on,
Porches, Decks, Etc. References
Available. 870-200-1727.
(mg-tfn)
___________________________
Smith’s Mini Storage
Looking for scrap metal, small
amounts OK. Call (870) 557-0838.
(dj:tf)
___________________________
• Residential
YOUNG
• Commercial
ELECTRIC
• Industrial
Steve Young, Owner
Licensed,
870-845-2643
Bonded
870-845-7092
& Insured
1917 CR 342 • Nashville, AR 71852
Units available in
Nashville & Mineral Springs
(870) 845-5075
Jason Porter RF#987
Ofice:
800-647-6455
Summer Job Openings at
Crater of Diamonds State Park
Crater of Diamonds State Park is now taking
applications for the upcoming summer season.
Open positions include cashier, lifeguard, restaurant
staff, and maintenance worker.
A summer job at Crater of Diamonds State Park
isn’t just a paycheck. It will provide valuable job
experience and professional skills that can beneit
any career!
• Strengthen communication skills as you greet
and serve people from all over the country and
around the world!
• Learn about the history and geology of this oneof-a-kind park!
• Become part of a welcoming, dedicated park
staff team as you share knowledge and provide
visitors with a positive park experience!
• Make friends and memories for a lifetime!
• See real diamonds, meet the people who ind
them, and learn how you can ind your own!
No job experience necessary, but applicants should
be friendly, hard-working, and honest. Applications
may be picked up at Crater of Diamonds State Park,
209 State Park Road, in Murfreesboro. More info/
comments, call 870-285-3113.
All applications are due back at the park no later
than Friday, March 28, 2014.
EOE/AA/ADA
3 Bedroom, 3 Bath, Approx. 2,640 sq. ft.,
Spacious kitchen with lots of cabinets. Two living
areas, one features wood burning ireplace with
gas starter and beamed ceiling. Home also has
formal dining and a separate ofice. Master bath
features jetted tub, separate walk in shower and
great counter space with double sinks. Located
at 804 N. 14th St................ Listed at $149,500
Call our ofice to view this property
www.rayandassociates.net Call for your personal tour today!
Ray & Associates Real Estate
724 S. Main St., Nashville • (870) 845-2900
Terry Ray 845-7757 • Dale Bennett 557-6597
Laurie Westfall 584-7926 • Carolyn Reed 200-0201
RESIDENT MANAGER
CARETAKER TEAM NEEDED
Little Rock Management Company is seeking a Resident
Manager and a Caretaker Team for a Family community
in Murfreesboro, Arkansas totaling 19 units. Must be
professional, outgoing, energetic, and capable of performing
duties unsupervised on a day to day basis. Experience in
Property Management, Rural Development is preferred
but not required. MUST BE BONDED ON CREDIT
HISTORY AND WILLING TO RESIDE ON PROPERTY.
Compensation package includes: rent/utility free 2 bedroom
Apartment along with a monthly Salary. Duties include:
leasing apartments, collecting rents, bookkeeping, general
maintenance, rehabbing/cleaning units, and yard care
duties. Send letters or resumes with references to PEARLIE
KIDD, Site Manager Specialist, 1501 N. University Ave.,
Suite 740, Little Rock, Arkansas 72207, or e-mail
to [email protected], or fax to 501663-7671.
Equal Opportunity Employer.
Charles’ Tree Service
870-557-1003
Tree trimming • Tree Removal
Professional Tree Service
Bucket Trucks
Fully insured for all your tree
trimming needs Free Estimates
and years experience.
Countryside
nursery
IRRIGATION SYSTEMS,
LAWN CARE, LANDSCAPING
AND STUMP GRINDING
Mini Storage
(870) 845-3560
MILLWOOD CORPORATION
J.K. Porter
▼ ❍
Now buying good usable pallets 40
inches wide X 48 inches long $2.00
each delivered to Ward Shavings
LLC 870-285-3377.
(WS:82-tf, w20)
___________________________
LOOK GOOD...... FEEL BETTER!!! Cancer Survivors. For
more information contact: 870845-2759 or 870-557-1444. (tf)
___________________________
219 N. 2nd St.
PO Box 903
Nashville, AR 71852
Ofice 870-845-5303
LARRY R. TEAGUE, CIC
Fax 870-845-1764
PARTNER
www.teagueandteague.com
HOME • LIFE • AUTO
[email protected]
The Nashville School district is seeking
applications for a Migrant Education aide.
Applicant must meet Department of Education requirements by having 60 hours
of college credit or have passed the Para
Pro Test. This position will be paid at the
same level as other para-pros in the district. Spanish is preferred but not required.
Apply at the Nashville School District Administration Building or by mail to Nashville School District, 600 North 4th Street,
Nashville, AR 71852. Applications will be
accepted until the position is illed.
3 temporary sugarcane workers needed by Lane A.
Blanchard Farms, New Iberia, LA 04/01/14 to 01/15/15.
