Introduction

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HISTORY OF MAMMOGRAPHY
First proposed in 1924
Article published in 1930
1960’s Robert Egan considered the
“Father of Mammography”
Also 1960’s Charles Gros developed
1st dedicated Mammo unit (Dose 8-12
rads)
1971 Xeroradiography (Dose 2-4rads)
IMPORTANT FACTS ABOUT
MAMMOGRAPHY
Mammography is the most sensitive
and accurate screening modality
available for detecting early breast
cancer.
It is not always diagnostically specific.
It complements but cannot replace
regular physical exams and BSE.
STATISTICS: Breast Cancer
Most common cancer
among women
Second leading cause
of cancer deaths
ACS projects 212,920
new cases for women
in 2006
Of these, 40,970
expected to die.
STATISTICS
One of eight women in the U.S. will
develop breast cancer.
Approximately 50% of cancers
detected at a screening are
impalpable
9% of breast cancers are not detected
by Mammography.
WHAT ABOUT MEN?
An estimated 1720 cases expected in
men for 2006.
Approximately 460 men will die.
FREQUENCY
Age 35 for baseline
National Institutes of Health (NIH)
states screening ages 40-49 every 12 years; every year over 50
ACS recommends every year after
age 40
Patients with strong family histories
should start 10 years prior to age of
family member with cancer.
LUMP SIZE
Average size lump found by
occasional BSE is 2.5cm (1”)
Ave lump found by Mammography is
.5 cm (1/4”)(5yr survival 95%)
On average, lesions detected by
mammography are 8 years old.
By 2 cm nodes are involved in 5060% of the cases.
5 year survival rate is 60%
RISK FACTORS
MAJOR RISK FACTORS
Gender, Age
Personal History of Breast or other CA
Family History
MINOR RISK FACTORS
Hormonal Factors
Child-bearing
Body Shape/Type
Breast Structure
Ethinic Origin
DOSE
1969
1971
Patient dose 8-12 rads
Xeroradiography introduced
Dose 2-4 rads
1986 ACR recommends <300mrad
per single view with grid
1994 4 view =.15 rads or 150mrads
Dental
= 400 mrad
CA Therapy =500 rads
COMPARISON OF DOSE TO
DAILY LIFE
The risk of death from
developing breast
cancer due to
radiation received
from a single
mammographic
examination is equal
to the risk of:
Traveling 80 miles by air
Traveling 10 miles by
car
Smoking 1/8 of one
cigarette
11/2 minutes of
mountain climbing
3 minutes of being a
man age 60
Eating 40 TBSP peanut
butter
EXPERIENCE
INITIAL
Certification or 40 hours of
Mammography training.
25 supervised exams
CONTINUING
15 CE every triennium
100 exams every year
REWARD
Relaxed environment
One on one patient contact
Saving lives
No call or weekends
Collapsed Envelope
11.5 Palpable Giant Fibroadenoma
LYMPHOMA
ARCHITECTURAL DISTORTION
LATE STAGE PALPABLE CA
INSPISSATED DEBRIS AND
DUCT ECTASIA
POST SURGICAL
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