Chap 9 Presenting Your Best Work

advertisement
Chapter 9
Presenting Your
Best Work
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Purpose of This Chapter
To help you acquire and strengthen
presentation skills in writing and in
speeches.
 Is there anyone out there that has a
fear or concern about writing or giving
speeches?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Our College’s Goal is:
. . . to help you develop and improve your
presentation skills in a variety of classes
so that when you graduate, you’ll feel
ready to use these skills on the job.
 Our goal for this class is to get you off to
a good start with some tips and painless
strategies.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Learning Outcomes
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Use the basic steps to effective writing.
Recognize and understand the steps for
writing a research paper.
Recognize and understand the
fundamentals for producing quality
memos, letters, and reports for work.
Overcome the fear of public speaking.
Make interesting, well-organized oral
presentations.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
“The faster I write
the better my output.
If I’m going slow I’m in trouble.
It means I’m pushing the words
instead of being pulled by them.”
—Raymond Chandler
 Reflect on this.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Basic Steps to Effective Writing
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Choosing a Topic for a Writing Assignment
Prewriting
Organizing
Writing a Rough Draft
Revising to Produce Your Final Copy
 Now let’s experience it!
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
—time for another quote—
“The act of writing is the act
of discovering what
you believe.”
—David Hare
 Reflect on this.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Step 1. Let’s Find a Topic
to Write About
Class Share  What topic ideas come to mind
related to each of the following?
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
A hobby or activity you really enjoy
An issue of great concern to you
How to go “green” and save money
The importance of the golden rule
What other ideas are on your mind?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Let’s determine the top 3–5 topics
from the preceding activity.
. . . and divide into groups
according to your preferred topic.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Step 2. Prewriting—What is it?
The text mentioned the following
prewriting strategies:
1.
2.
3.
4.
Brainstorming  Let’s try this one
Freewriting
Questioning
Branching
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
We now have several groups
divided by topic.
1.
Each person should now engage in
independent brainstorming on the topic.
 So how do we brainstorm?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Brainstorm
1.
2.
3.
4.
For 2 minutes, let’s brainstorm independently
(on paper) the details you could include in your
paper.
Share your ideas with your group and develop
one list of possible details for your paper.
Now independently try experimenting with
branching your list.
Now share your branching with the group.
(See Figure 9-1 in your book for an example)
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Step 3. Organizing
1.
Independently  Use your prewriting list
and cross off items you don’t want to
include in your paper.
2.
Put an ! by ideas that are great.
Create an outline to create a logical
sequence.
3.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
An outline:
1.
2.
lists the major points of your paper
in the order they appear.
lists a few notes about what you’ll
say about each point.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Your outline should also include
. . . the 3 main parts of a paper:
Introduction
2. Body
3. Conclusion
1.
What is involved in each of the above?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
On assignment  due ____
1.
2.

Prepare an outline for your essay
Write a rough draft  Step 4
What tips do you have for writing the
rough draft?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Step 5. Revising
 Still on assignment . . .
3.
Revise your rough draft and turn in your paper
 _____

What tips do you have for revising your draft
and preparing your final copy draft?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Research Papers—Oh no!~
 Research
Papers are also easier to write
when you have a step-by-step process.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
ps
Research Paper Ste
Group Teach Aloud  break into 6 groups. Each
group will collaborate to briefly present important
details about one of the following research paper
steps:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Know the ropes
Choose a topic
Gather information
Construct an outline
Write a rough draft
Revise and polish
 Include one piece of humor in your presentation.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Think about your future job.
 How much and what type of writing do
you anticipate?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
The basics for producing quality
memos, letters, and reports for work.
1.
2.
Writing concisely is one of the most
important work writing skills.
How would you define it?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
6 Tips for Writing Concisely
1.
2.
3.
4.
Stay on the message (be focused)
Say it clearly and only once
Use plain language
Keep it simple
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Writing Concisely
5.
continued
Show it  if you have a picture or
diagram.
“A picture is worth a 1,000 words.”
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Read the following description
from Wikipedia
“The English Mastiff, often called simply Mastiff, is
a large breed of dog descended from the ancient
Alaunt through the extinct Pugnaces Britanniae.
A typical male can weigh 150–250 pounds and a
typical female can weigh 120–200 pounds.”
 next slide will “show it with a picture”
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Which one is the English Mastiff?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Writing Concisely
.
6.
Write in the active voice.
 What does this mean?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
continued
Active Voice  emphasizes the
doer & it’s shorter.
1.
This active voice sentence below is 6 words:
Jen delivered the cake to Patrick.
2.
Writing the same sentence in the passive voice
(as below) uses 8 words:
The cake was delivered to Patrick by Jen.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
TRY The Paramedic Method:
A Lesson in Writing Concisely
—from the Owl at Purdue University
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/635/01/
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
Circle the prepositions (of, in, about, for, onto,
into)
Draw a box around the “is” verb forms
Ask, “Where’s the action?”
Change the “action” into a simple verb
Move the doer into the subject (Who’s kicking
whom?)
Eliminate any unnecessary slow wind-ups
Eliminate any redundancies
Example 
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
The Paramedic Method:
A Lesson in Writing Concisely
—from the Owl at Purdue University
http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/635/01/
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Little Wordy?
 Let’s write it more concisely.
It is most likely a true fact that in spite of the fact
that the educational atmosphere that surrounds
our colleges is a very significant and a very
important factor to each and every one of our
citizens in terms of their personal and individual
future development and growth, various different
groups and people do not at all support certain tax
assessments or tax increases at a reasonable and
fair rate that are required for the one and only
purpose and express intention of providing an
excellent educational context at a decent level of
quality.
 next slide
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Concise
 Although
a quality college is important for
our community, some people vote against
tax increases for college improvements.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Beat Procrastination
1.
How does using a step-by-step writing
process help you beat procrastination?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Writing for Business
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
—Writing for Business—
Tell me everything you know about writing
an effective:
1. Memo
2. Business letter
 How does this resemble writing an essay?
3. Report
 How does this resemble writing an essay
and a memo?
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
The Memo is the
most common work Document
Memo Writing Tips







