H - University of Kent

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UNIVERSITY OF KENT
Programme Specification
BSc (Hons) Wildlife Conservation
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Awarding Institution/Body
Teaching Institution
Teaching Site
Programme accredited by:
Final Award
Programme
UCAS code (or other code)
Relevant QAA subject benchmarking
group/s
9. Date of production/revision
10. Applicable cohort/s
University of Kent
University of Kent at Canterbury
Canterbury
BSc (Hons)
Wildlife Conservation
ES3
7 November 2011
2012 stage II onwards
11. Educational Aims of the Programme
The programme aims and outcomes have references to the relevant subject benchmarking statements for
ES3 [Earth sciences, environmental sciences and environmental studies] (QAA 2007):
The programme aims to:
1. SB: Provide students with broad knowledge on the science and practicalities of wildlife conservation
with emphasis on the interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary links to biological, social and economic
disciplines.
2. SB: Acquaint students with theoretical issues, methods and practical tools relevant to understanding
and undertaking wildlife conservation, using both quantitative and qualitative approaches.
3. SB: Produce graduates equipped to play leading roles in the field of wildlife conservation for
employment and/or further study, with an understanding of sustainability and wildlife exploitation.
4. SB: Demonstrate to students the major issues of temporal and spatial scales of wildlife conservation
on local, national and international scales.
5. SB: Facilitate the educational experience of students through innovative opportunities for learning
during fieldwork.
6. SB: Ensure that the learning experience provides transferable skills necessary for professional
development, analytical problem-based solving, interpersonal development, autonomous practice and
team-working, in a manner which is efficient, reliable and enjoyable to students.
12. Programme Outcomes
The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and
understanding, qualities, skills and other attributes in the following areas. The programme outcomes
have references to the subject benchmarking statement for ES3 [Earth sciences, environmental sciences
and environmental studies].
Teaching/learning and assessment
methods and strategies used to enable outcomes to be
achieved and demonstrated
Knowledge and Understanding
A. Knowledge and understanding (ES3:
3.1, 3.4)
Methods and strategies to achieve outcomes involve
1. SB: Fundamental ecological and
specific modules that cover areas of knowledge and
biodiversity-related concepts and
understanding. Modules use a variety of approaches
how they apply to wildlife
enabling students to gain theoretical and practical
conservation.
understanding, through formal lectures, seminars,
1
2. Understanding of species, habitat
and landscape conservation and how
they relate to wildlife conservation.
3. SB: Practical understanding of
wildlife conservation.
4. SB: Principles of sustainable use and
wildlife management
5. Appreciating the relationship
between local communities and
wildlife conservation.
6. Issues and practices involved with
managing wildlife both within and
away from protected areas.
7. Understanding the role of
behavioural ecology in wildlife
conservation.
8. Genetics in wildlife conservation
issues.
9. SB: Wildlife laws and legislative
frameworks.
10. SB: Knowledge of the role that
statistics has in wildlife
conservation.
workskhops, laboratory exercises and fieldwork.
Most modules are assessed through a mixture of
coursework – including not only essays and written report
but also more practical tasks such as presentations and
mini-projects - and an unseen exam. Some modules are
assessed only by coursework.
Students undertake independent research projects (or in
special circumstances dissertation projects) beginning at the
end of the second year which they finish during their third
year. This allows students to understand the processes of
conducting independent research, such as: project design,
data collection, analysis, and write up. Students are
encouraged to select projects that are of special interest to
them in order to stimulate motivation.
Skills and Other Attributes (ES3: 3.7)
B.SB: Intellectual skills:
1. General learning and study skills
2. Critical and analytical skills
3. Ability to express ideas in writing
and orally
4. Design, implementation, analysis
and write-up of a research project
5. Ability to interpret scholarly
publications
6. Ability to formulate and test theories
7. Ability to make a structured and
logical argument
C. Subject-specific skills: (ES3: 3.73.11)
1. SB: Field biology skills (surveys,
sampling, etc.)
2. SB: Social science skills
(interviews, questionnaires, etc)
3. SB: Research design, statistics
4. SB: Skills for analysing and
appraising conservation case studies.
5. SB: Skills for environmental
education
6. SB: Skills to evaluate sustainability
of resource use
7. SB: Skills for management of
protected areas
Students are encouraged to engage critically during
seminars and lectures, and participate in group discussions,
hands-on participatory classroom and field activities,
simulations, brainstorming sessions, laboratory
demonstrations and role playing. Assignments are designed
to emphasise many of these skills and include presentations,
poster production, mini-projects, and other practical tasks.
In addition, research projects require considerable
organisational, analytical, study and writing skills, and
offers an opportunity for students to test concepts and
methods they have learnt during individual modules.
Students learn specific skills through fieldwork, practical
and analytical exercises in seminars, laboratory
demonstrations, role playing, written essays of real or
imaginary case studies, analysis of their own and preexisting datasets, and written reports of management and
conservation strategies. In addition, students learn specific
skills from research presentations given by visiting speakers
and postgraduate students.