Workers will perform duties associated with tractor
driving, ield prep, water maint, fertilizing, plant &
harvest of crops which includes manual shovel work
& hoeing of weeds, spot spraying treatments & general
farm labor. Repair & maintain equip, farm, ield, levees,
roads and shop. Load and unload trucks. Must be able
to lift & carry in excess of 70lbs. Must have 3 mos prior
experience. Workers will receive $9.87/hr as stipulated
by the USDOL. Free housing will be provided to workers
who live outside the area of intended employment.
Transportation & subsistence costs to the place of
employment will be reimbursed to anyone who lives
outside area of intended employment upon completion
of 50% of the work contract, or earlier if appropriate.
Transportation to & from worksite will be provided by
the employer for worker who lives in housing provided
by the employer. Worker will be guaranteed ¾’s of the
hours speciied in the work contract. Tools, supplies, &
necessary equipment will be provided at no cost to the
worker. For further information & to make application,
contact SWA at 700 Elm, Hope, AR 71801; Ph: 870-7773421; JO# LA477627.
Shrubs & Trees
(wide assortment)
INSURED
(870) 845-2307
198 MURRAY LANE
Off Hwy 278 W, toward Center Point
Needing paper for crafting
projects or packing?
Stop by or call
The Nashville News and check out
our specials on end rolls today!
870-845-2010
870-845-2010
Send yours to: [email protected]
14
The Nashville News | Online at http://www.nashvillenews.org | Call: 1-888-845-6397 | Thursday, March 20, 2014
special olympics contenders
A.J. SMITH | Nashville News
The Howard County Children’s Center’s Bulldog basketball team, composed of David Wynn, Jami Strong, Carrie Rand,
Melissa Hinson, Billy Roach, Perry Carr, Boone McJunkins, Randy Martin, Chris Clark, Scott Wilson, and Tyler Foster, is
pictured with Coaches Shannon Weaver, Brandi Cox and Christy Fike. The team competed in the Special Olympics Area
Basketball Tournament, winning gold on March 5. They qualified to go to the state tournament, held March 14 and 15 at
Russellville High School. The Bulldogs came in fifth. According to Assistant Director Rose Ray, staff and clients are very
proud of their accomplishments and are thankful for the coaches that work with the clients to get them ready for these
events. They will now begin to practice on boche ball and will be competing in this event in the near future. Anyone who
would like to know more about the Howard County Children’s Center Special Olympic teams and events, or who wishes
to donate to the cause, is urged to call 870-845-1211.
Blevins archery teams headed to national tournament
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D&J Equipment &
Rental Inc.
1032 W. Sypert St. • Nashville, AR 71852
870-845-2489
Blevins Elementary and
Middle School Archery
Teams competed in the Arkansas National Archery in
the Schools Program Tournament this past weekend
in Hot Springs and qualified
for the national archery
tournament to be held in
Louisville, Kentucky the
weekend of May 8-10. The
elementary team qualified
and competed last year in
the national and world tournaments. This is the first
year for the middle school
team to qualify.
Sixth grader Michele
Couch was the highest elementary girl shooter in the
state tournament. Couch
scored 276 out of a possible
300 points and led all the
girls through the team shooting. After a shoot off, Couch
finished in fourth place in the
state tournament.
The archers will be involved in fund raisers to assist with trip expenses. Donations will be gladly accepted and appreciated. For
more information, contact
Coach Claudette Harris at
Blevins Elementary School
at 870-874-2283.
SUBMITTED PHOTO | Nashville News
The Blevins Middle School Archery Team includes (front) Kindell Woods, Madison Huskey,
Candiss Hardy, Damian Cantu, Landen Greene, Bodhi Couch, Kasey Jester, Corta’ Young,
(back) Blake Lucas, Blair Lucas, Saloura Muresan, Monti Todd, Bailey Lee, Kaitlin Lee, Ally
Fincher, Dylan Fulton and Nic Hickey.
SUBMITTED PHOTO | Nashville News
Laurie WESTFALL
The Blevins Elementary Archery Team includes Donavan Langston, Joshua Highlander,
Isabella Jones, Daisy Smith, Caleb Cox, Jordan Myrick, Cannon Hudman, Amy Tucker, Jonah
Graham, Daniel Hill, Katelyn Wilson, Jose Hernandez, Donavan Mavis, Abby Tompkins,
Juliet Adams, Kelsey Torres, Casia Morrison, Alex Jones, Michele Couch, Justin Triplett,
Brett Banister, David Franks, Mackenzie Oller and Karcee Bonner.
Howard County Circuit Clerk
May 20, 2014
Trimmers • Blowers • Chainsaws
5 year consumer warranty
D & J Equipment &
Rental, INC.
“I want to be your next Circuit Clerk. With my six years (6) as the
elected Circuit Clerk of Sevier County plus an additional two (2)
years as Deputy Circuit Clerk, I am well qualiied and capable of
doing the very best job. Known as a proven leader, I am professional,
dependable, compassionate and truly enjoy working with the public.
It would be a privilege and honor to serve the residents of Howard
County as your Circuit Clerk. I want the opportunity to serve in this
capacity and would appreciate your vote and support in the May
paid political ad
20th Democratic Primary election.”
1032 W. Sypert St.
Nashville, AR. 71852
870-845-2489
www.ECHO-USA.com
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