Get to the point quickly—your reader already
knows the subject—it’s on the subject line.
Be interesting, conversational, and natural.
Highlight or underline key ideas .
Use bullets or numbers for quick reading.
Keep each sentence short and simple.
Be specific, clear, and concise.
Keep your reader(s) in mind.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Writing a Business Letter
1.
Use the following 3 parts in a business letter

Introduction

Body

Conclusion
2.
Use of transitions to help your letter flow

“Additionally” or “furthermore”

Or a phrase  “Now that we’ve examined
the possibilities, let's select the route that's
best for you.”
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Writing Reports
1.
2.
3.
4.
Structure it with an introduction, body,
and conclusion.
Be clear, specific, and concise.
Use language appropriate to the reader
and keep it simple.
Use bulleted or numbered lists to
highlight key ideas you want to bring to
your reader’s attention.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Improve Your Writing
with
Journaling
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Keeping a Journal
may seem like a lot of work, but consider:
Choosing a positive Journal Theme
 Writing your:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
Goals
Clever ideas
Good thoughts
Positive self-talk for the day
Good things that happened to anyone
Other????
Journaling gives you practice in writing.

Reflect on this.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Oral Presentations
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Preparing for Your Presentation Will
Give You More Confidence
1.
Use positive self-talk to direct your preparation,
practice, and delivery
2.
Create an outline to keep you organized
3.
Try the essay outline

Introduction

Body

Conclusion
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Preparing for Your Presentation Will
Give You More Confidence continued
4.
Use your outline for practice
5.
If allowed, use a minimal outline for your
speech
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Preparing for Your Presentation Will
Give You More Confidence continued
Use visualization and see yourself:
6.


Energized
Excited about your topic
Use visualization and see your audience:
7.




As attentive and interested
Laughing at your jokes
Responding to your questions
Applauding when you’re finished
Practice and enjoy your practice
8.


Practice grabbing your audience’s attention
Practice each part of your outline with enthusiasm
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
28 Tips for Making Oral
Presentations
Introduce yourself.
Try to be yourself and be relaxed.
Add energy and enthusiasm.
Learn about your audience—chat a little.
Capture the audience’s interest.
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.


Tell them your purpose.
Tell them what you planned to do—build their
anticipation.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Making Oral Presentations
continued
Make eye contact with the audience.
7. Use your whole body (e.g., walk toward the
audience as you speak).
8. Use your natural gestures.
9. Avoid distracting dress and mannerisms.
10. Use the pitch and volume of your voice
effectively.
11. Speak at a pace that is appropriate for my
audience and the material.
12. Deliver material in a clear, energetic way.
6.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Making Oral Presentations
continued
13.
14.
15.
16.
17.
18.
Use pauses.
Use humor.
Show the audience something rather
than just telling them about it .
Use audiovisuals effectively.
Ask questions and give audience a
chance to respond.
Encourage participation in other ways—
try getting them to brainstorm.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Making Oral Presentations
continued
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
Bring the topic to life (e.g., through role
playing or conducting a survey).
Respond to the audience’s nonverbal
messages (e.g. puzzlement, fatigue).
Vary.
Monitor your time.
Avoid introducing new points in the last
few minutes of the session.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Tips for Making Oral Presentations
continued
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
Summarize.
Determine if there are any lingering
questions or concerns.
End the session with good energy.
Invite feedback, either at the end of the
session or sometime following the session.
Use active listening to demonstrate
understanding of the audience’s comments.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
When I wear
my lucky hat
my
presentations
are dynamic!
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Key Chapter Points
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Practice with writing assignments and oral
presentations and you will build your
confidence to use these skills on the job.
Create outlines for writing assignments and
speeches and you will get high marks for
organization.
Keeping a journal is a great way to improve
your writing skills because you put thoughts on
paper.
Strong writing and oral presentation skills are
important for both college and career success.
Make your presentations lively, fun, and
informative, and you will enjoy it.
Copyright © 2010 by Tapestry Press, Ltd.
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards