BIG IDEA: Some properties of objects can be

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Kindergarten
BIG IDEA: Color is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
Activity # 1, 1 day (45 min)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
color word cards written in the color (the word red is written in red)
Provided in grade level kit:
20-30 colored chips per student + 1set for teacher
one tray for each color of chip for clean up
Large rectangles of green and red paper (1/class)
Large rectangles of a single color with a light and a dark shade (e.g. light blue and dark blue) (1/class)
Small rectangles of different shades of colors (cut from paint samples) enough for two or three sets of colors/student
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Activity 1 sheet- 1/student (two versions are provided-one in color with clues and one in black and white)
I can put objects that have the same color in groups.
Learning
I can put shades of a color in order from dark to light and light to dark.
Target
Word Bank color, red, yellow, green, blue, black, white, brown, purple, shade
Teacher
Notes
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A unit on the five senses previous to this unit would be helpful for students so they have a
richer vocabulary and better understanding of using senses to find out about and describe
properties of objects.
Having many things labeled in the classroom will help students as they write about objects.
They can copy the labels of things they want to write about.
Many of the activities in this unit are closely related to things you probably already do in math.
You may choose to do some of these activities in math and then refer back to them as you do
other of these activities in science. This is good because it helps students to see connections
between math and science which they may not see without your help.
Use this activity as a pre-assessment. Students will need to know colors in order to sort things
by properties later.
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Activity
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You should save all of your charts until the end of the unit as you will refer back to them and
build on many of them throughout the unit.
Distribute a tray of colored chips to each pair of students. Encourage the students to observe
the chips and discuss how they are alike and different.
Hold up a chip and the color word written in the same color and ask the students to hold up
chips of the same color. Ask the students to name the color they are holding then return it to
the tray. Repeat this with each color.
When students are proficient at this, call out a color without holding up a chip and see if
students can find a chip of the color named. You may ask individual students in order to
assess their ability to recognize and name colors.
Have the students put the chips on their tray into groups. Ask students how they put their
chips into groups. Sort the chips on your tray into groups by color. Have them name the color
of each pile.
Put a different color word printed in that color on each empty tray. Have students put their
chips away by putting them onto the correct tray.
Use questions to encourage students to identify the color of objects as they work with other
materials throughout the day.
Hold up green and red paper rectangles. Ask students to tell how they are the same and how
they are different. Listen to answers and lead a discussion that emphasizes the difference in
color.
Next hold up a light shade and dark shade of the same color rectangle and repeat the question.
Introduce and reinforce the idea that they are the same color but are different shades (light and
dark). Show students a collection of objects that are the same color but different shades. Ask
them to describe what they observe about the objects. Ask them how they could put the
objects in order.
Ask students to look at clothing and other things around the room to find two shades of the
same color.
Give each student a set of colored rectangles from paint chips and ask them to sort them. Then
have them sort one pile into two piles, a light and a dark pile. If the children seem to
understand the concept of shade, have them put the rectangles in order from light to dark.
Then let them sort the remaining color piles by shade.
Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
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Assessment
Center- Make paint samples available for students to sort and serial order.
Notebook- Students choose three shades of blue crayons and order from dark to light. Then
they color in the circles on their notebook page. They repeat with red, then with green and
yellow but from light to dark.
 Assessment- Observe whether students are able to identify and sort by colors. Observe
whether they are able to sort and order shades of different colors.
Literature Connection
Read after lesson Is it Red? Is it Yellow? Is it Blue? by Tana Hoban
Notebook Connection
Students use crayons to color circles of different shades of four colors in order from dark to light.
(The notebook page is provided in color and without the color shading so that you can print it
either way.)
Technology Connection
I Spy is an internet picture book.
http://www.primarygames.com/storybooks/i_spy/start.htm
Flo and Zoe Sort It Out is an interactive game for sorting objects. Only the first two games sort by
color, then it moves to shapes, use, etc.
http://www.scholastic.com/clifford/play/sortitout/sortitout.htm
Observe as students identify and sort by colors.
 Are they able to identify each color?
 Are they able to put same color chips together?
 Can they identify the color of the chips in each pile?
Observe as students sort and order shades of color, and look at how they ordered shades in
notebook.
 Do they put all shades of a color together or sort them as different colors?
 Are they able to order from dark to light and light to dark?
 Do they choose three shades of a color or different colors (e.g. choosing an orange and yellow
for red)?
Color is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
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BIG IDEA: Shape is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
Activity # 2, Day 2 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
 word cards for vocabulary words illustrated with a picture to match
 optional- stickers or cutouts of shapes to paste in notebook
 Chart of shapes (see example below)
Provided in grade level kit:
 one set of black foam shapes (one square, one circle, one triangle, one rectangle, one diamond) per student and teacher
 trays to hold shapes
 stencils of shapes (square, circle, triangle, rectangle, diamond)
 collection of foam shapes (square, circle, triangle, rectangle, diamond) in different sizes and colors, about 20 total for each student
 Shapes, Shapes, Shapes Tana Hoban
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Chart for Activity 2 per student
Notebook page for Activity 2 per student
I can tell the shape of objects.
