PLTW ELEMENTARY

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Project Lead The Way
PLTW ELEMENTARY
1
percent of
scientists and
graduate students
in a 2010 study
stated that their
interest in science
began before middle
school
2
Agenda - PLTW elementary discussion
• Proven PLTW model
• What makes a PLTW classroom different?
• A closer look:
– Curriculum
– Professional Development
– Network
3
Proven PLTW model
4
Proven PLTW model
5
Proven PLTW model
6
It all comes together in a PLTW
classroom
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What makes a PLTW classroom different?
Content
Teacher
Student
8
What makes a PLTW classroom different?
PLTW classrooms:
• Launch critical thinking
• Challenge students to make mistakes
• Integrate technology in the classroom
• Encourage teachers and students to learn
together
9
A closer look at the PLTW model in
elementary
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World-class curriculum
• Activity, project, problem-based
• Aligned to Common Core Math and English State
Standards and Next Generation Science Standards
• Allows for flexibility and customization
– Designed for Kindergarten to 5th grade
– Four modules per grade. Each module is ~10 hours
• First module of each grade focuses on the design
process
• Integrates formative and summative assessments
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What makes a PLTW classroom different?
The Design Process
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Design process for every age
Design
Process K-5
What it looks like & means K-2
What it looks like & means 3-5
Ask
Students ask questions, make observations and
gather information to define a simple problem.
Students define a simple design problem including
specified criteria and constraints.
Explore
Students develop simple drawings to generate ideas
of how to solve the given problem.
Students generate and compare multiple possible
solutions.
Model
Students develop a simple sketch to illustrate how
the chosen concept will function to solve the given
problem and develop a simple physical model.
Students develop a solution to a problem based on how
well each is likely to meet the criteria and constraints of
the problem and construct a prototype.
Evaluate
Students analyze data from tests of two objects and
compare strengths and weaknesses of how each
performs.
Students plan and carry out fair tests in which variables
are controlled. Students consider failure points of data
collected to identify aspects of the design solution that
can be improved.
Explain
Students reflect on their design solution including
one or two suggestions for improvement.
Students communicate their design solution including
specific suggestions for improvement.
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PLTW elementary pilot modules
Working title
Standards alignment
• Structure and Function
Kindergarten
• Pushes and Pulls
Kindergarten
• Waves: Light and Sound
1st grade
• Observing the Earth, Sun, Moon, and Stars
1st grade
• Matter and Materials Science
2nd grade
• Engineering Design: Dispersing Seeds
2nd grade
• Motion and Stability: Science of Flight
3rd grade
• Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
3rd grade
• Energy: Collisions
4th grade
• Energy: Conversion
4th grade
• Robotics: The Power of Automation
5th grade
• Robotics: Challenge
5th grade
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Animal rescue activity
Aligned to 3rd grade standards
15
Paintbrush design activity
Aligned to Kindergarten standards
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Proven PLTW model
17
High-quality professional development
PLTW three-phased approach fully supports elementary STEM
teachers:
Readiness Training
–
–
On-demand and live-online
Focus on core knowledge/skill
Core Training
–
–
2.5 days in-person training for the program
Focus on pedagogy and activity, project, problem-based learning
Ongoing Training
–
–
On-demand and live online by module
Focus on pedagogical-content knowledge by module
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Scalable, school-wide model for
elementary core training
Trainers
PLTW
Master
Teachers
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Lead
Teachers
PLTW
Teachers
Proven PLTW model
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Join the PLTW network and get involved
• Check back on http://www.pltw.org/elementary to
follow the PLTW Elementary pilot and learn
program updates
• Registration for Fall 2014 opens November 1, 2013
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APPENDIX
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FAQs
•
•
•
Can we use any type of tablet? How many do I neeed?
– iPads support the curriculum, and the pilot is using iPads. Other tablets are
being considered for the future, but what we know now is that iPads work.
– Classroom set; recommended (not required) ratio of students : iPad is 2:1
Does my elementary school need WiFi?
– Yes.
Will students be on the LMS?
– Yes. Students will be in the LMS. (ot just teachers rostering them or accessing
parts of the curriculum on their behalf)
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FAQs: Assessment
How does assessment match up to GTT and/or PTT assessment models –is it same?
