Unique Proofs From His Ateliers

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PICASSO
Unique Proofs From His Ateliers
Front and back covers,
Tête de Femme au Chapeau/Paysage avec Baigneurs (Head of a Woman with a Hat/Landscape with Bathers) , 1962
Color linocut on Arches, Annotated in pencil by the printer ‘No. 3 Grande Tête au Chapeau - 2 Couleurs - Gravure inachevée de Picasso Linogravure - Imprimerie Arnéra - Vallauris’
Third state of three; described as “Tirage inachevé” by Baer. Though Baer records ninety-six such impressions (none signed by the artist), the
impressions were never released for sale. Baer records one impression in the Arnéra archives. Picasso designed the subject so that it could be
read either as the head of a woman (vertically) or as a landscape (horizontally).
Apart from the current impression, the only other impressions on the market outside this source have been from the Picasso estate. Stamped
in ink verso ‘Imprimerie Arnéra Archives / Non Signé’
Baer 1284.III.A . 911414.
25 1/4 x 20 3/4 inches
Unique Proofs from Picasso’s Ateliers
Picasso was a major innovator in the medium of printmaking. He altered his methods to achieve singular expressive
qualities in his multiples. He worked with numerous ateliers over the decades, including Arnéra, Mourlot,
Crommelynck, Frelaut, Lacourière, Desjobert, and Fort. His proofs illustrate the unique working relationship Picasso
maintained with his printers and their ateliers. Their craftsmanship made Picasso’s extensive and revolutionary
experimentation with the media possible. Works created in collaboration with the great printers represent the
breadth of Picasso’s considerable oeuvre in linocuts, etching, and lithography and allow us to examine the working
process behind it.
Picasso worked in an exceptional variety of media, and even within the confines of printmaking, he became a
master of the craft. Among the printers he worked with, Roger Lacouriere and Hidalgo Arnéra in particular acted as
collaborators in Picasso’s maturation as a printmaker. In the end, however, Picasso often ended up astonishing the
printmakers themselves with his focus and inventiveness.
The proofs specifically are a unique insight into the development of Picasso’s vision, whether toward a final portrait
or illustration or simply an artistic exploration of the object and theme. These are the artist’s working materials, and
the products of the actual process of collaboration with the printers. Some, such as the first plate of the Portrait
of Vollard from the Vollard Suite, were ultimately put aside and reworked (page 10). These offer an insight to the
artist’s goal, both in the impressions that strayed from his intent for the edition, and the successive reworkings.
Other proofs are pure experimentation. There are several versions of the linocut Danse Nocturne Avec une Hibou;
most of the first and second state proofs were preparatory, however, five proofs of the second state in alternative
colors seem to exist as experiments (page 4). The ink was rinsed under a showerhead for an unusual textural effect.
Beyond simple finishes, Picasso pursued true innovation in the media. Arnéra encouraged him to work with a
single plate in his linocuts, a subtractive method from the 1940s that Picasso developed to its full potential. The
destructive nature of the process, in which a single plate is carved further to print each successive state and color,
means that the proofs, intermediary stages and subsequently the final states, can never be revisited. As such, the
proofs are unique snapshots as much as the final edition. In other media, such as lithography, the ability to revisit a
state was an advantage Picasso prized. In lithographic series such as The Departure and Femme au Miroir (page 7),
the preservation of the various states allowed for multiple explorations of the same image.
Each of the proofs is a unique manifestation of this exploration of the medium and subjects as art objects. Many
of the themes—the minotaur, the bullfight, Marie-Therese herself and the other women—are among the same
that would fascinate Picasso across the years and media. The ideas and people they represented are superceded
by Picasso’s vision and to the process of interpretation. The printers and ateliers who worked with Picasso likewise
lent their craftsmanship and technical guidance to a collaboration that ultimately expressed Picasso’s own unique
interpretation of the medium itself as well as the image.
1
Arnéra
Picasso achieved some of his most innovative work materially in the medium
of linocut, working closely over a decade with the printer Hidalgo Arnéra. He
experimented with the printing methods, from the physical carving and inking of the
plates to the chemical makeup of the inks, and created about 200 linocuts in this
period. They met while Picasso was living in the south of France and was looking for
a way to eliminate the time lost between working on a print and receiving the proof
from the ateliers in Paris. Arnéra would run the proofs back and forth to Picasso’s
studio in Cannes, printing the proofs in the morning so that Picasso could continue
working when he woke.