Learning
I can tell how shapes are different.
Target
I can find shapes in pictures and other objects.
Word Bank shape, rectangle, square, circle, diamond, triangle, sides, corners
Teacher
Notes
Use this activity as a pre-assessment. Students will need to know shapes in order to sort things by
properties later.
Activity
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Distribute a set of black foam shapes on a tray to each student. Have them tell how the blocks
are the same and how they are different.
Hold up a block and have the students find their matching one.
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Vocabulary Strategy for shape names- hold up name of each shape with drawing of shape on
card as you hold up the shape. After activity, post the shape names along with the word shape
as a title.
Have students describe what the block looks like.
Vocabulary Strategy for sides and corners- If students bring up the words sides and corners
have them show what those things are on something in the classroom and label them with the
words. If they don’t bring up the words, point to the sides of a shape and ask students what
they would be called. Introduce the word side and point out sides of things in the classroom.
Have students point out sides of some other thing and label. Do the same with corners.
Have students identify and count the number of sides and corners on each shape. Name the
shape. Trace the shape on the chart and write the number of sides and corners and the name of
the shape. Repeat with each shape.
Shape
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Number of sides
Number of corners
Name of Shape
4
4
rectangle
0
0
circle
3
3
triangle
4
4
square
5
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Give each student a container of various shapes. Have them match the blocks by shape to their
original black blocks. They can count or line up their blocks to determine which shape they
have the most of and report that to the class. (If you have already had students make graphs
you can make connection to graphing. If not, you can ask how lining up the shapes helped
them to see which they had the most of and refer back to this activity when you do graphing.)
 Call students attention to shapes in the classroom (e.g. floor tiles, window, etc.) Have them
tell which shape they have that matches the shape of that object. Have students find objects
that match their shapes and challenge other students to find the matching objects.
 Literature connection- Show Shapes, Shapes, Shapes by Tana Hoban and have students pick
out shapes that match theirs. If there are new shapes that they don’t have they can count sides
and corners, name and add to chart.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- On the chart page students copy info from the class chart to place in their
notebooks. Since this isn’t really assessing anything, if time is an issue you may just want to
do the class chart on the document camera and make copies for students to put in notebooks.
On the notebook page students can draw or trace each shape using a stencil or use stickers of
the shape or paste in cutouts of the shapes and label.
 Assessment- Observe whether students are able to identify and sort by shape. Observe
whether they are able to identify shapes in everyday objects.
Literature Connection
Shapes, Shapes, Shapes Tana Hoban
Mouse Shapes Ellen Stoll Walsh
Notebook Connection
Have students trace each shape or use the stencil (it is easier for students who haven’t got well
developed fine motor skills). Those who are able can label their tracings with the name of the
shape.
Technology Connection
Sammy’s Shapes is a picture book to read online. A snake makes shapes and students name them
before the name is shown.
http://www.primarygames.com/storybooks/sammy/start.htm
Shape sorting game
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Assessment
http://www.primarygames.com/puzzles/match_up/shape_match/shape_match.htm
As students work observe and ask questions of individual students about the names of shapes and
why they are sorting as they are.
 Can they identify different shapes by name?
 Are they sorting by shape rather than color or size?
 Are they able to name shapes in objects in the classroom and in pictures in the book?
In their notebook
 Can they identify each shape (by labeling or orally?)
Shape is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
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BIG IDEA: Texture is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
Activity # 3, Day 3 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Add things to junk box (junk box contains some things, but you may want to divide what you have up so each group gets a box and add
additional objects that are smooth, furry, rough, and bumpy)
Word cards with texture, smooth, furry, rough, and bumpy.
Provided in grade level kit:
Each student or small group will need the following objects in a sock:
 2x2 square of sandpaper
 2x2 square of foam
 2x2 square of fur
 2x2 square of corrugated cardboard (the bumpy kind)
junk box with various smooth, furry, bumpy, and rough objects
sorting hoops
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Notebook page for Activity 3 per student
I can tell how objects feel.
I can tell what texture is.
I can sort objects by texture.
Word Bank texture, bumpy, smooth, rough, furry, sort
Learning
Target
Teacher
Notes
Use this as a pre-assessment. Students will need to know texture in order to sort things by
properties later.
Activity
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Distribute a sock of materials to each student or to small groups. Tell students to reach into
the sock and find something furry. Ask students to tell how they knew which thing to take out.
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Ask students to again reach in the sock and find something rough. Ask students to tell how
they knew what to take out. Students may have chosen either the sandpaper or the cardboard.
Have some who took each tell why.
 Have students find something smooth in the sock and discuss. Then find something bumpy.
Discuss the difference in bumpy and rough and determine which is a better example of each.
 Vocabulary strategy for texture- Introduce the term texture as the way something feels.
Show a card with the word. Reinforce this by having students tell the texture of each object
from the sock (This has a furry texture.) Display the word texture with the words bumpy,
rough, smooth, and furry.