Assessment of specific skills is done through written essays
and reports, posters, oral presentations, written unseen
examinations, mini-projects and research projects (or
dissertations).
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D. Transferable skills: (ES3: 3.103.12)
1. SB: Computer skills
2. SB: Presentation skills
3. SB: Report and proposal writing
4. SB: Time management
5. SB: Library skills
6. SB: Independent research skills
7. SB: Group work skills
Students learn transferable skills related to presentation,
writing, group work and time management during
coursework exercises involving essays, reports, debates,
and oral presentations of research results. Independent
research skills are developed through conducting, analysing
and writing research projects. Basic computing and
supplementary library training are available through the
university library and the Unit for Enhancement of Learning
and Teaching. Students are recommended to make use of
these facilities.
For more information on which modules provide which skills, see the module mapping.
13. Programme structures and requirements, levels, modules, credits and awards
The BSc in Wildlife Conservation provides a comprehensive training in both the natural science
aspects of conservation and also the human dimensions of conservation in order to provide an
integrate, interdisciplinary training in conservation theory and practice. Certificate modules (C)
are provided in the first year (stage 1) and give a common base line of interdisciplinary training
for all students, irrespective of previous qualifications and experience. Honours level (H)
modules in stages II and III students include a suite of core modules that address essential
knowledge and skills for wildlife conservation as a discipline, and additional recommended
modules on more specialist topics within the discipline.
For an Honours degree students must achieve a minimum of 360 credits of which no more than 120 may
be at the certificate level (C).
The programme is taken over 3 years full-time, 6 years part-time. A minimum of 120 credits must be
achieved per stage. In each academic year there are three terms. The first (Autumn) and second (Spring)
terms comprise 12 weeks each, and the third term (Summer) 6 weeks. Teaching takes place in the first
and second terms and exams in the third term.
Students usually take four 15 credit modules per term and are expected to divide their weekly workload
(calculated at a minimum of 40 hours work) evenly between all 4 modules, thus on average 10 hours per
module per week. Of these 10 hours at least 2 will usually be contact hours during which students will
be face to face with a member of staff either in lecture, seminar, workshop, laboratory or fieldwork.
Lectures are more formal talks and/or demonstrations, seminars are interactive sessions with students
(group discussions, role playing, brainstorming, etc.), workshops combine formal and interactive
elements, laboratory time includes hands-on activities in the laboratory, and fieldwork includes handson activities in the field (protected areas, field-based research projects, etc.).
Students can substitute modules from other programmes for non-core (recommended) modules with
approval from the programme convenor.
Code
Title
Year 1
Required Modules
Level
Credits
Term/s
DI305
SA303
C
15
1
C
30
1/2
Biodiversity
Social science introduction to the
environment
3
C
15
1
C
15
2
C
15
2
C
15
1
C
15
2
H
15
1
H
15
1
Conceptual frameworks in
H
conservation science
DI508
Conservation biology: methods and
H
research design
Recommended Modules
DI5xx
Human wildlife conflict and resource
H
competition
SE582
Comparative perspectives in primate
H
biology
DI503
Evolutionary Genetics and
H
Conservation
DI527
Practical guiding and interpretation
H
Plus the following recommended modules (odd years)
DI519
International biodiversity regulation
H
DI506
Tourism and conservation
H
And the following recommended modules (even years)
DI520
Conservation and communities
H
Optional Modules
XX000
Students can substitute recommended
modules for modules from other
programmes with approval from the
programme convenor
Year 3
Required Modules
DI518
Contemporary conservation science
H
DI522
Practical Research / Dissertation
H
Project
Recommended Modules
DI510
Global Biodiversity
H
DI501
Climate Change and Conservation
H
DI521
Species Conservation
H
DI5xx
Landscape ecology
H
SE580
Primate Behaviour and Ecology
H
Plus the following recommended modules (odd years)
DI519
International biodiversity regulation
H
DI506
Tourism and conservation
H
And the following recommended modules (even years)
15
2
15
2
15
1
15
1
15
2
15
2
15
15
1
2
15
2
15
30
1
1/2
15
15
15
15
15
1
1
2
2
2
15
15
1
2
SE308
Skills for Anthropology &
Conservation
DI311
The Green Planet
Recommended Modules
DI303
Surveying and Monitoring for
Biodiversity
DI310
Skills for Wildlife Conservation
and Management
SE306
Animals, People and Plants
Year 2
Required Modules
DI528
Conservation social science: methods
and practice
DI5xx
Spatial Analysis in wildlife
conservation: Principles and Methods
DI505
4
DI520
Conservation and communities
Optional Modules
XX000
Students can substitute recommended
modules for modules from other
programmes with approval from the
programme convenor
H
15
2
14. Support for Students and Their Learning
First year students have access to an online School handbook giving details of the facilities available and
general administrative arrangements. They also attend an induction session on arrival in Kent that is
specifically about their degree programme. There are additional face-to-face sessions with staff at key
stages throughout the programme to direct their progress, including during the spring term of Stage I on
module choices for stages II and III, and at the beginning of each subsequent stage.
