Aaron edits 2

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Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
1
ESL DEFINITION
“English language learners (often referred to as ESL students) are
those whose primary language, or languages, of the home are
other than English. For this reason, they require additional
services in order to develop their individual potential within British
Columbia’s school system. “
- from ESL Policy Framework Ministry of Education, 1999
Over the past ten years, the number of students identified as needing ESL
services in BC has more than tripled. Lower Mainland school districts have
been especially affected, and educators in those districts have had to
develop skills and processes to address the growing need. (BC Ministry ESL
Learners: Guide for Teachers, 2009)
The BC Ministry of Education’s 2009 Policy and Guidelines Document for
English as a Second Language says, “The purpose of ESL services is to assist
students to become proficient in English, to develop both intellectually and
as citizens, and to achieve the expected learning outcomes of the provincial
curriculum. These services should be provided in BC school communities that
value diversity, bridge cultures, and work to eliminate racism.”
STUDENT DESCRIPTION
Clay is a Korean international student who is beginning his third year in a
Canadian Secondary School. He has completed both grades 8 and 9 and is
currently in his 10th year of study. Clay has just recently been moved from
the grade 9 ESL program to the regular grade 10 English class. He is soft
spoken and does not contribute to class discussions. When he is asked to
answer a question, Clay often replies with one-word answers.
Clay demonstrates good ideas in his writings but his grammar is not up to
grade 10 English level and he often wrongly places or omits articles like ‘the’
and ‘a’. Clay also does not bring a book to read during silent reading and is
often on his iphone or engaging in another quiet activity.
As with other students in the class, Clay hands in sub-par work and often
hands things in late or half finished.
Clay is also currently trying out for the basketball team.
Clay lives with a homestay family as his parents live in Korea. His homestay
parents are from Germany and have one other student who lives with them.
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
2
DESIGNATION
For a student to be identified as an English language learner, an assessment
of English language proficiency must be carried out. Initial assessments will
typically be conducted upon a student’s first arrival at school but may be
conducted at any point if there is an indication that there might be a need
for ESL services.
Initial assessment should be designed to gather information on the students:
• English proficiency (or in the Conseil scolaire francophone de la ColombieBritannique, French proficiency: http://www.csf.bc.ca/) and experience in all
areas of language development: listening, speaking, reading, and writing
(representing and viewing may also contribute to assessment of language
proficiency);
• Previous schooling (e .g.,report cards if available; information on
interruptions to schooling);
• Language(s) and/or dialect(s) spoken at home;
• Proficiency in his or her first language – listening, speaking, reading,
viewing, writing, representing; where documentary evidence and information
from parents are insufficient, assessment of a student’s first-language
proficiency may be required, of available;
• Basic language and content skills in academic subject areas (e .g .,
mathematics); and
• Possible needs other than ESL services (e .g . support services for special
needs, trauma counselling, services of a settlement worker) .
The assessment should be relevant to the student’s age, taking into account
the student’s academic, cultural, and social/emotional needs. Assessment of
English proficiency should consider cultural and linguistic diversity (for
example, should avoid requiring cultural knowledge) and be nondiscriminatory. The assessment should also consider both the language
performance and classroom functioning of the learner. Initial assessments of
English language should include, but are not limited to a combination of the
following approaches:
• A test of English language proficiency;
• Oral interviews (with students, parents);
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
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• Reviews of students’ oral and unedited written language samples as
appropriate
• Assessments of students’ reading and listening comprehension
Use of standardized tests can yield helpful information, but these should not
be the sole basis for making an initial assessment
A language proficiency assessment should be documented at least annually
for English language learners to determine progress and eligibility for ESL
funding. School districts may receive supplemental funding from the Ministry
of Education for eligible students needing ESL or FLS support, and these
students should be reported to the ministry as part of the Regular Enrolment
report. Students are eligible for funding for up to five school years and must
receive the service consistently throughout the ten months of each school
year.
INDIVIDUAL EDUCATION PLAN (IEP) SECONDARY
STUDENT'S LAST NAME
GIVEN NAMES
Lee
DATE OF BIRTH
Clay
__1996_/___07__/___24___
YY
MM
DD
STREET ADDRESS
CITY
3222 MacRae Ave
Victoria
GRADE
PROVINCE
BC
POSTAL
CODE
NAME OF SCHOOL
V8P 5G9
GUARDIANS
Valentina and Chrisitian Supovatek
FUNDING
CATEGORY
DATE ESTABLISHED
March 22, 2011
10
MacRae Secondary
HOME PHONE 250- 555-5555
WORK PHONE 778-555-5555
IMPORTANT MEDICAL/SOCIAL INFORMATION
-
No known medical issues
Student does not socialize with non Korean speakers
Quiet and Introverted during classroom discussions
REVIEW DATE
June 1, 2011
LONG TERM REVIEW
June 25th, 2011
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
4
CURRENT LEVEL OF PERFORMANCE
ACADEMIC:
Clay attends all subjects other than math inconsistently. In addition, Clay’s often late and
incomplete classwork impoverishes his achievement below his true ability.
Assessment reveals the following levels of proficiency:
Writing
Burnaby South Benchmarks rubric indicates a Level One Middle score (out of two) for
writing ability
Genre Analysis also suggests a low L2 score in writing
Written Language Matrix (Richmond SD) indicates a Level 2 score (out of four) in writing
Reading
Comprehension (Woodcock) suggests an Developing category for reading ability (out of
Emerging, Beginning, Developing, Expanding, Proficient, and Fluent).
Oral
Prototype Oral Interview (O’Malley, M & L Valdez-Pierce) suggests Developing category
for speaking and listening (out of Emerging, Beginning, Developing, Expanding, Proficient,
and Fluent).
Analytic Oral Language Scoring Rubric also indicates Developing category.
BEHAVIOUR:
Clay is socially withdrawn from non-Korean speakers, thus far not involved in extracurricular activities
SOCIAL:
Clay’s parents are living in Korea. His homestay parents are busy and not involved in
tracking homework progress at this time.
CURRENT STRENGTHS
Clay has above average math skills.
Clay enjoys playing basketball and has attempted to try out for an extra-curricular activity.
Clay is respectful of his peers and teachers.
SUMMARY OF BASIC NEEDS
Writing
Clay needs to expand his vocabulary to better communicate his ideas.
Clay needs to include logical sequence in his written works and fill in more detail to develop
main ideas.
Clay needs to include greater use of the three simple tenses (past, present, future).
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
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Clay needs to include subordination as well as coordination in longer sentences.
Clay needs to include missing words, reduce punctuation and capitalization errors, and
eliminate sentence fragments.
Reading
Clay needs to work on reading English texts independently
Clay needs opportunity to read aloud in independent and pull-out sessions.
Clay needs to work on “reading between the lines” of the text he read (i.e. Clay must show
the ability to draw appropriate inferences from the work).
Oral
Clay needs to work on sustaining conversations and initiating communication in the
classroom.
Clay needs to pre-think ideas to reduce the need for speech hesitations and rephrasing for
greater fluency.
Clay needs to increase the use of other tenses than the present and reduce errors of
omission (leaving words out and endings off) to improve on structure.
Clay needs to expand his vocabulary and minimize word usage errors.
Clay needs to focus on classroom discussion, recognize when he is not understanding, and
request rephrasing or repetition to improve his listening skills.
LONG TERM OBJECTIVES
Christopher will attend math and science classes.
Christopher will develop a greater independence in the application of compensatory
strategies for arithmetic operations and computations.
Christopher will understand and be able to carry out operations involving regrouping,
decimals, and fractions.
GOALS, SHORT TERM OBJECTIVES AND INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES
Goal: Christopher will improve attendance and organization.
Objective: Christopher will attend math and science class, and bring the appropriate materials with
him.
Strategies: Christopher’s parents will provide him with a different colored binder for each subject,
and he will bring the appropriate one with him to class.
Evaluation: Mrs Hoover will record Christopher’s attendance and communicate with his other
teachers
Goal: Christopher will improve his ability to perform arithmetic operations.
Objective: Christopher will be able to translate arithmetic problems into words, and describe what
needs to be done to find the solution.
Strategies: Christopher will learn which symbols represent which arithmetic operations, and in
which direction they are operating. Christopher will also be taught the CRA method (concrete-torepresentational-to-abstract) to help move Christopher from concrete to abstract problems.
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
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Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will evaluate Christopher’s success using arithmetic operations on tests
and assignments.
Goal: Christopher will reduce the number of computational and place value errors in his work.
Objective: Christopher will double-check his calculations before handing in assignments or tests.
Strategies: Christopher will review his work from the bottom up, putting check marks next to steps
he agrees with.
Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will verify that Christopher is reviewing his work, and look for concepts
with which Christopher is showing improvement and those which need more work.
Goal: Christopher will add and subtract numbers, including decimals, using the column method
Objective: Christopher will successfully add and subtract numbers, including decimals.
Strategies: Christopher will use the column method to help organize addition and subtraction
procedures.
Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will decide whether using the column method helps Christopher with
addition and subtraction by looking at his daily homework assignments and quizes.
Goal: Christopher be able to regroup units into different powers of ten.
Objective: Christopher will successfully add or subtract numbers by regrouping units.
Strategies: In a pull-out session Christopher will practice regrouping using color tiles with Mr
Largo.
Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will verify proper use of regrouping to add or subtract numbers on tests
and assignments.
Goal: Christopher will confidently add and subtract numbers.
Objective: Christopher will demonstrate addition and multiplication with base 10 blocks.
Strategies: In a pull-out session Christopher will practice addition and multiplication with base 10
blocks with Mr Largo.
Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will evaluate effectiveness of addition and multiplication on tests and
assignments when Christopher is able to use base 10 blocks during the test.
Goal: Christopher will understand and demonstrate place value in multiplication and division
questions
Objective: Christopher will use the explicit trade method of division and the lattice multiplication
method.
Strategies: In a whole class session these methods will be taught to all students and then during
individual homework time, teacher will work to clarify process with Christopher. Christopher will
show all work when doing these operations.
Evaluation: Mrs. Kerbople will evaluate the effectiveness of these methods on homework
assignments and if extra explanations are needed will suggest that Christopher will come spend a
lunch time with Mrs. Kerbople.
Goal: Christopher will be able to translate verbal, concrete, and written representations of
fractions, and to use them in arithmetic operations.
Objective: Christopher will be able to demonstrate his understanding of fractions using fraction
tiles.
Strategies: Christopher will learn which components of fraction tiles correspond to numerators
and denominators, how to represent a fraction as a presentation of fraction tiles, and vice versa. He
will then use fraction tiles to help with arithmetic operations.
Evaluation: Mrs Krebople will verify Christopher’s ability to perform calculations with fractions on
homework assignments, quizzes and tests.
TEAM MEMBERS
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
7
TEAM MEMBER'S NAME
POSITION/AGENCY
ROLE
1. Mr. Horton
Principal
Approve IEP
2. Mrs. Parker
English teacher
3. Ms. Ito
Social Studies teacher
4. Mrs. Chiquita
Homeroom teacher
5. Mary
Tutor
6. Mr. & Mrs .Lee
parents
7.Clay Lee
student
Use best practices for ESL learners in
class. Communicate with parents.
Provide in class adaptations when
necessary.
Use best practices for ESL learners in
class. Communicate with parents.
Provide in class adaptations when
necessary.
Record attendance and communicate
between Clay’s teachers
Help Clay with homework and oral
and written English practice after
school.
Work with Clay at home (to the best
of their ability) to ensure he is
getting his homework done.
Attend class, and participate in all
activities. Do as much of his
homework as he can, and attend
extra English tutoring sessions after
school.
REFERENCES
Beardsmore, Boe. Exploring ESL: specialist teacher preparation and professional development in
British Columbia, UVic Master’s Thesis, 2008.
Carrasquillo, A .L. and V. Rodriguez. 2002. Language minority students in
the mainstream classroom (2nd ed.). Clevedon, England: Multilingual
Matters.
Ferguson, R. F. (2001). Cultivating new routines that foster high achievement for all
students: How researchers and practitioners can collaborate to reduce the minority
achievement gap. Education Research, 19(4), 34.
Garnett, Bruce, An introductory look at the academic trajectories of ESL students, Department of
Educational Studies, University of British Columbia, 2008.
Wong-Fillmore, L. & Snow, C.E. (2000). What teachers need to know about language.
Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Language and Linguistics.
ESL Learners: A Guide for Classroom Teachers
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/esl/policy/classroom.pdf
ESL Learners: A Guide for ESL Specialists
www.bced.gov.bc.ca/esl/policy/special.pdf
Alex Gillett
Aaron Conway
(Alexander) Brendan Frey
Mary Klovance
ED-D 420
8
About Teaching to Diversity: ESL, Learning Assistance, Special Education
http://bctf.ca/IssuesInEducation.aspx?id=10568
ESL Teacher Professional Organizations
http://www.bctf.ca/psas/ESLPSA/professional_organizations.html
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