 Have each student chose one of the objects from the sock and go around the room to find
something that has the same texture. They can use the word texture to tell about the things
they found.
 Place 4 sorting hoops on the floor in the center of the students. Place one of the squares they
used earlier in each of the hoops. Place the word that matches that texture in the hoop as well.
Have each student choose an object from the junk box and place it in the hoop they think it
should go in and tell why based on its texture.
 Vocabulary strategy for sort- Write the word sort and read it. Tell students that when they
placed their objects into different groups by texture they were sorting by the property of
texture. Ask students about some other ways they have sorted to help them connect earlier
learning. You may want to sort students by some property they share.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students can make rubbings of objects with each of the textures and label them.
Or they can glue an object or picture of an object with each texture in their notebooks and
label.
 Assessment- Observe whether students are able to identify and sort by texture. Observe
whether they are able to identify texture in other objects.
Literature Connection
Furry Kittens by Christiane Gunzi
Notebook Connection
Notebook page for Activity 3
Technology Connection
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Assessment
Observe whether students are able to identify and sort by texture.
 Can students name textures of objects?
 Can students sort by texture?
 Can students add new objects from the junk box to their groups by texture?
Look at notebook page.
 Can the student identify (in writing or orally) the texture of each object shown?
Texture is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
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BIG IDEA: Size is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
Activity # 4, Day 4 (45 min.) (will need extra time for cutting and gluing)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Word card for size, word cards to write size words students supply
Pre-cut pictures for notebook activity 4 into strips so that there are three sets of pictures for each student.
Provided in grade level kit:
Blocks from Activity 2 (a set for the teacher and for each student or small group)
One set of sorting hoops for the class
meter lengths of string tied into loops- three for each group
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Notebook page for Activity 4 per student
Learning
Target
I can tell the size of an object.
I can sort objects by their size.
Word Bank size, large, small, middle sized
Teacher
Notes
Use this as a pre-assessment. Students will need to know size in order to sort things by properties
later.
Activity
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Show students a box of blocks. Place the sorting hoops on the floor and begin silently sorting
the blocks by color. After placing several blocks in the hoops, ask a student to tell how they
think you are sorting and explain why they think so. Continue sorting the same way and ask
another student if they agree with the first and to explain why. Continue sorting and ask
students if they agree and why one more time.
Collect the blocks and begin sorting again, this time by shape and repeat asking students to
describe how you are sorting and to explain why they think so.
Continue to do this, making it a little harder by sorting by color and shape for a while before
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Assessment
changing to only one (e.g. put only red triangles, blue squares, and yellow circles in the hoops
at first, then put other colors of the correct shape.)
 Next, sort by size. After a few shapes are sorted, hold up a new one and ask if anyone can
show where they think it goes and why. If they are wrong, tell them that’s not the groups you
had in mind and show where it should go. Then hold up another block and ask where they
think it should go. Ask students to tell what you used to sort the blocks.
 Vocabulary strategy for size- show a word card for size and talk about the different sizes of
the blocks. If students mention thickness, widths, etc. as size, accept that but don’t bring it up
yourself. List words they use to describe size with illustrations on a chart or on separate cards
with the heading of size.
 Give students blocks and have them sort by size using string for sorting hoops. Ask them to
tell how they are sorting. Ask them where another block would fit into their sorting circles and
why.
 Make a three column chart. Write “smaller than me,” “the same size as me,” and “larger than
me” in the columns. Draw a child in the middle column. Have them name something that
would be large compared to them and draw it in the large column and have them name
something that would be small compared to them and draw it in the small column. Have them
think of other things to draw in each column (those in the middle should be about the size of
them).
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook Connection- Students paste pictures of objects that are the same except for size
(small, middle sized, and large) (e.g. baby bears bowls) in their own three column chart. Each
kid doesn’t need every sheet, only three or so sets of pictures.
 Assessment- Observe as students sort blocks by size. Use notebook page as assessment.
Literature Connection
The Three Bears, The Three Billy Goats Gruff
Technology Connection
There are various online quizzes at this site for matching shapes and distinguishing sizes.
http://www.ixl.com/math/standards/connecticut/kindergarten
Observation of students as they sort by size.
 Do they make two or more groups and name them by size (big, small, middle size, fat, thin,
long, short, etc.)
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 Do they put shapes of different sizes in the appropriate groups?
 Are they able to place and justify the placement of a different block by size?
Notebook page
 Do they place the pictures under the appropriate heading?
 Can they tell why they placed the pictures where they did?
Size is a property that can be observed and used to group objects.
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BIG IDEA: Objects can be described by their properties.
Activity # 5, Day 5 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Classroom objects (books, scissors, pencils, markers, chairs, etc.)
word card for object
chart with word properties at top
word cards with different property words and illustrations for center (optional)
Provided in grade level kit:
variety of blocks of different colors, sizes and shapes
chart paper
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Notebook page for Activity 5 per student
I can tell what an object is.
