GEOGRAPHY 180 Dr. Elizabeth Hines

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GEOGRAPHY 180
REGIONAL GEOGRAPHY OF EUROPE
AND THE AMERICAS
Dr. Elizabeth Hines
124 DeLoach Hall, (910) 962-3012
Fall 2009
[email protected], http://people.uncw.edu/hinese/
Office Hours: MWF 11-12 or by appt.
Comment [JA1]: We wish to thank Dr. Elizabeth
Hines of The University of North CarolinaWilmington for permission to use her syllabus as a
model.
Overview and Objectives: This course is the first of a two semester sequence designed to provide students with
fundamental geographic knowledge and understanding of world regions—a world view. You will learn the basic
locational geography necessary to understand the complex relationship among the physical, historical, and cultural
processes that have shaped the modern world and which influence global and local events in Europe and the
Americas. The course will also focus upon diversity within the United States and trace its origins to Europe, Central
America, and South America. Africa, Asia and the Pacific Rim are considered in Geography 181.
Required Books: Text—H.J. de Blij, et al, The World Today: Concepts and Regions in Geography, 3rd or 4th ed.,
2007 or 2009 and a good, comprehensive recent atlas. National Geographic’s College Atlas of the World comes
bundled with the 2009 text. A Goodes World Atlas is just as good.
All college students should read a newspaper every day. All Geography students should read National Geographic
each month and some news magazine each week. The Economist is one of the best, but Newsweek or Time will do.
The more you read, the more you know.
Requirements, Evaluation and Grades:
1. STUDYING: Carefully read and think about the chapters in the text. Practice taking useful lecture notes. Use
the blank maps and place names lists with the text and atlas to learn basic locational geography for each
realm. Consult the thematic maps in the atlas and in the text for physical, economic, and cultural information
and draw those regions on the blank maps too. Consult the web page for some notes, illustrations, and other
study aids. Use the crossword puzzle for each section as a study guide. Solutions will be posted on the
course web page prior to exams.
2. ATTENDANCE is expected.
3. ON-LINE MAP QUIZZES: Seven timed map quizzes will be available on-line at NC Vista Blackboard. You
may take a quiz only once anytime from its posting until two days before the next scheduled exam. Study the
blank maps and place lists before you log on to Blackboard. While you may use your atlas, text and other
materials, you have only 20 minutes to complete each 20 point quiz, for a quiz total of 140 points.
4. EXAMS: Five equally-weighted exams (worth 100 points each) will be given. Exam questions will be objective
in nature, such as multiple choice and true/false (60 points). Each exam will also have a map identification
section based on the place name lists (40 points).
• Make-ups for missed exams will only be given at the time of the Final Exam. Because make-ups are
more difficult, the wise student does not miss any exams.
5. GRADING: Your final grade will be calculated from your percentage of 640 possible points. Scale: 100%-94
= A; 93-90 = A-; 89-87 = B+; 86-84 = B; 83-80 = B-; 79-77 = C+;
76-74 = C; 73-70 = C-; 69-67 = D+; 66-64 = D; 63-60 = D-; Below 60 = F.
Extra Credit: Complete an exploration of the globalization of merchandise to earn up to 100 points.
Specific instructions can be found on the web page. There is no other extra credit.
COURSE GOALS and STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES:
GGY 180 has been designed to satisfy the University Studies Component: Living in a Diverse Nation.
Accordingly, the course addresses the following four broad student learning outcomes.
LDN 1. Describe and explain various themes and issues relevant to the study of human diversity.
LDN 2. Analyze and interpret evidence of the influence of human diversity on the history and present
culture of the United States.
LDN 3. Demonstrate an understanding of social and cultural influences that shape perspectives of various
social groups, while considering the consequences of advantage and disadvantage.
Comment [JA2]: Per UNCW guidelines:
"This [Living in Our Diverse Nation] component of
the University Studies program includes courses that
provide students with an understanding of the
importance and implications of human diversity. To
develop this understanding, courses must provide
students with opportunities to study the origins of
cultural differences and the 'cultural adhesives' that
bind people together in the United States of
America. Studying human diversity involves an
examination of the influences of one or more of the
following: race, ethnicity, class, gender, age,
socioeconomic status, disability, religious beliefs, or
sexual characteristics. Students should explore
cultural diversity and interactions in the U.S.,
including diverse cultural values and viewpoints.
Courses in the Living in our Diverse Nation
component will expose students to the many facets
of a diverse society, while also encouraging students
to develop a self-awareness and self-understanding
of the importance and implications of diversity in
their own lives."
Comment [JA3]: Reflects sample learning
outcome 1.1: Students will describe spatial variation
and diversity at global, regional, and local scales.
Comment [JA4]: Reflects sample learning
outcome 1.2: Students will explain how social and
cultural systems develop in response to varying
geographical, environmental, and historical
circumstances.
Comment [JA5]: Reflects sample learning
outcome 1.4: Students will discuss the influences
that shape the perspectives of various social groups
and evaluate the consequences of differential power
and privilege.
