Beginning Japanese I (JPN 101)

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Approved by Faculty Senate October 20, 2003.
University Studies Course Approval
Department or Program
JPN (Global Studies)
Course Number
102
Semester Hours
4
Frequency of Offering
every year
Course Title
Beginning Japanese II
Catalog Description
Continuation of JPN 101.
Prerequisite: JPN 101 or equivalent.
JPN 102 is designed to acquaint
students with grammatical structures
and vocabulary appropriate for
beginning learners. Instruction
focuses on development of all four
skills (speaking, listening, reading,
and writing) and cultural knowledge
This is an existing course previously approved
By A2C2
Approved by A2C2 (3/10/03
This is a new course proposal
No
(If this is a new course proposal, the WSU
Curriculum Approval Form must also be
Completed as in the process prescribed by
WSU Regulation 3-4)
see attached
Proposal Category:
Arts and Sciences Core—
Humanities
Department Contact
Yogesh Grover
Email Address:
[email protected]
JPN 102 (Global Studies)
Beginning Japanese II
University Studies – Arts and Sciences Core: Humanities Course
Catalog Description
Continuation of JPN 101. Prerequisite: JPN 101 or equivalent.
JPN 102 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary
appropriate for beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills
(speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge.
General Course Information
JPN 102 is one of the options for the Foreign Language and Cultural Immersion
requirement in the Asian Studies option of the Global Studies major. This is a course that
is designed to introduce students to the study of language as an expression of cultural
values and identity. Through the study of Japanese grammatical structures and
vocabulary, students will gain an understanding the relationship between culture and
language.
This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote students’
abilities to…
a. identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular
Humanities discipline;
b. understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions
and interpretations; and
c. understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical,
rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.
Rationale
USP Course Objective a) Students learn to identify and understand specific
elements and assumptions of a particular humanities discipline:
The student of beginning Japanese is introduced to the fundamentals of second language
learning. They learn how to identify and use grammatical structures in order to produce
syntactically correct Japanese sentences. As with many non-western languages, the study
of Japanese exposes students to the rigors of learning two scripts and kanji characters;
through this exposure, students learn first-hand about differences in writing systems and
the effect such systems have on expression. In this course, student are exposed to some
of the techniques for learning a second language: role playing through use of dialogues,
pattern drills, methods for remembering kanji characters, use of dictionaries, and
pronunciation drills.
USP Course Objective b) Students learn how historical context, cultural values,
and gender influence perceptions and interpretations:
Through an introduction to Japanese, students learn about some of the major changes that
have occurred in the development of Japanese in terms of spoken and written expression.
In order to use Japanese, they will have to learn about how language expression is shaped
by cultural values; for example, they will learn about how the collectivistic characteristics
of Japanese culture restrict the ability to express highly individualistic concepts. Since
selection of vocabulary and syntax is determined by gender, social class, and level of
familiarity, students will have to become familiar with the connection between culture
and language. Through a variety of speaking, listening, writing and reading exercises,
students will gain an understanding of the importance of understanding the characteristics
of language in order to use that language effectively.
USP Course Objective c) Students learn to understand the role of critical analysis
(e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical, rhetorical) in interpreting and
evaluating expressions of human experience.
An important element of learning Japanese will be the practice of translation exercises.
Students will have to use critical analysis skills in order to determine equivalent
vocabulary and syntactical structures in Japanese and English. They will come to realize
the difficulties of producing exact translations and will learn to make choices based on
the need to communicate effectively and in a manner that is aesthetically pleasing in
Japanese. They will come to understand that rhetorical patterns in Japanese are different
from those they are familiar with in English; they will have to learn to make choices and
adapt to a new set of aesthetic and rhetorical demands.