Learning
I can tell about objects using their properties
Target
Word Bank object, property
Teacher
Notes
Activity
Pre-assess to make sure students know colors and shapes.
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Vocabulary strategy for object- Show students the word object. Each time you use the word,
hold up the word card. Use the term object to present classroom objects such as books, scissors,
pencils, markers, chairs, etc. For example, say, “This object is a book.” As each object is
presented, ask a student to describe it to the class (tell what it is like.) Ask students what an object
is and ask them to give some examples (when you ask them what it is, they may give you an
example. Just state, yes, that is an example of an object. What is an object?) Write their
definition and examples on a chart like the one below. Use illustrations to help them recall the
examples.
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What is it?
object
What are some examples?
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Display a tray of blocks. Ask individual students to tell something about a block on the tray.
Explain that the words the students have been using are words that describe or tell about an object.
Vocabulary strategy for properties- Show students the word properties on a chart. Below the
word, write some of the words the students used to tell about the blocks. Read the words with the
students and tell them that these properties help us to tell one block from another. (If a student tells
what a block is made of, tell them that all the blocks are made of the same thing so this word
won’t help us to tell them apart.)
Read a property word and have a student show which block is being described. Repeat this
several times with different students, sometimes asking several students at once to choose a block
with the stated property so that they see that blocks that are different in some ways can still have
some properties that are the same.
Choose an object in the room and describe it using properties. For example, white and smooth are
properties of this chalk. Ask students to choose and describe an object by its properties. If they
include descriptions of how an object is used encourage them to concentrate on the properties of
the object by asking how they could describe it if they weren’t allowed to tell how it is used. If
they give words for what it is made of, write the materials words on another chart and tell them we
will learn more about those words later.
Post the properties chart and continue to add to it.
Play the Find the Object Game (Directions Follow)
1. The leader whispers to the teacher the name of an object in the room. The object must be
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visible to all players.
2. The leader then tells the class in which part of the room the object is located.
3. Without revealing the name of the object, the leader uses property words to give the other
players clues.
4. After each clue, one or two students may offer a single guess.
5. Clues are given until the object is guessed and the player to identify the object becomes the
leader.
 Center- place property words on cards with illustrations and allow students to label things in the
classroom with the properties. You could also supply blank stickers and let students copy property
words and stick them to objects they own.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook Connection- Students draw a picture of an object in the classroom and label their
object. They then give two properties of their object. There are no lines on this part of the page in
order to allow students to write more than one property if they choose to do so.
 Assessment- Observe as students tell properties of the blocks and of objects in the classroom. Use
the notebook page as an assessment as well.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
Assessment
Observe as students tell properties of the blocks and of objects in the classroom and as they play the
game.
 Were students able to describe the blocks or the objects using properties?
 Did they give materials or uses as descriptions instead of properties?
 Were they able to name objects that had the properties given or did they make wild guesses?
Use the notebook page as an assessment.
 Were students able to show and label an object?
 Did they give two property words that described the object?
 Did they give material or use words instead?
Objects can be described by their properties.
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BIG IDEA: Objects can be sorted by their properties.
Activity # 6, Day 6 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Provided in grade level kit:
8-10 different buttons per student
tray to hold buttons per student
wikki sticks
clear packing tape
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Notebook page for Activity 6 per student
I can tell about objects using their properties.
Learning
I can sort objects by their properties.
Target
Word Bank object, property, sort
Teacher
Notes
Activity
You will use the chart of properties that students have been developing. Remember that material is not a
property. If buttons are sorted by material, have students sort them further by a property of that material.
 Give each student a button. Look at the chart of properties. Have each child tell a property of their
button. If their property is not yet on the chart, add it. If it is already there, point it out.
 Give each student a tray of buttons. Give them time to look at their buttons and discuss the properties
of their buttons with their partner. See if they come up with any other property words to add to the
chart.
 Call out a property and have students hold up a button from their collection that has that property. If
some properties cause difficulties, repeat them and give students assistance.
 Pick out color words on chart and circle them with wikki sticks. Read the words and ask students how
they are alike. Tell students to put their buttons in groups of separate colors. Allow students to
choose their own criteria and number of groups. They may do all red buttons in one group and all
other buttons in another group, each color in a separate group, or they may group by shades. Have
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Assessment
students describe how they sorted their buttons by color as you go to each student. You may ask some
to describe to the class.
 Ask students to sort their buttons by a property other than color. Ask students to tell how they sorted
and emphasize property and group words (e.g. John put round buttons in one group and square buttons
in another group. Square and round are words that tell the shape of buttons, so John sorted by shape.)
If students sort by materials you can have them further sort those groups by other properties as well.
 As students sort by other properties, call attention to those categories (size, shape, texture) and sort
those words from the properties chart into other charts. Or use word cards and sort them in a pocket
chart.
 Center- keep a container of buttons in a center for students to sort in different ways.
 Meaning Making- complete what we did/what we learned chart with students. Be sure to keep the
chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook Connection- Students can choose a favorite button and tape it or a picture of it into their
notebook. They can write words that describe some properties of their favorite button.
 Assessment- Move among students as they sort buttons. Carry along a few buttons as you go. Ask
students into which of their groups one of the new buttons would fit and why.
Literature Connection
Frog and Toad Are Friends by Arnold Lobel has a story about a lost button and the friends use properties
to eliminate each button they find.
Technology Connection
Submit questions to the computer about the properties of buttons to guess the secret button.
http://www.learner.org/teacherslab/math/patterns/buttons/
Observe students as they sort buttons and ask where they would put a new button and why.
 Does student sort buttons by some property and put buttons in groups correctly according to their
stated properties?
 Can student give reasonable explanation for why the new button belongs in a group or why it would
not fit in any of their groups?
On their notebook
 Does the student write or tell properties that describe their button rather than material or use?
Objects can be sorted by their properties.
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BIG IDEA: Objects are made of materials and have the properties they do because of the
materials they are made of.
Activity # 7, Day 7 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
junk box (make sure it has objects from different materials) containing objects made of one material rather than many
mystery chart from previous lessons
Provided in grade level kit:
The Button Box Book by Margarette S. Reid (big book preferably)
a wood, metal, and plastic button for each student
highlight tape or wikki stix
clear packing tape
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Notebook page for activity 7 per student
I can tell what materials are.
Learning
I can sort objects by the materials they are made of.
Target
Word Bank materials
Teacher
Notes
Activity
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Read aloud The Button Box by Margarette S. Reid.
Look at properties chart students have created. Ask students to recall if they heard any
property words in the book.
Go back through the book and have students stop you when they hear a property word (they
can hold up a stop sign, hold up their hand, etc.) When they stop you, ask a student to say
and/or point out the property word you read. Highlight the word on the page in the book (with
highlight tape or wikki stick) and ask students if they see the word on the property chart. If it
isn’t there, add it.
If students stop you to point out a materials word, say “That is something else, not a property,
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but I’m going to put it on the mystery chart from day 5 to see if we can figure out what it is.”
 Give students a wood button, a metal button, and a plastic button. Ask them to think about
how the properties are the same and how they are different and tell a partner. Ask several
students to share their ideas. Point out any properties they give that are on the properties chart
and point out materials words that are on the mystery chart. Add any new words to either
chart.
 Vocabulary strategy for materials Talk about the words on the mystery chart and ask
students if they have ideas about how all the words are alike. Record and discuss students’
ideas. Lead them to the idea that the words tell what objects are made of. Write this on the
chart and tell students that what objects are made of are materials. Add the title Materials to
the chart.
 Go back through the Button Box book and pick out any other materials words and add to the
list. See if students can think of any others.
 Give each group of students a junk box and have them work together to sort the objects in it by
material. Then have them each take one of the categories and sort it further by some other
property.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students choose an object from a collection of the teacher (yarn, tin foil,
construction paper, cardboard, foam, plastic, birthday candle, popsicle stick, packing peanut,
coin, cloth, sponge, etc.) they can tape to their notebook page for activity 7 and write the name
of the material and some properties.
 Assessment- Observe students as they sort objects by material. Use notebook page for
assessment.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
Assessment
As they sort are students able to sort by material?
In notebook, do they correctly identify the material they chose to put in their notebook? Do they
give properties of the material?
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20
Objects are made of materials and have the properties they do
because of the materials they are made of.
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21
BIG IDEA: There is a difference between the materials an object is made of and its properties.
Activity # 8, Day 8 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
 Sets of three objects that are the same except made of different materials (1 set/ group) Some examples are: A wooden, plastic, and
wire hanger, a rubber, fur, and leather glove, a plastic, Styrofoam, and paper cup; a wood, metal, and ceramic bowl, etc.
 The organizer used in this lesson can be drawn on a shower curtain and students can put their material and property words on it with
word cards to share.
Provided in grade level kit:
A wooden, metal, and plastic spoon for each pair of students
Set of three buttons made of three different materials per pair of students
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Page for Activity 8 as extention
I can tell the difference between material and a property.
Learning
I can tell about the properties of objects.
Target
Word Bank object, property, material
Teacher
Notes
Activity
Students will need help to distinguish between the use of an object, the material it is made of, and
properties of that object and how to sort by those things. Property is defined as a quality of an
object which can be measured or observed.
 Give each pair of students a set of spoons. Discuss how they are alike and how they are
different.
 Have student tell what all of the things have in common (they are all spoons). Begin a graphic
organizer such as the one below by writing spoons in the top box. Tell them all of the objects
are spoons, so “spoons” is the name for the objects.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
22
Object (e.g.
spoon)
Material (e.g.
metal)
Property (e.g.
hard)






Property (e.g.
shiny
Material (e.g.
plastic)
Property (e.g.
flexible)
Property (e.g.
white)
Material (e.g.
wood)
Property (e.g.
brown)
Property (e.g.
rough)
Ask students to tell if all of the spoons are made the same way. Ask them to tell what is
different about how they are made. Tell them they are made of different materials. Introduce
this word by adding it to the graphic organizer. Ask them to tell what materials each spoon is
made of. Add this to the chart.