2
LDN 4. Evaluate claims, arguments, and theories related to the ways in which diversity has shaped and
continues to shape identity and experience in the U. S.
Further, the course has been designed to address five course specific student learning outcomes. Upon
completion of this course:
SLO 1. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the fundamental principles of regional human
geography (LDN 1).
SLO 2. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the current global mosaic (particularly the place of
Europe, North, Central and South America), the role of geography in current events, and the role of
geography in creation of our own ‘cultural landscape’ and personal narrative (LDN 1, 2, 3).
SLO 3. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the complex interaction between Europe, North,
Central, and South America, especially the interaction of these regions to form cultural diversity in
the United States (LDN 2).
SLO 4. Students will demonstrate the ability to apply geographic principles and tools, particularly map and
graphical analysis to evaluate claims, arguments, and theories of diversity in the US identity and
experience, especially those from Europe, Central, and South America (LDN 3, 4).
FORMULA FOR SUCCESS: Attend every class and pay attention, keep up with the reading, do the map location
exercises early and faithfully, study before you take a quiz, draw and label places and features on the blank maps,
complete the cross word puzzles, study with a friend, test yourself, and ask questions when you do not understand
something. Geography is fun when you use your grey matter.
Honor Code: "The University of North Carolina at Wilmington is committed to the proposition that the pursuit of truth requires
the presence of honesty among all involved. It is therefore this institution’s stated policy that no form of dishonesty among its
faculty or students will be tolerated. Although all members of the university community are encouraged to report occurrences of
dishonesty, honesty is principally the responsibility of each individual.” UNCW Undergraduate Catalogue.
TENTATIVE SCHEDULE
The following schedule lists general lecture topics, reading responsibilities, and exam dates,
all subject to change--changes will be announced in class and on the web page.
Monday’s Date
Topics
Chapter
8/17
First class Wed. 8/19/09: Introduction: What is Geography?
8/24
Natural Concepts and Processes Blackboard Quiz 1 8/28-9/2
8/31
Cultural Concepts and Processes; Maps
EXAM 1: Introduction, Friday 9/4
9/7
No Class Monday, Labor Day
Western Europe: Physiography, History and Culture
9/14
The United Kingdom
9/21
Western Europe: The “Continent
9/28
Nordic and Mediterranean Europe
EXAM 2: Europe, Friday 10/2
10/5
No class Monday (Fall Break), Eastern Europe
Introduction
Comment [JA6]: Reflects sample learning
outcomes:
2.1: Students will engage critical thinking and
academic research skills to investigate and refute
possible bias, error, and faulty argumentation in
discussions of diversity.
2.2: Students will evaluate divergent views on
diversity and discuss the implications of competing
perspectives, interpretations, and methods of
analysis.
Comment [JA7]: Reflects sample learning
outcome 1.1: Students will describe spatial variation
and diversity at global, regional, and local scales.
Comment [JA8]: Reflects sample learning
outcomes:
1.1: Students will describe spatial variation and
diversity at global, regional, and local scales.
3.2. Students will describe their own cultural
backgrounds and reflect upon how personal
experiences have shaped their attitudes and
opinions.
Comment [JA9]: Reflects sample learning
outcome 3.1: Students will articulate differences
and similarities between one’s own culture and
other cultures, at a variety of geographic scales
(local, regional, global).
Comment [JA10]: Reflects sample learning
outcomes:
2.1: Students will engage critical thinking and
academic research skills to investigate and refute
possible bias, error, and faulty argumentation in
discussions of diversity.
2.2: Students will evaluate divergent views on
diversity and discuss the implications of competing
perspectives, interpretations, and methods of
analysis.
Comment [JA11]: The course is primarily
lecture-based but also includes viewing and
discussion of videos, attendance at UNCW lectures
outside of class concerning diversity issues, and
completion of online mapping exercises. Examples
of video content used in class include "El Norte," on
the issue of illegal immigration in the US, and "We
Shall Remain Part 5: 1971 Protest at Wounded
Knee." An example of an outside class lecture is the
presentation by the "Greensboro 4," who
participated in a sit-in at a segregated Woolworth's
lunch counter in 1960.
These supplemental activities reflect sample
learning outcome 2.3: Students will participate in
activities and experiences that can enhance their
cultural competence.
1
“ Blackboard Quiz 2 9/23-9/30
1
3
10/12
Russia and the Former Soviet Union Blackboard Quizzes 3 & 4 10/12-10/16
2
10/19
Russia and the Former Soviet Union
EXAM 3: Eastern Europe, Russia and the FSU, Monday 10/19
North America: Physiography
3
10/26
North America: Historical Geography Blackboard Quiz 5 10/28-11/4
11/2
North America: Social & Cultural Geography
EXAM 4: North America, Friday 11/6
11/9
Latin America: General Introduction and History
11/16
The Caribbean Blackboard Quizzes 6 & 7 11/9-11/23
11/23
Middle America; South America
No class W or F Thanksgiving
11/30
South America; Last class on Wednesday 12/2/09
Final EXAM 5 Latin America, Monday 12/7/09, 8-11 AM
Make-up exams may be taken at this time.
4
5
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