Beginning Japanese II (JPN 102)
Course Syllabus
Instructor:
Office: 133 Minne
Telephone: 507-457-2360
Email:[email protected]
Office Hours: M,T, W & H 1:00 P.M. – 2:00 P.M. and by appointment
Course Materials:
 Textbook: Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Vol. I
(The Japan Times, 2002)
 Workbook: Eri Banno, An Integrated Course in Elementary Japanese Genki. Vol. I
(The Japan Times, 2002)
 Genki Websites:
http://www.genki-online.com/
http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/hiragana.html (hiragana)
http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/katakana.html (katakana)


http://www.genki-online.com/kyozai/kanji by lesson.html (kanji)
Genki CD: on reserve in the library
Recommended Reference Materials:
English-Japanese/Japanese-English Learner’s Pocket Dictionary.
(Kenkyusha, 1996)
Nakamura, Y. and Yoshida, M. Furigana Japanese-English Dictionary.
Furigana English-Japanese Dictionary.
(Kodansha International, 1996)
Makino, S. and Tsutsui, M. A Dictionary of Basic Japanese Grammar.
(The Japan Times, 1994)
Course Description and Objectives:
Continuation of JPN 101. Prerequisite: JPN 101 or equivalent.
Japanese 102 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and
vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners. Lessons from 7 through 12 of Genki
Vol.1 are covered. Instruction will focus on the development of all four skills (speaking,
listening, reading, and writing), and cultural knowledge. Through a variety of
communicative activities, students will learn how to express their own ideas and to use
the language creatively both orally and in writing.
This is a University Studies Course that fulfills the Arts and Sciences Core—
Humanities. This course includes requirements and learning activities that promote
students’ ability to…
a. identify and understand specific elements and assumptions of a particular
Humanities discipline;
b. understand how historical context, cultural values, and gender influence perceptions
and interpretations; and
c. understand the role of critical analysis (e.g. aesthetic, historical, literary, philosophical,
rhetorical) in interpreting and evaluating expressions of human experience.
By the end of the course, the successful students will be able to do the following:
 Read and write approximately 100 new kanji characters.
 Understand basic Japanese grammar and its function
 Describe basic characteristic of people and things, make comparison, express
one’s hope and aspiration appropriately, explain reasons, talk about past
experiences, and make requests politely
 Pick up important information from various authentic materials
This class will be conducted primarily in Japanese.
Course outline of the major topics and subtopics:
I. Topic: Family Picture
A. Te-forms for describing continuous status
B. Te-forms for joining sentences
C. Verb stem + ni iku to describe a movement and its purpose
D. Counting people
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
II. Topic: Barbecue:
A. Short Forms and their uses
B. Asking someone to refrain from doing something
C Expressing one’s likes (doing something)
D. Subject Particle “ga”
E. something vs. anything
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
III. Topic: Kabuki
A. Past Tense Short Forms
B. Qualifying Nouns with Verbs and Adjectives
C. How to express “Have not yet done something.”
D. kara (since/because)
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
IV. Topic: Winter Vacation Plans
A. Making Comparison
B. Adjective/noun + no
C. Expressing one’s intention to do something
D. Adjective + naru
E. somewhere, anywhere, nowhere
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
V. Topic: After the Vacation
A. Describing one’s hope or aspiration
B. A tari, B tari (do such things as A and B)
C. Describing one’s past experience
D. A ya B (A and B for example)
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
VI. Topic: Feeling Ill
A ndesu form
B. Adjective/Verb + sugiru (too much, to excess)
C. Making suggestions
D. Use of “node”
E. Prohibition
F. Making a guess or a prediction
▪ USP course objectives (a, b, c.)
Attendance:
Because of the cumulative nature of language learning, it is essential that students keep
up with course work on a daily basis and attend all classes. If you miss more than five
class meetings, for each additional absence, you will lose your points towards your
attendance score. If you miss more than ten class meetings, you will automatically fail
this course.
If you have to miss class meetings for official class activities, medical or other legitimate
reasons, please contact the instructor in advance, and turn in an official letter that verifies
the reason for the absence.
Grading Policy:
Attendance and Class Participation
Homework Assignments
Project and Oral Test
Quizzes
Chapter Tests
Final Exam
15%
20%
10%
20%
20%
15%
90-100% = A 80-89% = B 70-79% = C
60-69% = D
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