Arnéra was an involved collaborator in Picasso’s experimentation. He encouraged
the artist to try a subtractive method of one-plate printing when he became
frustrated with the slowness of multiple plates. While Picasso had occasionally used
the linocut technique before to a limited extent, his previous efforts, like those
of most artists using the method, essentially mimicked the woodcut. His posters
tended to feature large, flat color fields and a strong sense of the carved line. As
he worked with Arnéra, however, he developed the medium to its full expressive
potential, using methods as unique as sanding the plate for texture and wetting an
inked sheet under the shower to achieve particular textural effects.
Left
L-R: Hidalgo Arnéra, Pablo Picasso,
and Roland Penrose.
Portrait d’Homme à la Fraise, Variation d’aprè El Greco
(Portrait of a Man in a Ruff, Variation after El Greco), 1962
Color linocut on Arches wove with watermark.
Inscribed in pencil by the printer, Hidalgo Arnéra, ‘93’
‘Epreuve d’essai’ (trial proof) of the definitive form from before the edition
of 50. Baer records two to three such impressions. Published by Galerie
Louise Leiris, Paris; Printed by Imprimerie Arnéra. Stamped in ink verso ‘Imprimerie Arnéra Archives/Non signé’. Bloch 1148, Baer 1320.B.a. 911411.
21 x 15 1/2 inches.
Right,
Tête de Histrion (Head of an Actor), 1965
Color linocut on watermarked Arches paper.
Trial proof of the definitive form, before the edition of 220. Published by
Musée des Augustins de Toulouse. Baer records only two to three such
impressions. Stamped in ink verso ‘Imprimerie Arnéra Archives/Non signé’.
Bloch 1849, Baer 1360.A. 911413. 20 7/8 x 25 1/4 inches.
2
Left,
Picador et Taureau (Picador and Bull), 1959
Color linocut on paper.
‘Epreuve d’essai’ (trial proof) of the fourth and final
state, from before the edition of 50. Baer records three
such impressions. Printed by Arnéra. Stamped verso
‘Imprimerie Arnéra Archives/ Non signé’. Bloch 907,
Baer 1229.IV.A. 911410. 20 7/8 x 25 1/4 inches.
Right,
Pique I, (Pike I) 1959
Color linocut on ‘offset-fort’
paper, with margins.
A working proof in black
and brown over a light
brown background, from
before the edition of 50 for
Galerie Louise Leiris, 1960.
Baer records two or three
such impressions. Printed
by Arnéra. Bloch 944,
Baer 1219.II.A. 911372.
6 1/2 x 8 7/8 inches
Above,
Picador debout avec son Cheval et une Femme
(Standing Picador with Horse and a Woman), 1959
Color linocut on paper.
Trial proof of the defintive form; aside from the edition
of 50. Published by Galerie Louise Leiris, Paris. Ink stamp
verso “Imprimerie Arnéra Archives / Non Signé”. One
of four trial proofs printed in caramel brown on a black
ground. Bloch 913, Baer 1238.A. 911210.
20 7/8 x 25 1/8 inches.
Left,
Pique II (Pike II), 1959
Color linocut on paper.
A working proof of the first state of the “Plateau
Secondaire” in orange and the first state of the “Plateau
principal” in brown over a light brown background.
Printed from the larger of two background blocks used.
Aside from the edition of 50. Baer records eight such
impressions. Ink stamp verso, “Imprimerie Arnéra
Archives / Non Signé.” Bloch 911, Baer 1228 (B.a).
911204. 20 7/8 x 25 1/4 inches
3
Arnéra
Picasso often returned to and developed extensively the themes that interested him in all his art forms, from the weeping
women to the bullfight. However, even with specific compositions he often returned and experimented with various effects.
Danse Nocturne avec un Hibou (Nocturnal Dance with an Owl) is one such composition, in which Picasso varied the colors and
effects of his proofs as experimentation. The first state, printed in yellow on a black ground (formed by an uncarved plate),
is possibly one of a kind, while the impressions printed in white on a black ground were rinsed after printing, giving each a
unique final surface.
Similar authentications and annotations by Arnéra appear on many of the linocuts in the Musée National Picasso, “La Guerre
et la Paix”, Vallauris. Several of the Arnéra inscriptions from this collection are illustrated in the exhibition catalogue “Picasso à
Vallauris / Linogravures”, Musée National Picasso, “La Guerre et la Paix”, Vallauris, 16 June-19 November 2001, ill. 2, 3, 4, 8.