Now ask students to describe each spoon and tell what it is like. List their observations of
each spoon under the properties. Tell students that the words that describe each spoon are
property words. Add the word property to the chart.
Give each group a set of buttons made of wood, plastic, and metal. Give each student a
graphic organizer and project one in front of the class. Ask students to tell what the objects are
that they have. Write “button” on the organizer. Those who are able can copy the word,
others can draw a picture.
Ask students to tell what material each button is made of. List responses on organizer and
have students copy if they can
Ask students to name properties of each button and list. If you do the graphic organizer on the
active board you can print out the one you make together for students to put in notebook.
Read over graphic organizer again.
Extension for students who are able: Give each group one of the sets of objects of different
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
23
materials and a graphic organizer. Have them work together to determine what the object is,
what materials they are made of, and what properties they have. Let each group present their
thinking using the document camera.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students can put their graphic organizers into their notebooks.
 Assessment- Listen as students give materials and property words for graphic organizer.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
Assessment
Do students continue to mix up materials and properties words?
There is a difference between the materials an object is made of and
its properties.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
24
BIG IDEA: Objects that are different types can still be sorted by their properties.
Activity # 9, Day 9 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
an envelope for each child with precut pictures or stickers (can we include in materials)
Provided in grade level kit:
10 kinds of objects (buttons, beans, scallop shells, wires, etc.)--8-10 of each
10 trays + one tray or dish per students for collecting
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Page for Activity 9
I can find properties that are the same in different objects.
Learning
I can use properties to sort many different objects.
Target
Word Bank
Teacher
Notes
Activity




Place 10 trays on a table. Put each kind of object on a separate tray. Give each student an
empty tray. Show students the number 5 and tell them they will select an object from five
different trays so they will have five different objects in their tray. Collect five objects for
your own dish.
Give them time to observe their objects and to describe them with each other.
Display an object from your collection and have students try to find an object from their
collection that is like my object or kind of the same as my object. Have students describe
properties of their selected object that make it similar to yours. Ask why all students don’t
have a similar object to yours.
Using the properties chart read property words and have students hold up objects with that
property. Call on individuals to tell other properties of the object they are holding. Add any
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
25
new words to the chart.
 Allow students to collect five more objects. If there aren’t enough on the trays, allow them to
use small objects from the classroom. Remind students of property categories like size, shape,
color and ask them to sort their objects by a category of their choice.
 Allow students time to sort and then have them find a partner and try to guess the category the
other used to sort.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students use 5-7 pre-cut pictures or stickers and sort them in some way, pasting
them in their notebooks. Those who can should label their categories, those who can’t should
tell their categories.
 Assessment- Observe students groups and ask them why they are sorting that way. Show
them a new object and ask where it would go and why. Use notebook page to assess.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
Assessment
Can students sort a variety of objects using a single category (e.g. color, flexibility, shape, etc.) or
do they choose different categories (they have a red group, a plastic group, and a group for things
with wheels)
In notebooks, do they know the difference between materials and properties? Do they sort by the
same category (color), or by different categories such as red and plastic?
Objects that are different types can still be sorted by their properties.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
26
BIG IDEA: Objects are made of materials that have particular properties and they can be
sorted by those properties.
Activity # 10, Day 10 and 11 (45 min./ day)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
plastic grocery bag per student (if collecting objects in classroom)
Word cards to label trays
Provided in grade level kit:
10 tray s
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Page for Activity 10
Learning
Target
I can tell about objects using their properties.
I can sort objects by their properties.
Word Bank object, property, sort
Teacher
Notes
Activity
The time for each student to present their favorite things and for each group to share their grouping
strategy may extend beyond the two 45 minute periods. You may want to let the individual
students share at different times, such as right before or after lunch or before home time over
several days.
 Have student collect about ten different objects. All ten should be able to fit into a grocery
bag. You can do this as a group and go outside for an object hunt (though this might take
more time.) You could write a note to parents and have the students bring their collection
from home, or you can have them collect items around the classroom. Discuss what types of
objects they might want to and be able to collect. List some possibilities under the heading
collect on a chart.
 Ask students to suggest objects they wouldn’t want to collect such as living things, and glass.
List these objects under the heading do not collect. Finally ask them to list some things they
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
27
can not collect such as trees, buildings, birds, etc. under the heading cannot collect.
 Return to the classroom and give each student a tray to spread out their objects. Give them
time to observe and discuss the properties of their objects with one another.
 Have students work in groups and put their collections together. Have them sort their
combined collections in some way.
 Each group can tell the class how they sorted. Each student in the group should also choose
their favorite object from the collection and tell what material it is made of and tell some
properties it has besides the one it was sorted by. Have the class visit each group to see how
their collection is sorted.
 Put out ten trays in an easily accessible place spread throughout the room. Ask a student to
select an object from his or her collection, name one of its properties, place that object on a
tray. Use an index card to label the tray with the chosen property. Repeat this procedure with
different students for the next 9 trays. Have students choose one object from their collection
that matches the property on one of the trays. They should go stand by the tray with their
property. Ask students why they are standing by that tray. If there is an object without any of
the listed properties, the student should stand away from the trays.
 Ask individuals if an object they placed on one tray could also be put on another tray. Ask
them to show which other tray it could be on and to tell why or to explain why it can’t be
placed on any other tray. If a student has an object they say can’t be put on any tray, have
them tell why.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students draw a picture of one of their objects and write the property word for the
tray they put it on. Then draw another object that could go on that same tray.
 Assessment- Having students share their favorite object and telling its material and properties
lets you know if the student understands the difference in material and property and if they can
identify properties that an object has. Asking each student to resort an object on the trays lets
you see if they are able to recognize that objects have more than one property and can be
sorted in different ways.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
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28
Objects are made of materials that have particular properties and
they can be sorted by those properties.
BIG IDEA: Size is a property of objects that can be compared used to put objects in order.
Activity # 11, Day 12 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
set of 3 objects (construction paper strips) of different lengths students can glue into notebooks with one other strip of a different length
to glue in later.
You will need to trim four of the sentence strips so they are different lengths.
Provided in grade level kit:
Set of 5 sentence strips that are the same but are different lengths (e.g., different lengths of string, different lengths of sticks, toy cars of
different lengths, etc.)
Set of 3 objects that are different and have different lengths
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
Page for Activity 11
I can put objects in order by looking at how long they are.
Learning
Target
Word Bank shortest, longest, length
Teacher
Notes
Activity

Show students a set of three sentence strips that are the same but are different lengths. Set the
objects out in random order. Ask the students to name some properties of the strips. Ask them
if all of the strips are the same. Ask if there is any property of them that is different.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
29

Once students say that they are different lengths ask students to think about which one is
shorter than all of the others. Show the word shorter. Ask how they know and have a student
prove it. Call on different students to find the longest strip and label it with longer. Have
them put the other strip in the middle so that they are in serial order from shortest to longest.
Ask a student to describe the order that they are in. Ask if there is a different way to put them
in order. Have students order them from longest to shortest.
 Show students another strip and ask them to think about where it would go in the order. Have
them talk to their partner about where they think the new strip would go. Have some students
tell where they think it should go and tell why. Do the same with another strip.
 Give each group of students a set of mixed objects that are different lengths. Have them order
their objects from shortest to longest. Have groups move around the room to check one
another’s order. Then have them order from longest to shortest and check.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Give students 3 strips of paper that are different lengths. Have them paste them in
their notebook in order. Those who can should copy a sentence that tells the order they are in
(The strings are in order from longest to shortest.)
 Assessment- Call students to order a group of things by length. In their notebooks, give them
another strip of paper that is a different length from the three they have and tell where it would
go and why.
Literature Connection
Is it Larger? Is it Smaller? Tana Hoban
Technology Connection
Assessment
When observed, is student able to order by length and identify whether the order is from longest to
shortest or shortest to longest?
In notebook, is student able to order the original three strips by length and identify the order? Are
they able to put the new strip in the appropriate place and identify why using relative length (It is
shorter than this and longer than this.)?
Size is a property of objects that can be compared used to put objects in
order.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
30
BIG IDEA: Objects have properties that can be explained and measured.
Activity # 12, Day 13 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Provided in grade level kit:
 Sets of 20 objects in baggies that are the same (e.g. coffee stirrers, popsicle sticks, spools, plastic spoons, pencils, .) enough sets so
each child has one set of something.
 paper clips (small metal ones)
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
 recording sheets for activity 12
 notebook page for activity 12
I can use objects to find out how long another object is.
Learning
Target
Word Bank shortest, longest, length, unit
Teacher
Notes
Activity

Recall how students ordered objects in the classroom by length. Show pictures and talk about
how they lined things up beside of each other. Tell students there are some other things in the
classroom that you would like to know which is longer and shorter. Point out some larger
and/or immobile objects such as a marker board, book case, table, etc. Ask students how we
could find out which of these is longer. (make sure the object isn’t longer than about 20 of the
objects the students will be using to measure, otherwise they won’t be able to manage them or
to count that high!)
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
31











If the students don’t suggest it, ask if they could use some of the objects in the bags to find out
which object is longer. Discuss what they could do with the stuff in the bags to find out how
long each of the objects is. Have students demonstrate their suggestions.
Vocabulary strategy for unit-Tell them the things in the bags will be their units and show the
word card for unit. Label each bag with the name of the object inside so students can copy the
word on their recording sheet for units and on their post it note. Discuss that whatever unit
they are measuring with should always be the same. Point out the word unit on their recording
sheet.
Let each student choose a set of units to measure with. Then have them record with words or
pictures what they will be measuring on their sheet, record what they will be measuring with
(their unit), and then go and measure.
As students measure, observe how they are lining up and counting their objects.
