Heritage & Conservation Areas

advertisement
Heritage
& Conservation Areas
Contents:
Objection statement
Supporting documents:
 English Heritage guidance setting-heritage-assets
 Local Heritage Report (D Chahal & C Beadle)
(bound separately)
Introduction.
The proposed turbine site is located at the heart of a rich and varied heritage landscape:
 Upper Broughton and Hickling are both conservation villages
 Within a 5,000 metre (5km) radius of the turbine site the applicant has
identified 140 designated heritage assets; an indication of the richness of the
heritage environment.
 The Churches of Upper Broughton and Hickling are both grade 1 listed and
the church of Nether Broughton is grade 2 listed.
 A significant number of these properties & assets will be in view of the
turbine (either to or from) and the turbine will form part of the wider view
encompassing all of these properties (both for residents and for people
moving through the area).
 Listed properties such as Dell farm on Green Lane and White House in Upper
Broughton are within approx. 600m of the proposed site and will be affected
by the full visual impact of the development
 (photographs in separate Visualisations document & below)
(English Heritage Guidance notes are attached, giving details of definitions and
considerations when planning developments within a heritage setting. See also, Planning
Policy References section for the relevant planning guidance for heritage issues.)
Natural England:
 “The landscape that we see today is a product of its historical evolution, reflecting
the underlying physical resource and the changing nature of human exploitation of
the land. The landscape will, of course, continue to change and evolve, reflecting
the changing priorities and demands that society places on it. Over recent decades,
however, these priorities and demands have often degraded rather than improved
the fabric of the landscape. There is now a general consensus that positive action is
needed to reverse this trend, and that this should place a high value on conserving
and enhancing the inherent character and diversity of our landscapes.”
 “Cultural heritage is evident in the Trent and Belvoir Vales NCA with the overall
settlement pattern little changed since medieval times.”
 “… the area’s villages are generally small with a finely balanced historic character
that could be affected by even small amounts of inappropriate development.” (Leics
& Notts Wolds NCA)
The heritage landscape is overwhelmingly rural in character and horizontal in scale with the
highest buildings tending to be local Churches with Belvoir Castle visible in the distance.
 The degree to which an industrial structure on this scale and sited at the summit of
Belvoir Ridge would intrude on the overall landscape is explained in more detail in
the landscape section.

However, an extremely significant characteristic of this landscape and one of the
main reasons that it should be protected, relates to its heritage characteristics; a
rural/farmed countryside and settlements which have evolved harmoniously over
centuries and certainly since mediaeval times:
(Natural England): “Red brick buildings with pantile roofs are widespread and
most abundant clustered around churches, which are constructed from
ironstone and limestone contributing to the local vernacular.”
It is the combination of designated and non-designated heritage assets which continue to
exist within an environment retaining its overall landscape and heritage integrity which is of
most significance when considering the impact of a new and dominant industrial structure
on a prominent site and visible for such extended distances.
 The impact on individual highly significant heritage sites is extremely important
 But of greater significance is the undermining nature of this proposal on the overall,
wider character of the heritage landscape which exists around these individual sites
and provides an on-going valuable setting that should be preserved and actively
protected.
It is for this reason that we would urge you to refuse the current application.
(cont’d overleaf)
An example:
A striking example of the heritage links across and within this landscape can be seen in the
relationship between the churches of St. Luke’s Upper Broughton and, across a small valley,
St. Mary’s Nether Broughton.
Both built in traditional local materials and small in scale, they have looked across at each
other for centuries, linking the two communities on the same East to West line and
characterising the heritage of the area in a way that words don’t do justice to:
Photographs showing the Old Rectory and St. Mary’s Nether Broughton (to the left of the
Old Rectory and partially behind the trees during summer months) taken from the garden of
a house neighbouring Upper Broughton Church (pictured at the end of the sequence).
From the other direction, photographs have been taken from the garden of the Old Rectory
and from the churchyard in Nether Broughton:
If approved, the turbine will become a third landmark in line with these two beautiful
churches and representing an over-powering industrial presence within this beautiful and
centuries old setting.
Attached in a separate folder is a Heritage Report compiled by local
historians Mrs D Chahal and Mrs C Beadle:
1. Refers to specific issues arising from the applicant’s heritage report
and planning statement but also includes an overview of the heritage
of the locality
2. Appendices; additional information and photographs exploring the
heritage of the locality in more detail.