Danse Nocturne avec un Hibou, 1959
Color linocut on Arches paper.
First state of two. A proof printed in yellow on a black background,
giving a mottled greenish cast. Inscribed by the printer “Linogravure
de Picasso - 305 - Les danseurs au Hibou/ 1959/ Premier Etat/
19.11.59”. Apart from the unannotated proof noted by Baer. Ink
stamp verso “Imprimerie Arnéra Archives / Non signé”. Bloch 936,
Baer 1256. 911207. 21 x 25 1/4 inches.
Danse Nocturne avec un Hibou, 1959
Color linocut on Arches watermarked paper.
Trial proof of the second and final state. Apart from the edition
of 50. Signed and anotated by the printer “Les Danseurs au Hibou
/ Lingravure Originale de Picasso / H Arnéra”. Ink stamp verso
“Imprimerie Arnéra Archives/ Non Signé”. Printed Imprimerie
Arnéra; Published Galerie L. Leiris, Paris. Bloch 936, Baer 1256.II.A.
911201. 21 x 25 1/4 inches.
Left,
Danse nocturne avec un Hibou, 1959
Color linocut on Arches.
‘Epreuve d’essai’ of the final state but printed in a different color
combination than the definitive edition. This impression is in ‘blanc
crème’ over black. Bloch 936, Baer 1256.II.C. 911208.
21 x 25 1/4 inches.
4
Jacqueline au Chapeau Noir (Jacqueline in a Black Hat), 1962
Color linocut on Arches cream wove paper with Arches watermark
Pencil signed ‘Picasso’ lower right, Inscribed ‘épreuve d’artiste’ lower left
One of approximately 35 artist’s proofs, aside from the numbered edition of 50. The third and final state. A superb impression with vibrant
colors. Printed by Arnéra, published by Galerie Louise Leiris, 1963.
Bloch 1028, Baer 1311.III.B.b. 912041. 25 x 20 3/4 inches.
5
Mourlot
Fernand Mourlot was an important collaborator in Picasso’s post-war work. His atelier had a long
heritage of printmaking beginning with a commercial print shop in the mid-1850s. It was Fernand
who would move the atelier towards fine art, eventually working with the most important artists
in Paris, from Manet to Miró. While he began with fine art posters for artists such as Daumier,
he was also pivotal in fostering the development of the editioned print. This, in turn, led to a
greater emphasis on the expressive artistic focus of a print, rather than the communicative focus
inherent in a poster. Mourlot’s catalog of Picasso’s lithographs from all ateliers includes 407
images, spanning a period of fifty years from 1919 to 1969.
Fernand Mourlot,
Picasso, in typical fashion, concentrated a majority of this work into an intense period of regular
collaboration, in the mid-to-late 1940s. He began working with Mourlot in November of 1945, with a portrait of Françoise Gilot
as the first of over 300 lithographs he would create with the atelier. Picasso would spend entire days in the studio, obsessively
reworking his images. His approach was unusual for the medium. He treated the stone much as he had his earlier engraving
plates and linoleum blocks, in that he preferred to rework a single stone.
Le Modèle et deux Personnages
(Model and Two People), 1954
Color lithograph on Arches paper.
One of five artist’s proofs aside from the
signed and numbered edition of 50. A very
rare, early lithographic work, with beautiful
painterly colors. The order of the colors
printed indicated in the margin. Dated in
plate. Provenance: From the collection of
Mourlot. Bloch 759, Mourlot 258. 911268.
19 3/4 x 25 1/2 inches.
Portrait de Famille II (Family Portait II), 1962
Lithograph on Arches wove paper, with full margins.
One of only a few, rare artist’s proofs, aside from the signed and
numbered edition of 50. Provenance: Mourlot collection.
Bloch 1030, Mourlot 384. 130046.
24 5/8 x 19 1/8 inches.
6
Femme au Miroir (Woman at the Mirror), 1950
Color Lithograph, Inscribed in pencil verso.
First state. From a set of only 5 impressions. There was no edition.
Provenance: Private Collection, US; Mourlot Collection, France.
Mourlot 197. 402668.
15 1/8 x 22 3/8 inches
Femme au Miroir (Woman at the Mirror), 1950
Lithograph, Inscribed in pencil verso.
Proof of the black stone of the third state. From a set of only 5
impressions. There was no edition. Provenance: Private Collection,
US; Mourlot Collection, France. Mourlot 197. 402670.
15 1/8 x 22 3/8 inches
Left and below
The Departure, 1951
Lithograph on Rives paper
This set (two pictured) includes Mourlot’s first, second and second
intermediate states (in sanguine over light grey background),
third, forth and fifth states (with additional ochre stone), sixth and
seventh states (with additional ochre stone), eighth state (black
stone only), ninth state (new black plate made with ink on zinc),
and the final state (a proof from two earlier plates, zinc with ochre
and black on zinc). Mourlot notes five proofs of each state except
the eighth, aside from the edition of 50. Provenance: Fernand
Mourlot. Baer 686; Mourlot 201.
13 3/4 x 17 1/4 inches.
Above,
The Departure, 1951
Lithograph
The seventh state of eleven.
Baer 686; Mourlot 201. 908473.
13 3/4 x 17 1/4 inches.
Right,
The Departure, 1951
Color Lithograph on Rives paper
The forth state of eleven. Baer 686;
Mourlot 201. 908470.
13 3/4 x 17 1/4 inches.
7
Mourlot
Tête de jeune fille (Head of a Young Girl), 1945.
A set of the 10 states of this early image (three pictured). There are two trial proofs of the first state, 18 artist reserved proofs of each state,
and 50 signed and numbered works of the tenth and final state. Created November 22, 1945. Verso inscriptions: 46389/M. 9 V - 30A/63 lower
right; Marina Picasso Collection blue oval stamp lower right. Bloch 393; Mourlot 9. 12 1/2 x 10 inches.
Tête de jeune fille
The fifth state. Scraper and crayon on
stone was used to print this state. 908778.
Tête de jeune fille
The second state. Brush and scraper on
stone was used to print this state. 908779.
Head of a Young Girl, 1949
Lithograph on Arches paper.
Inscribed in pencil lower right ‘M 147’.
First and only state. Mourlot notes only 5 proofs; there was no
edition. Provenance: Mourlot personal collection, a rare reserved
proof. Mourlot 147, Not in Bloch. 403027.
15 5/8 x 11 11/16 inches
8
Tête de jeune fille
The ninth state. Brush and scraper on stone
was used to print this state. 908783.
Jeune Femme (Young Girl), 1949
Wash drawing on zinc on Arches.
Inscribed ‘M 153 Avant le texte en rouge’ lower right margin.
One of five or six trial proofs; before the edition of 100 with red
text for the “Centenary Album of Mourlot Printing Works”, 1952.
Extremely rare in this form. Bloch 1836, Mourlot 153. 911409.
15 1/2 x 11 3/4 inches
Tête de Jeune Fille (Head of a Young Girl), 1947
Lithograph on Arches paper
Third of seven states. Sixth of six copies for the printer. Initials of printer, Fernand Mourlot, state name and numbering verso.
Bloch 423, Mourlot 68. 911933.
25 3/4 x 19 1/2 inches
9
Vollard/Lacourière
Ambroise Vollard was one of the most influential figures in modern art in Paris. A
publisher, gallerist and collector, he worked with many of the greatest artists of the late
19th and 20th century, Renoir, Cézanne and Gaugin, and later, Picasso. He helped shape
his promotion and establishing of the avant-garde artists of his day and of the previous
generation. Beyond his work as a gallerist, he wrote artist biographies and encouraged
many to take on new and extended projects.
His first exhibition of Picasso’s work took place in 1901, and continued through the 1930s.
In 1930, Picasso began work on The Vollard Suite, 100 etchings created over seven years
exploring themes of classicism that enthralled Picasso throughout his career. The suite
ends with three portraits of Vollard. The printer Roger Lacouriere pulled the impressions.
Ambroise Vollard
Portrait of Vollard IV, 1937
Etching and aquatint on Montval laid paper.
Inscribed lower left in pencil, likely by Lacourière, “A Vollard
par Picasso”, lower right “planche refusé”. One of a few proof
impressions of the first state of two. No edition of this plate.
Bloch 1322, Baer 620. 910824. 13 5/8 x 9 5/8 inches.
Left,
Portrait of Vollard, II, 1937
Aquatint on Montval laid paper
with the Vollard watermark.
Plate 98 from the Vollard Suite.