Have students bring their recording sheet and meet as a class to record results. On a chart for
each object measured, have students place a post-it note of their measurement and the unit
they measured with. Stress that you need to know what they measured with so you can
compare the measurements.
Talk about the chart and why there might be different numbers there. Sort the numbers by
type of measuring device. If the numbers are still different, talk about and demonstrate
different measuring techniques. Have students help you to develop a list of good measurement
techniques and make a chart of them. Work together using the good techniques to measure
each object until the class agrees on a pretty close measurement of each object. Determine the
order of the objects measured from longest to shortest or vice versa.
Talk about which objects were best to measure with and why.
Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to
keep the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
Center (optional): Leave objects out for students to measure other things with. Put more
recording sheets in a center so students can record what they measured and what they
measured with.
Notebook- Have students measure two lines on the notebook page for activity 12 with a small
paper clip and record their measurements.
Assessment- Observe students as they measure things throughout the room. Use notebook
page as assessment.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
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Literature Connection
Technology Connection
Assessment
Observations:
 Do students follow good measurement techniques?
 Do they record their measurements and units?
Notebook page:
 Do students follow good measurement techniques?
 Do they do what was agreed upon when they only need part of a paper clip?
 Do they record their measurements and units?
Objects have properties that can be explained and measured.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
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BIG IDEA: Properties can be used to describe objects.
Activity # 13, Day 14 (45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
Provided in grade level kit:
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
copies of hidden picture pages for each student
Learning
Target
Word
Bank
Teacher
Notes
I can use properties to tell about objects.
I can find objects using their properties.
Activity





Show students the I Spy site at http://www.scholastic.com/ispy/play/toystore/play_toystore.htm. If
you don’t have a projector, you can print out a picture and use the document camera or, if you have
the book you can use it with the document camera.
Point out objects and have students tell properties of the object you point out. Let students take turns
finding and describing objects in the picture.
Click on the rhyme and have students help search for the objects listed and have the finder describe
each object as it is found and give clues about where it is to other students.
Give students copies of different hidden picture pages (they don’t all have to be different). Let them
give clues to one another about where objects are and describe the objects to one another.
Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. Be sure to keep
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
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the chart for review tomorrow and to refer back to later.
 Notebook- Students can put their hidden pictures page in their notebook.
 Assessment- Listen as students describe things in their hidden pictures.
Literature Connection
I Spy Books from Scholastic
Notebook Connection- none for today
Technology Connection
Students can make their own I spy by dragging pictures onto a background.
http://www.scholastic.com/ispy/make/picture.asp#
The printable hidden pictures worksheets came from the following website:
http://www.highlightskids.com/GamesandGiggles/HiddenPics/HiddenPicsPrintable/h8hiddenArchive.asp
Assessment
Do students use property words as they describe the objects?
Properties can be used to describe objects.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
35
BIG IDEA: Properties can be used to describe objects.
Activity # 14 Day 15(45 min.)
Materials
Supplied by teacher:
You will need to make your own giant I spy page using cut outs from magazines and prepare some measurement clues
magazines and books that can be cut apart
scissors
glue
poster board or ½ sheets of chart paper
Provided in grade level kit:
objects to measure pictures with (paper clips, units from measuring activities)
To Run off From Notebook Pages:
I can use properties to tell about objects.
Learning
I can find objects using their properties.
Target
Word Bank
Teacher
Notes
Activity
Presentation of I spy pages may be made at different times, such as the time before/after
transitions, etc.
 Review the I Spy site at http://www.scholastic.com/ispy/play/toystore/play_toystore.htm Talk
about what makes the objects hard to find.
 Tell students they will make their own giant I Spy pages. Show them a sample you have
made. Give clues including measurements, size, shape, color, and texture to help students find
different objects on your page You may want to include measurements of the picture as well
as relative size of the real object, for example, you might have a picture of a tricycle and say,
“The picture of my object is 3 paper clips long, but the real object is about as big as your
desk.” This will serve as a model for students as they give clues.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
36

Let students work in groups of four to look through magazines to cut out pictures for their I
Spy pages.
 Each student should choose a picture from their page and give clues about it. It should include
measurement, size, shape, color, and texture. They write their clues on notebook page.
 When students finish, they present their page and clues to class.
 Meaning Making- complete What we did/What we learned chart with students. This
meaning making session can focus on the entire unit. Have students recall what they have
done throughout and what they have learned.
 Notebook- The clues page is their notebook entry. Use it to refresh their memory when it is
there time to present their I Spy page. They don’t have to have properties for every category,
but should have most. They may add others as well.
 Assessment- Listen as students describe things on their I Spy page. Use notebook page as
assessment.
Literature Connection
Technology Connection
I Spy site at http://www.scholastic.com/ispy/play/toystore/play_toystore.htm
Assessment
During presentation and on notebook page:
 Did students use property words to describe their hidden object?
 Did students use relative size and/or measurement to describe their hidden object?
 Did students use material words to tell about what the object was made of but not as
properties?
Properties can be used to describe objects.
Kindergarten 2/16/2016
37
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