The School prides itself on the close rapport between staff and students and the accessibility of staff to
students. All members of staff keep special office hours during the week for any student who wishes to
consult them. In addition, students are assigned a tutor from their initial registration who is available to
provide support throughout their time at the university. In addition to the academic staff there are
administrative staff who are responsible inter alia as a first point of enquiry for assisting students.
The university also provides the following central support services:
 A Medical Centre on the campus of the university
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A Disabilities and Dyslexia Support Unit
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The Unit for Enhancement of Learning and Teaching which offers short sessions on study skills
as well as individual advice.
A counselling service for students facing personal difficulties.
A Careers Office.
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The School has its own computer room equipped with computers for student use. These are in addition
to the computers available for general use of students in common areas such as the library. One member
of staff is a technical officer responsible for IT provision within the School.
There is a laboratory equipped with microscopes, various measuring devices and biological specimens
for use during laboratory demonstrations and student research projects.
For the students’ final year research projects, staff offer a range of topics linked to their own study sites
and research interests. In addition to staff supervision, students have access to academic support and
advice for their projects through the university statistics helpdesk and also through a School helpdesk
manned by PhD students. Fieldwork may be either in the UK or abroad.
The library is provisioned with text-books, journals, and monographs relevant to Wildlife Conservation.
New books are regularly ordered so staff and students can keep up to date with developments in the
discipline.
15. Entry Profile
Entry Route
For fuller information, please refer to the University prospectus.
You must be at least 17 years old by 20 September in the year you begin your programme. There is no
upper age limit to studying.
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Offer levels:
A level ABB, IB Diploma 33 points overall OR 16 points at Higher
Required subjects:
GCSE English Language and Mathematics grade C
A level natural science (eg, Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Science, Geography) grade B
or above
IB Diploma HL English A1/A2/B at 4/5/5 or SL English A1/A2/B at 5/6/6, Maths at 4 and HL
Biology, Geography, Environmental Science or Chemistry at 5 or SL Biology, Geography,
Environmental Science or Chemistry at 6
In exceptional circumstances, we may consider promising candidates who do not have the
formal entrance requirements but who have obtained several years of relevant experience or
other qualifications in the subject area.
International students can also qualify for entry with school certificates and higher school
certificates awarded by a body approved by the University. If English is the student’s second
language they must demonstrate proficiency in English.
What does this programme have to offer?
 An interdisciplinary approach to wildlife conservation at local, national and international levels.
 A broad range of skills that are valuable in a wide variety of careers related to conservation biology
and environmental resource management.
 Research-led teaching by staff who are internationally recognised Hands-on learning, including the
opportunity to conduct research in the tropics.
Personal Profile
Wildlife conservation is at the cutting edge of global conservation and is critical for the future survival
of species and landscapes. The management of protected areas, private lands, communal property, and
other land uses depends on wildlife conservation and management to maintain the natural ecosystems.
The human dimensions of wildlife conservation are fundamental, and include such issues as hunting,
fishing, and saving endangered species, to mention a few. The biological role of wildlife is equally as
important and includes such issues as seed dispersal, grassland maintenance, and food chain dynamics.
But wildlife conservation will only succeed if the human dimensions are incorporated with the biology.
This interdisciplinary approach is used in this degree and sets this programme apart from other similar
programmes.
16. Methods for evaluating and enhancing the quality and standards of teaching and learning
Mechanisms for review and evaluation of teaching, learning, assessment, the curriculum and
outcome standards
 Written student evaluations of each module and of the programme
 Formal assessment results
 Staff-student interactions during supervision sessions, formal teaching, staff-student committee, and
informal meetings
 External examiner’s reports and School responses
 Discussion in committees listed below
 Annual report
Committees with responsibility for monitoring and evaluating quality and standards
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 School Examiners’ Board
 DICE Academic Committee
 Staff / student consultative committee
 Social Science Faculty Learning and Teaching Committee
Mechanisms for gaining student feedback on the quality of teaching and their learning experience
 Staff/ student consultative committee
 Written student evaluations of modules, workshops/seminars, and research projects
 Staff-student interactions during supervision sessions, formal teaching, committees (above), and
informal meetings
 Student representation on School Committees
Staff development priorities include:
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Research seminars
Development of collaborative research activities
Research / teaching links to conservation and biodiversity management
Postgraduate Certificates in Higher Education and/or member of the Institute for Learning and
Teaching
17. Indicators of quality and standards
 Regular funding of research and training activities by a variety of international conservation
agencies
 Members of staff sit on nationally and internationally recognised boards, committees, and journals
related to conservation biology and wildlife conservation and management
The following reference points were used in creating these specifications:
 University Mission Statement
 School Mission Statement
 DICE Mission Statement
 University Learning and Teaching Strategy
 Learning and Teaching Board Guidance Notes
 Prior module and programme documentation
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