PLTW will support a balanced assessment approach for all programs integrating both formative and summative
assessments.
What’s the benefit for the teacher/school in PLTW’s assessment approach?
•
Frequent opportunities for student self-reflection on their own learning
•
Opportunities for individualized teacher feedback to students
•
Optional formative pretests and summative posttests (Balanced Assessment)
•
Rubrics and reflective checklists in engineering notebook for engineering design challenges
•
Examples of classroom assessments and checks for understanding
•
Essential questions embedded in curriculum to stimulate discussion and reflection
What’s the benefit for the student?
•
The benefit is that students are actively involved in their own learning. Throughout the modules, students
are given the opportunity to reflect on their learning, what they know, what they don’t know and what
they will still have the opportunity to learn. They will receive guidance from their teachers to help direct
their unique approach to problem solving during the design challenges.
•
Whether they decide to pursue further STEM learning opportunities, they will be better equipped to think
about their own role in their learning, and how to solve problems in creative, yet systematic ways.
•
Students are engaged in their own learning process
•
Builds metacognitive skills
•
Students receive frequent and personalized feedback from instructors
•
Opportunity to apply knowledge and skills in real-life situations
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FAQs: Assessment
What does Formative Assessment look like at the elementary level?
PLTW supports a comprehensive formative assessment approach to its elementary
programs. First, students are taught relevant science content needed to solve a design
problem. The curriculum provides formative assessment activities that teachers can use to
monitor students understanding and mastery of those key concepts. These strategies may
include simple assessments directly tied to the knowledge and skills of the course,
classroom observations, and opportunities for students to assess their own knowledge
related to the topic. Second, as students participate in the design challenges they are given
the opportunity for self-reflection along every step of the design process. Students identify
what they are doing well and what they need help with; the teacher is given the opportunity
to provide individualize feedback and direction to each student through classroom
interactions and through personalized notes written in the students’ engineering notebook.
•
•
•
•
•
•
Frequent opportunities for student self-reflection on their own learning
Opportunities for individualized teacher feedback to students
Optional formative pretests and summative posttests (Balanced Assessment)
Rubrics and reflective checklists in engineering notebook for engineering design
challenges
Examples of classroom assessments and checks for understanding
Essential questions embedded in curriculum to stimulate discussion and reflection
26
The 5 Cs of PLTW Elementary
•
•
•
•
•
Critical Thinking
Collaboration
Communication
Creativity
Curiosity
The Design Process for Elementary
Inside a PLTW classroom – Students as active agents
Passive
Learning
PLTW
Classroom
Students will be
able to…
Define
List
Tell
Label
Students will be
able to…
Analyze
Design
Create
Evaluate
Passive Recipients
of Knowledge
Participatory
Learners
Launch critical thinking
We think we can catch more kids at an early age and get them interested in
education. We’ve seen it happen at the middle school. We’ve seen it happen at the
high school.
- John Cerna, Superintendent at Toppenish School District in WA; Garfield Elementary, PLTW
Elementary Pilot School
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Challenge students to make mistakes
“You’re focusing so much on fundamental skills that you rarely have time
to…challenge kids to do things, make mistakes, fix their problems, and
work through things so [PLTW elementary] was a great possibility for us.”
- Jim Nair (Pilot PLTW Elementary Teacher at Lake Ave Elementary in Saratoga Springs, NY)
31
Integrate technology in the classroom
I love the hands-on…bringing more technology into the classroom with the iPads,
watching the kids explore that … the kids are completely engaged. That
makes teaching exciting, but it makes school exciting for the kids
- Kelly Wheeler (Pilot PLTW Elementary Teacher, Santa Rosa Academy in Menifee, CA)
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Learn together
It’ll be exciting for me to go through the training and be able to share with kids that
… I took a risk and I’m able to share what I’ve learned with them.
- Kelly Wheeler (Pilot PLTW Elementary Teacher, Santa Rosa Academy in Menifee, CA)
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Professional development - example
• Something like animal rescue but for PD
• E.g. a video from our October training
• E.g. a video from a classroom showing the role
of teacher as coach
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