Planning Guidance.
National Planning Policy Framework:
 (p6) “conserve heritage assets in a manner appropriate to their significance, so that
they can be enjoyed for their contribution to the quality of life of this and future
generations;”
 (p30) “a positive strategy for the conservation and enjoyment of the historic
environment … In doing so, they should recognise that heritage assets are an
irreplaceable resource and conserve them in a manner appropriate to their
significance”
o The impacted landscape is a rich heritage environment with a centuries-old
vernacular maintain its integrity through to modern times.
 (p31) “The effect of an application on the significance of a non-designated heritage
asset should be taken into account in determining the application. In weighing
applications that affect directly or indirectly non designated heritage assets, a
balanced judgement will be required having regard to the scale of any harm or loss
and the significance of the heritage asset.”
o Although there are significant heritage assets impacted in their own right, the
heritage character of the wider area is also of high significance; within this
non-designated heritage assets contribute to this overall character. Of
particular interest are two houses neighbouring the proposed site; High
Holborn and Sycamore Lodge, both sensitively and extensively renovated to
preserve their original integrity.
Rushcliffe Local Plan (pt2 Environment):
2.8. “In considering planning applications the Borough Council will pay special attention to
the desirability of preserving or enhancing the character or appearance of the conservation
area as required by the Planning (Listed Building and Conservation Area) Act 1990. The
character of different areas and sites may need different consideration. PPG 15 states
"Special regard should be had for such matters as scale, height, form, massing, respect for
the traditional pattern of frontages, vertical or horizontal emphasis, and detailed design."”
o The character and appearance of the affected conservation areas are of
particular concern in the context of the industrial nature and huge vertical
scale of the proposed turbine.
2.8.EN2: “PLANNING PERMISSION FOR DEVELOPMENT INCLUDING … WITHIN A DESIGNATED
CONSERVATION AREA, OR OUTSIDE OF BUT AFFECTING ITS SETTING, OR VIEWS INTO OR
OUT OF THE CONSERVATION AREA WILL ONLY BE GRANTED WHERE:
a) THE PROPOSAL WOULD PRESERVE OR ENHANCE THE CHARACTER OR APPEARANCE OF
THE CONSERVATION AREA BY VIRTUE OF ITS USE, DESIGN, SCALE, SITING AND MATERIALS;
o The proposed turbine is not in keeping with the existing character of views
from and towards the affected conservation areas and its industrial nature is
not of a style which would enhance this character.
2.14. EN4: PROPOSALS FOR DEVELOPMENT AFFECTING THE SETTING OF A LISTED
BUILDING, WILL ONLY BE PERMITTED WHERE THEY ARE ACCEPTABLE IN TERMS OF SCALE,
MASSING, FORM, SITING, DESIGN AND MATERIALS.
o The proposed turbine is not in keeping with the existing character of settings
affecting listed buildings and its industrial nature is not of a style or scale
which would enhance this character.
2.16. “PPG 16 makes clear that the desirability of preserving an ancient monument and its
setting is a material consideration in determining planning applications, whether the
monument is scheduled or unscheduled. Government guidance in PPG16 indicates that
development that would affect an Scheduled Ancient Monument or other significant
archaeological remains should be considered very carefully in order to protect the nations
cultural heritage. Such sites are part of the heritage of Rushcliffe and are important not only
for their own sake, but also for education, tourism and leisure purposes. The Borough
Council is therefore keen to protect such sites from development.”
2.17. “Development affecting scheduled Ancient Monuments and their settings will be
subject not only to planning approval, but also to Scheduled Ancient Monument Consent,
which is administered directly by the Secretary of State. The Borough Council will not grant
planning permission for any proposal which would detrimentally affect scheduled Ancient
Monuments and their settings.”
o 2.16 & 2.17 are relevant because the wider setting of a range of scheduled
monuments will be affected by a change of character in the area brought
about the industrialisation & potential proliferation associated with this wind
turbine application; added consequence is attached to the potential for devaluing an area with an established visitor and tourist profile.
EN6 – ANCIENT MONUMENTS
PERMISSION WILL NOT BE GRANTED FOR DEVELOPMENT WHICH WOULD DESTROY OR
DETRIMENTALLY AFFECT SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENTS OR THEIR SETTINGS.
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards