Module5bETCMasterSafelandModules9910

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Onshore Orientation &
Emergency Evacuation
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
 Onshore Orientation is an overview of
what is required of employees while
working on a land location.
 This section will cover many individual
topics relative to your safety and work
environment.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Emergency Evacuation
• The immediate and rapid movement of
people away from the threat and
immediate danger.
• Emergency evacuation should be
planned prior to any type of emergency
that could exist in your field of
operation.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Emergency Evacuation
 All employees shall be trained and familiar
with the emergency evacuation program.
 The program shall be displayed in an
accessible area for all employees.
 Keep all exits clear of obstructions.
 Know your assembly point in the event of
an evacuation.
 Be familiar with the company notification
protocol.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Industrial Hygiene
 Industrial Hygiene is the evaluation of
environmental factors through
measurement of exposure intensity,
exposure frequency, and duration.
 A Hygienist is a person who by study,
training, and experience can: anticipate,
recognize, evaluate and control
workplace environmental hazards.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Hazards
 Air contaminates: dusts, fumes, mists,
aerosols and fibers.
 Chemical agents: solids, liquids, gases,
mists, dust, fumes and vapors.
 Biological hazards: viruses, fungi, and
other living organisms.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Hazards
 Physical hazards: excessive levels of
ionizing and non-ionizing electromagnetic
radiation, noise, vibration, illumination,
and temperature.
 Ergonomic hazards: including but not
limited to lifting, holding, pushing,
walking, and reaching.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
 Worksite analysis is a good way to find and
eliminate job hazards that may exist on your
worksite.
 If hazards cannot be completely eliminated,
there are steps that can be taken to monitor
the situation and minimize risk and control
the hazard.
 Machine guarding
 Changing work practices
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
 If you cannot eliminate or control the hazard,
protect yourself with PPE.
 Remember that PPE does not remove the
risk, it lessens the impact of the risk.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Work Clothes/Personal Protective Equipment
 It is important to choose PPE that fits you
properly: size, weight, shape and type for the
job.
 If you have a change in body type that would
potentially cause your PPE to not fit properly,
contact your supervisor immediately.
 PPE should be inspected on a regular basis
and replaced when damaged or worn.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Work Clothes/Personal Protective Equipment
 Fire Resistant Clothing (FRC) must be worn
when the task requires it.
 100% cotton long sleeve and long pants are
recommended when FRC are not in use.
 Hard hats shall be worn when required and
inspected on a regular basis.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Work Clothes/Personal Protective
Equipment
 Safety glasses with side shields shall
be worn when required.
 Gloves shall be worn when required.
 Safety toe footwear shall be worn
when required.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Respirators
 There are two main categories of respirators.
 Air purifying: forces contaminated air
through a filtering element.
 Air supplied: an alternate supply
of fresh air is delivered.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Air Purifying
 Used against particulates such as smoke,
fumes, gases and vapors that are at
atmospheric concentrations less than
immediately dangerous to life and health (IDLH).
Examples include:
 Negative pressure: uses mechanical filters
and chemical media.
 Positive pressure: air purifying respirators.
 Escape only or hoods: air purifying for use
by the general public.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Air Purifying
 ANSI/ISEA 110 provides design guidance for
respirators to ensure your protection and
safety during use.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Air Supplied
 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA)
typically have three main components:
 High pressure tank
 Pressure regulator
 Inhalation connection
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Air Supplied
 Most SCBAs are open-circuit which means a
full- face mask, regulator, air cylinder,
pressure gauge, and a harness with shoulder
straps.
 Commonly SCBAs are “positive pressure”
but some are “demand” type which only
supply air when you inhale.
 Employees must be fit tested and medically
qualified BEFORE using a respirator of any
kind.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Banned Items
 The following is a list of banned items that
shall not be in possession of an employee at
any time during working hours or on work
locations. All employees should refer to your
company policy.
 Weapons: firearms, ammunitions, bows
and arrows, and knives.
 Illegal drugs
 Alcohol
 Explosives
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
New Personnel/Short Service Guidelines
 A short service employee is new to the
company and/or position they are working in.
 New employees are often identified by color
coded hard hats and/or being assigned to a
mentor.
 The mentoring process allows proper skills
and processes to be conveyed.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
New Personnel/Short Service Guidelines
 Generals rules include:
 No fighting or horseplay.
 Avoid working alone.
 Report hazards or at-risk conditions to
supervisor.
 Smoke only in designated areas.
 Machine guards and protective coverings
must be in place while operating equipment.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
New Personnel/Short Service Guidelines
 Rings, jewelry, loose hair and loose
clothing are prohibited.
 Do not ride on forklifts or use forklifts as
man lifts.
 All crew changes require
communications between crews.
 Never work on or service moving
equipment.
 Use the proper tool for each job task.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Reporting for Work
 Being under the influence of drugs or alcohol
poses unnecessary and unacceptable safety
and health risks to you and co-workers.
 Watch alcohol consumption the day before
reporting to work.
 Companies reserve the right to test for drug
and alcohol misuse to ensure you are fit for
duty.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Thermal Stress
 Employees need to look for signs and
symptoms of both heat and cold stress.
 Heat Stress
 Heat Exhaustion
 Hypothermia
 Frostbite
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Heat Stress
 Symptoms of heat stress can include:
 Heavy sweating
 Nausea
 Headache
 Fatigue
 Vomiting
 Fast pulse
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Heat Stress
 Treatment of heat stress:
 Move the victim to a cooler area and cool
with wet towels.
 Give cool fluids only if conscious.
 Follow up with a medical examination.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Heat Exhaustion
 Symptoms of heat exhaustion can include:
 High temperature
 Dry skin
 Rapid breathing
 Nausea/vomiting
 Confusion
 Seizures
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Heat Exhaustion
 Treatment of heat exhaustion:
 Move the victim to a cooler area and cool
with wet towels.
 Give cool fluids only if conscious.
 Follow up with a medical examination.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Hypothermia
 The entire body cools because its ability to
keep warm starts to fail.
 Symptoms of hypothermia can include:
 Shivering
 Numbness
 Glassy stare
 Fatigue
 Loss of judgment
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Hypothermia
 Treatment of hypothermia:
 Move the victim to a warm place and
remove any wet clothing.
 Keep the victim warm and dry.
 Seek medical attention.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Frostbite
 Any part of the body freezes due to exposure
to the cold.
 Symptoms of frostbite can include:
 Lack of feeling in affected area
 Skin appears waxy and cold
 Discolored skin
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Frostbite
 Treatment of frostbite:
 Move the victim to a warm place and use
warm water until normal skin color
returns.
 Never rub the affected area.
 Keep the victim warm and dry.
 Seek medical attention.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Snakes
 It is important to identify the type of snake
you are dealing with. This will aid doctors in
treatment if you are bitten.
 Wash the wound and keep the injured area
still and lower than the heart.
Rattle Snake
Copper Head
Bull Snake
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Insects
 Spiders: there are two main types to be
aware of.
 Black Widow
 Brown Recluse or Fiddleback
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Black Widow
 Call Poison Control if bitten (800-222-1222)
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Black Widow
 Symptoms to watch for:
 Dull, aching, or numbing sensation
appears in 20-40 minutes.
 Muscle pain and cramps near bite within
30-120 minutes.
 Board-like rigidity of the abdomen,
shoulders, and back may develop.
 Pain generally peaks at 2-3 hours.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Brown Recluse (Fiddleback)
 Call Poison Control if bitten (800-222-1222)
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Brown Recluse (Fiddleback)
 Symptoms to watch for:
 Reaction depends on the amount of
venom injected and the person’s
sensitivity to the venom.
 Bite may feel like a pinprick or go
unnoticed.
 Symptoms can take 2-8 hours to occur.
 Typically small white blister surrounded by
raised, reddened skin.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Bee/Wasp
 Ensure the stinger has been removed if you
are stung.
 Wash area with soap and water.
 Apply ice pack or cold compress.
 Do not place directly on skin.
 Elevate extremity.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Bee/Wasp
 Watch for signs and symptoms other than at
location of sting for at least 30 minutes.
 Watch for signs of infection to show up later.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Mosquitoes
 Wash bite area thoroughly with warm water
and soap.
 Mosquitoes can transmit serious diseases
such as:
 West Nile
 Malaria
 Yellow Fever
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Mosquitoes
 Signs and symptoms of more serious
infection may include:
 Fever
 Rash
 Severe headache
 Lethargy
 Body aches
 Confusion
 Nausea/vomiting
 Sensitivity to light
 Swollen glands
 Jaundice
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Mosquitoes
 Mosquitoes select their victims by evaluating
scent, exhaled carbon dioxide and the
chemicals in your sweat.
 Mosquitoes are more likely to bite:
 Men
 Those with type “O” blood
 Overweight individuals
 Those wearing dark colors
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Rabid Animals
 Rabies virus travels to the brain by following
the peripheral nerves.
 Incubation period of the disease is usually a
few months.
 Once rabies reaches the central nervous
system and symptoms begin to show, the
infection is effectively untreatable and
usually fatal within days.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Rabid Animals
 Symptoms:
 Flu-like symptoms within 2-12 weeks of
infection.
 Malaise, headache and fever, progressing to
acute pain, violent movements, uncontrolled
excitement, depression and hydrophobia.
 Patient may experience mania and lethargy
that leads to coma.
 Death is usually by respiratory insufficiency.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Lightning
 Seek shelter avoiding
trees and metal objects
that can attract lightning.
 Avoid open areas.
 If you are outside, crouch
down and put your weight
on the balls of your feet.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Windstorm
 Avoid climbing or working
in the derrick.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Hurricane/Tornado
 Be advised on the weather
conditions.
 Keep in close contact with
your supervisor or
dispatch.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 UV Exposure
 Use sunscreen.
 Wear a hard hat with a full
brim.
 Use UV-absorbent
sunglasses.
 Limit your exposure.
 Wear light weight, long
sleeved clothing.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Snow and Ice
 Use ice melting materials
when needed.
 Slow down in bad weather
conditions.
 Wear proper footwear to
help prevent slipping.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Snow and Ice
 Clear your vehicle of any
snow and ice.
 Lights must be visible.
 Top of your vehicle
must be clear.
 Steps and ladders.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Adverse Weather
 Flooding
 Never enter a
roadway that is
covered by water.
 Find an alternate
route or wait for the
water to subside.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Simultaneous Operations
 When simultaneous operations are going
on, you must be aware of all the hazards
that could potentially affect your safety and
the safety of others.
 Communicate any necessary information
with others on location.
 Examples of simultaneous operations
would be drilling and wire line or drilling
and cementing being done at the same
time.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 There were nearly 6,420,000 auto accidents
in the U.S. in 2005.
 The financial cost of these crashes is more
than 230 billion dollars.
 2.9 million people were injured and 42,636
people killed.
 Approximately 115 people die every day in
vehicle crashes in the U.S. – 1 death every
13 minutes.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 When taking the responsibility of driving, it
is important that you are knowledgeable
about factors that can affect you and others
on the roadway.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 Valid Driver License:
 You must be licensed for the type of
equipment you are asked to operate.
 A commercial license is required when
operating DOT regulated vehicles.
 No employee shall operate a Commercial
Motor Vehicle (CMV) without proper
endorsements.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 Journey Management:
 A system to manage the risks associated
with driving conditions and to ensure a
rescue plan is in place.
 Journey management includes route
planning, reviewing weather and road
conditions, equipment operating
conditions and communication.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 Road Conditions:
 Talk with your supervisor or dispatcher
regarding road conditions in the area to
ensure the best route.
 Each state has a phone number to check
road conditions before starting a trip.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
• Cell Phone Usage:
• Texting while in a CMV is prohibited by
law.
• Be familiar with company guidelines in
regards to talking on the phone or radio
while driving.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 Adverse Weather:
 Always slow down and allow extra room
between vehicles.
 Drive defensively at all times.
 Allow extra time for your trip.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Driving
 Seat Belt Usage:
 Seatbelts shall be utilized
in all company vehicles.
 Driving under the influence:
 No employee shall report
to work while under the
influence of drugs and/or
alcohol.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Vehicles Condition/Inspections
 The vehicle is the responsibility of the
operator even when it is parked.
 A walk-around inspection is required before
each trip to ensure the vehicle is in good
mechanical condition.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Vehicles Condition/Inspections
 In addition to required state inspections, all
company vehicles should be thoroughly
inspected by a qualified person annually.
 No vehicle should be driven with obvious
mechanical problems affecting the safety of
the vehicle.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Backing/Parking/Location Hazards
 When possible, park where your first move
will be forward.
 Avoid backing when possible.
 Walk around your vehicle before backing to
ensure enough clearance.
 Use a ground guide when possible.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Loading Securement
 All cargo securement devices must be in
good working order, free of defects.
 Each tie down must be attached and
secured to prevent it from becoming loose,
unfastened, or releasing during transit.
 Commodity-specific requirements take
precedence over the general rules.
Onshore Orientation & Emergency Evacuation
Off-Loading Liquid Cargo
 Be aware of potential hazards on location
before beginning the process.
 Bond your vehicle to the source container to
reduce risk of sparking.
 Ground your vehicle to “bleed off”
electrostatic charges.
 Position your vehicle on level ground, at the
required distance, upwind or crosswind of
the source or receiving tank/vessel.
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