A rare proof aside from the
total edition of 310. Bloch 231.
908769. 13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches.
Right,
Portrait of Vollard, III, 1937
Etching on Montval laid paper
with the Vollard watermark.
Plate 100 from the Vollard Suite.
A rare and early proof aside
from the total edition of 310.
Bloch 233. 908770.
13 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches.
10
Minotaure Aveugle Guidé par une Petite Fille aux Fleurs
(Blind Minotaur Guided by a Little Girl with Flowers), 1934
Drypoint etching on Montval laid paper with ‘Picasso’ watermark.
Pencil signed ‘Picasso’ lower right. Twelfth and final state. From the edition of 260, after steelfacing and cancelling of “La Mort de Marat.”
Printed in 1939 for the Edition Vollard. There was also an edition of 50, as well as proofs of this and the preceding eleven states.
Etching created on the large plate used for “La Mort de Marat” (The Death of Marat), upside down upper left of the current composition. The
first of several etchings of the subject and concurrent with a series of similar drawings, the minotaur was one of Picasso’s favorite themes,
and one of the themes of the Vollard Suite. Provenance: Laure Wyss, Zurich.
Bloch 222, Baer 434.B.d. 911610. 9 7/8 x 13 5/8 inches.
11
Trois Femmes Nues et une Coupe d’Anémones
(Three Women and a Bowl of Anemones), 1933
Etching on Montval paper with Picasso watermark.
Pencil signed ‘Picasso’ lower right.
Dated in the plate, lower right, ‘Paris, 6 Avril XXXIII’ (pulled in
reverse). From the watermarked edition of 260, Plate 67 from
the Vollard Suite, printed after steelfacing by Lacourière in
1939. There was also an additional edition of 50, as well as 7
proofs after steelfacing and 1 proof before steelfacing.
Bloch 176, Baer 329.B.d. 911564.
14 1/4 x 11 5/8 inches.
Bacchus et Femme Nue Entendue
(Bacchus and Reclining Female Nude), 1934
Engraving and drypoint on Montval laid paper with Vollard
watermark.
Third and final state. From the unnumbered edition of 55
printed by Lacouriere in 1942 without steelfacing. Total
tirage 55 plus proofs. Published by Vollard, Paris. Brigitte
Baer identifies the woman as Marie-Therese, and titles this
“Bacchus et Marie-Thérèse (en Ariane?).” Bloch 284; Baer 432.
III.c. 911652. 11 1/4 x 8 3/4 inches.
12
Lacourière
Picasso began working with Roger Lacouriere in 1934, a major step in his development as
a printmaker. Lacouriere introduced him more thoroughly to the aquatint technique and
a deeper use of intaglio. Picasso would work on major projects with him, most famously
the Minotauromachy, as well as the Vollard Suite. Many of the themes he explored in this
period were influenced by the chaos in Picasso’s personal life as well as an anxiety about
the onset of civil war in his homeland. Minotaurs, Spanish motifs and a look at the past are
ever-present. Lacouriere was the first printer to truly act as a collaborator with Picasso, in
the sense of working in-depth with Picasso to gain the technical means of expression equal
to what he could already achieve in painting.
Roger Lacouriere
Femmes d’Algers, D’Aprés Delacroix. VIII
(Algerian Women, After Delacroix), 1955
Sugarlift aquatint on Rives wove paper.
Annotated ‘2e etat’, the second state of five. Extremely rare, it is one of
three proofs of this state. A total of 28 images exist for all 5 states: 3 images
in the first state, 3 images in the 2nd state, 7 images in 3rd state, 8 images in
4th state, 7 images in 5th and final state. Dated ‘31-1-55’ in plate. This work
by Picasso was never editioned. Baer 917.II. 911316. 11 x 13 5/8 inches.
En la Taberna (In the Tavern), 1934
Etching on Richard de bas Auvergne paper.
Stamped signature lower right.
Numbered ‘38/50’ lower left. From the edition of 50 published by Galerie Louise Leiris.
One of 69 impressions, plus proofs, printed
by Atelier Lacouriere et Frélaut in 1961
before steelfacing; aside from the earlier
proofs printed by Lacouriere.
Bloch 286, Baer 439.C.b. 911666. 9 1/4 x 11
3/4 inches.
