Newspaper Book Review Format

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Newspaper Book Review Format
a)
b)
c)
d)
Introduction. Try to open with a lively or touching quote. Include some interesting
comment about the author’s biography or the circumstances that prompted the writing
of the books. (Almost every review of Frank McCourt’s memoir, Angela’s Ashes,
mentioned his remarkable life, usually in the opener.)
Brief plot summary. It’s not a book report so don’t flood the reader with too many
details, and if it’s fiction, don’t give away the ending! Instead, wrap up the plot
summary in just a paragraph or two. Include the setting, characters, and conflict.)
Your opinion. Discuss on the theme (the statement that the story makes about human
nature or life), the way the story is told (timeline, diary, and flashbacks), and the voice
of the book (point of view, mood, personality of the narrator, tone). Did the author do
a good job? Did it move you? Did you learn something valuable? Above all, should your
audience read it? Remember, this is why he or she is reading the review, so don’t
hesitate to offer your honest opinion. And don’t worry about writing a negative review
of a well-known author’s work¾your obligation is to the audience, not the author
(Darraj 21, 22).
You must include a bibliography at the end of each book review. A bibliography gives
credit to the author(s). In Language Arts we will use the MLA guide to style. Because
we are using MLA your bibliographies for a book with one author must include the
following:
1.
Author’s name, last name first.
2. Title of the book.
3. City where book was published.
4. Publishing company.
5. Copyright date.
A completed bibliography of a book with one author looks like this:
Rowling, J. K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic Press, 2000.
Book reviews should not be more than two or three pages and even three pages is
verging on too much. Take a look at book reviews in the newspaper or a magazine. They are
thorough and complete; they are just long enough, but not too skimpy; quality not quantity
matters. In short, every word counts. Book reviewers don’t use extra words just to take up
space.
Newspaper Book Review Format
e)
f)
g)
h)
Introduction. Try to open with a lively or touching quote. Include some interesting
comment about the author’s biography or the circumstances that prompted the writing
of the books. (Almost every review of Frank McCourt’s memoir, Angela’s Ashes,
mentioned his remarkable life, usually in the opener.)
Brief plot summary. It’s not a book report so don’t flood the reader with too many
details, and if it’s fiction, don’t give away the ending! Instead, wrap up the plot
summary in just a paragraph or two. Include the setting, characters, and conclict.)
Your opinion. Discuss on the theme (the statement that the story makes about human
nature or life), the way the story is told (timeline, diary, and flashbacks), and the voice
of the book (point of view, mood, personality of the narrator, tone). Did the author do
a good job? Did it move you? Did you learn something valuable? Above all, should your
audience read it? Remember, this is why he or she is reading the review, so don’t
hesitate to offer your honest opinion. And don’t worry about writing a negative review
of a well-known author’s work¾your obligation is to the audience, not the author
(Darraj 21, 22).
You must include a bibliography at the end of each book review. A bibliography gives
credit to the author(s). In Language Arts we will use the MLA guide to style. Because
we are using MLA your bibliographies for a book with one author must include the
following:
6. Author’s name, last name first.
7. Title of the book.
8. City where book was published.
9. Publishing company.
10. Copyright date.
A completed bibliography of a book with one author looks like this:
Rowling, J. K. Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. New York: Scholastic Press, 2000.
Book reviews should not be more than two or three pages and even three pages is
verging on too much. Take a look at book reviews in the newspaper or a magazine. They are
thorough and complete; they are just long enough, but not too skimpy; quality not quantity
matters. In short, every word counts. Book reviewers don’t use extra words just to take up
space.
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