13
Crommelynck
Aldo Crommelynck first met Picasso as a rising printmaker
in the Atelier Lacouriere. As with Lacouriere previously,
Picasso would create extensive series in close collaboration
with Crommelynck. The 347 Series, named for the number
of etchings created for it, was completed in 1968 and
caused some stir in Paris with its often erotic themes. The
156 Series, created between 1970 and 1972, was the last
major print series Picasso created.
Aldo Crommelynck
Crommelynck began his relationships with many of the
preeminent modern artists there, such as Miró, Léger and Matisse. He left the atelier in 1955, having already established
himself as a creative and technically meticulous printer. Along with his brothers, he opened his atelier in Paris, and continued to
work with Picasso. In fact, when the artist moved to Mougins, Aldo and Piero set up a printing workshop nearby to accomodate
his work, and would print all of Picasso’s etchings until the end of the artist’s life in 1973.
Untitled (From 347 Suite), 1968
Sugar-lift aquatint on Rives BFK wove paper.
Plate 123 from the ‘347 Suite’ with full margins.
One of five proofs before steelfacing, prior to the edition of 50. There were also 17 artist’s proofs after steelfacing.
Listed in the Picasso Archives, Paris, as inventory number 29050.
Provenance: Pablo Picasso; Picasso Family Collection with oval stamp verso. Bloch 1604, Baer 1619.A. 905332.
19 1/2 x 13 1/4 inches.
14
Below,
Sable Mouvant: Deux Femmes au Miroir
(Quicksand: Two Women at the Mirror), 1965
Aquatint, etching and drypoint on Japon ancien.
Third and final state on paper-thin ‘Japon ancien’ paper. The lower left
corner is cut, indicating that this was probably a “mise en place” proof
(preparatory proof), per notes in Baer. Aside from the editions of 60 and 20,
illustrating the suite ‘Sable Mouvant’ by Pierre Reverdy; Published by Louis
Broder Éditeur. Bloch 1185, Baer 1154.III.B.d (Note 2). 911455.
15 1/8 x 10 7/8 inches
Sable Mouvant: Peintre et Modèle Accoudé
(Quicksand: Painter and Leaning Model), 1964
Aquatint and drypoint on Japon paper.
The only state printed on extremely thin Japon paper. A
proof aside from the edition and the proofs noted by Baer.
Numbered and dated in plate “III 8.2.64” upper right.
Bloch 1187, Baer 1157.B. 911457. 15 1/8 x 10 7/8 inches.
Sable Mouvant: Peintre Debout à son Chevalet, avec un Modèle
(Quicksand: Standing Painter at his Easel, with a Model), 1964
Aquatint on Japon paper.
The only state on extremely thin laid Japon paper. A proof aside from the edition
and the proofs noted by Baer. Numbered and dated in plate “II 8.2.64” lower right.
Bloch 1186, Baer 1155.B. 911456.
15 1/8 x 10 7/8 inches
15
Belle jeune femme à sa toilette
(Beautiful Young Girl at Her Vanity), 1971
Etching on wove paper.
Plate 144 from Series 156. One of 15 proofs aside from the
numbered edition of 50. Bloch 1998, Baer 2008.B.b. 911106.
14 3/8 x 19 1/4 inches.
Sur le Scene: Viellard Barbu S’Appretant
a Poignarder une Femme Dans Son Lit,
1966
Etching and aquatint on Rives.
Signed with atelier stamp lower right.
Annotated in pencil lower left. Plate from
the 60 Series. One of three proofs before the
steelfacing and beveling of the plate; apart
from the regular edition of 50 plus 15 artist
proofs. Bloch 1421; Baer 1449.A. 911741.
8 3/4 x 12 3/4 inches.
16
Le Peintre et son Modèle (from Dans l’Atelier),
(The Painter and His Model, from In the Atelier), 1963
Etching on Japon Nacre paper.
Signed in pencil lower right and inscribed ‘e.a.’ lower left.
A proof from after the edition of 150 plus proofs printed as a frontispiece to Le Peintre et son Mòdele, 1965. Aside from the 10 proofs on
Japon noted by Baer. Provenance: London Arts Group, Detroit; Acquired from a private collection in Dallas, 1970.
Bloch 1139; Baer 1136.C. 911935.
12 x 11 inches
17
Frelaut
Jacques Frelaut revived the Atelier Lacouriere in 1957. The son of Jean
Frelaut, a French printmaker and friend of Lacouriere who had studied at the
Ecole des Beaux-Arts at the turn of the century. Jacques directed the atelier
beside his brother, Roger. Artists such as Chagall and Miro worked with the
atelier known for its technical precision. Picasso worked with Jacques on
some of his most evocative etched portraits of women, the energy of the
precise but gestural line rendered among soft aquatint resembling ink washes.
Jacques Frelaut in studio
Sabartes avec deux femmes, (Sabartes with Two Women) c.1959
Drypoint on Rives wove paper.
Signature stamp lower right.
Annotated in pencil, “Gravure inedite ler Etat” lower left. One of two
known proofs of the first state of eight. There was no edition of the image
in any state. Provenance: Pablo Picasso; by descent to Marina Picasso; Picasso Family Collection. Bearing an oval stamp verso, Inv. 25949, recorded
in the Picasso Archives in Paris.
Baer 1060.I. 912044. 9 3/4 x 7 3/4 inches.
Right,
Centaure et homme barbu (Centaur with Bearded Man),
1961
Sugar-lift aquatint in color on Arches wove paper.
Signature stamp lower right.
Annotated in pencil “Gravure inedite,” lower left. An
extraordinarily rare and important proof, one of only two
printed by Frelaut with brown background, from a total of six
impressions. No edition. Provenance: Frelaut; Pablo Picasso,
by descent through the Picasso Family Collection, bearing the
oval stamp verso, Inv. 25973 recorded in the Picasso Archives
in Paris. Baer 1084B . 910117. 10 1/2 x 14 inches
18
Sculpture. Tête de Marie-Therese,
(Sculpture. Head of Marie-Therese) 1934
Etching and drypoint on Richard de Bas laid paper.
Stamped signature lower right. Numbered ‘12/50’ lower left.
The second and final state, from the edition of 50 published by Galerie Louise Leiris in 1981, printed by Frelaut after steelfacing.
After the proofs and edition of 55 printed by Lacouriere in 1942. Total tirage 137.
Bloch 276, Baer 417.II.C.b.1. 912045.
12 3/8 x 9 inches.
19
Desjobert
The Atelier Desjobert in Paris was founded by lithographer Edmond Desjobert
and eventually passed on to his son, Jacques. Edmond worked with Picasso
on some of his earliest lithographs. He would later print for Dali, Chagall and
Matisse, as well as many emerging artists. As a result his workshop became a
meeting place for many artists in Paris, particularly foreigners and those new
to the medium. He was open to experimentation in the lithography process,
including the chine collé method and working with washes on the stone.
Edmond Desjobert
Le peintre et son modèle
(The Painter and His Model),1929-1930
Lithograph on BFK Rives velin with full margins.
An artist’s proof outside the numbered edition of 50 for the book by
Eugenio d’Ors, “Pablo Picasso.” Bloch 98, Baer 247.b, Mourlot XXVII.
910859. 9 1/2 x 11 1/2 inches
Fort
Picasso would come to work with several printmakers through Vollard. Along
with Lacouriere, Picasso met Louis Fort, with whom he became close friends.
Fort worked with Vollard on many of his large editions of prints, facilitated
by his use of the technique of steelfacing. It likewise allowed Picasso to print
larger editions while working with Vollard. Aside from increasing his already
considerable exposure as an artist, this appealed to Picasso’s aspired-to
populist tendencies.
Picasso bought Fort’s printing press when the printmaker retired, a testament
to their friendship as well as Picasso’s enjoyment of the process in the
printmaker’s atelier.
Deux Femmes Nues II (Two Female Nudes II), 1930
Etching on strong wove paper with margins.
Signed lower margin and numbered “123 - 125”.
A unique impression, signed and numbered by Picasso in yellow crayon or ink. Superb
early proof after the steel-facing of the plate which allows for extraordinary contrast.
Aside from the total edition of 125. Published by Albert Skira in 1931.
Bloch 132, Baer 199.b.2. 908332.
12 1/2 x 9 inches
20
Tête de Femme au Chapeau/Paysage avec Baigneurs (Head of a Woman with a Hat/Landscape with Bathers)
Color linocut on Arches, Annotated in pencil by the printer. 25 1/4 x 20 3/4 inches. 911414.
GALERIE
MICHAEL
Building Museum Quality Collections One Work at a Time
224 North Rodeo Drive, Via Rodeo, Beverly Hills, CA 90210
Tel: 310.273.3377 | Fax: 310.273.0879
www.galeriemichael.com
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