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Emergency Preparedness
and Response:
The Big Picture
1
The National Response Framework
Core
Document
Doctrine, organization, roles and
responsibilities, response actions
and planning requirements that
guide national response
Emergency Support
Function Annexes
Mechanisms to group and provide Federal
resources and capabilities to support State
and local responders
Support
Annexes
Essential supporting aspects of the Federal
response common to all incidents
Incident
Annexes
Incident-specific applications of the
Framework
Partner
Guides
Next level of detail in response actions
tailored to the actionable entity
www.fema.gov/nrf
2
Applying the Framework
 Most incidents managed entirely locally:
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Some require additional support
Small number require Federal support
Catastrophic requires significant Federal support
State Governor must request Federal support
 Minor event might just be start of larger threat:
 Could rapidly grow larger
 Need to accelerate assessment and response
 Federal Department/Agency acting on own authority may be initial
Federal responder
 Integrated, systematic Federal response intended to occur
seamlessly
3
Effective, unified national response requires
layered, mutually-supporting capabilities
 Local officials have primary responsibility for
community preparedness and response and are
responsible for ensuring the public safety and
welfare of their jurisdiction.
 The local emergency manager
has the day-to-day authority and
responsibility for overseeing
emergency management
programs and activities.
State & Tribal
Governments
Local
Governments
NRF
Federal
Government
Private
Sector
& NGO
4
Effective, unified national response requires
layered, mutually-supporting capabilities
 States are sovereign entities. The Governor is responsible
for public safety and welfare. States are the main players in
coordinating resources and capabilities and obtaining
support from other States and the Federal government.
 A primary role of State government is to
supplement and facilitate local efforts
before, during, and after incidents.
Governors, State homeland security
advisors, State emergency management
directors, and tribal leaders have key roles
and responsibilities in incident
management.
State & Tribal
Governments
Local
Governments
NRF
Federal
Government
Private
Sector
& NGO
5
Effective, unified national response requires
layered, mutually-supporting capabilities
 The Private Sector supports community response,
organizes business to ensure resiliency, and
protects and restores critical infrastructure and
commercial activity.
• Government works with private
sector groups as partners in
emergency management. Major
portions of the nation’s critical
infrastructure are operated and
maintained by the private sector.
State & Tribal
Governments
Local
Governments
NRF
Federal
Government
Private
Sector
& NGO
6
Effective, unified national response requires
layered, mutually-supporting capabilities
NGOs (non-governmental organizations):
Assist individuals who have special needs
Coordinate volunteers
Interface with government response officials at all levels
Perform other vital missions
For example, NGOs provide
sheltering, emergency food supplies,
counseling, and other vital services
to support response and promote the
recovery of disaster victims.
State & Tribal
Governments
Local
Governments
NRF
Federal
Government
Private
Sector
& NGO
7
Effective, unified national response requires
layered, mutually-supporting capabilities
 Individuals and Households are key starting
points for emergency preparedness and support
community efforts.
Though not formally part of emergency
operations, they play a key role in the
overall emergency management
strategy. They can contribute by reducing
hazards in and around their homes,
preparing emergency supply kits and
household emergency plans, and carefully
monitoring emergency communications.
State & Tribal
Governments
Local
Governments
NRF
Federal
Government
Private
Sector
& NGO
8
Emergency Support Functions / Annexes
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ESF #1 - Transportation
ESF #2 - Communications
ESF #3 - Public Works and Engineering
ESF #4 - Firefighting
ESF #5 - Emergency Management
ESF #6 - Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Housing and Human Services
ESF #7 - Logistics Management and Resource Support
ESF #8 - Public Health and Medical Services
ESF #9 - Search and Rescue
ESF #10 - Oil and Hazardous Materials Response
ESF #11 - Agriculture and Natural Resources
ESF #12 - Energy
ESF #13 - Public Safety and Security
ESF #14 - Long-Term Community Recovery
ESF #15 - External Affairs
9
Emergency Support Functions / Annexes
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ESF #1 - Transportation
ESF #2 - Communications
ESF #3 - Public Works and Engineering
ESF #4 - Firefighting
ESF #5 - Emergency Management
ESF #6 - Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Housing and Human Services
ESF #7 - Logistics Management and Resource Support
ESF #8 - Public Health and Medical Services
ESF #9 - Search and Rescue
ESF #10 - Oil and Hazardous Materials Response
ESF #11 - Agriculture and Natural Resources
ESF #12 - Energy
ESF #13 - Public Safety and Security
ESF #14 - Long-Term Community Recovery
ESF #15 - External Affairs
10
ESF #6 in Gwinnett County
 The Department of Human Resources (DHR) Division of
Family and Children Services (DFCS) has primary government
agency responsibility. The American Red Cross (ARC) has
primary volunteer organization responsibility. Supporting roles:
 East Metro Health District (EMHD) - Personnel,
environmental inspections
 Georgia Baptist Convention - Child care, food,
personnel
 The Salvation Army - Donated goods, food
 Local Law Enforcement - Security
 Local Departments of Education and others - Facilities
11
Note roles of entities
 State: Dept. of Human Resources (DHR) Div. of Family
and Children Services (DFCS)
 NGO: American Red Cross (ARC), Georgia Baptist
Convention, The Salvation Army
 State and Local Gov: East Metro Health District (EMHD)
 Local Gov: Law Enforcement, Department of Education
 Private Sector: Businesses assisting in other ways
Re NGOs: American Red Cross, GA Baptist Convention, Salvation
Army, American Radio Relay League, many others are members of
National and/or Georgia Voluntary Organizations Active in
Disaster (VOAD).
12
Emergency Support Functions / Annexes
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•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
ESF #1 - Transportation
ESF #2 - Communications
ESF #3 - Public Works and Engineering
ESF #4 - Firefighting
ESF #5 - Emergency Management
ESF #6 - Mass Care, Emergency Assistance, Housing and Human Services
ESF #7 - Logistics Management and Resource Support
ESF #8 - Public Health and Medical Services
ESF #9 - Search and Rescue
ESF #10 - Oil and Hazardous Materials Response
ESF #11 - Agriculture and Natural Resources
ESF #12 - Energy
ESF #13 - Public Safety and Security
ESF #14 - Long-Term Community Recovery
ESF #15 - External Affairs
13
ESF #8 in Gwinnett County
Under ESF #8, Public Health:
 Coordinates and/or delivers medical, environmental
health, and mental health services
 Accesses and/or seeks health-related private resources
 Supplements disrupted or overburdened health service
delivery personnel and resources
 Coordinates rehabilitation support
14
Support Annexes
• Critical Infrastructure and
Key Resources
• Financial Management
• International Coordination
• Private Sector Coordination
• Public Affairs
• Tribal Relations
• Volunteer and Donations
Management
• Worker Safety and Health
Incident Annexes
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Biological Incident
Catastrophic Incident
Cyber Incident
Food and Agriculture Incident
Mass Evacuation Incident
Nuclear/Radiological Incident
Terrorism Incident Law
Enforcement and Investigation
15
Support Annex A14 Volunteer Programs Management
 Addresses how the Medical Reserve Corps
program integrates with emergency response
 Describes where volunteers might be used in a
healthcare emergency
 Provides forms that must be completed to
address liability issues
 Provides job action sheets that can be used for
just-in-time training
Support Annex A15 Modular Emergency Medical System
 Addresses medical surge options in support of hospitals
 Defines Neighborhood Emergency Help Center
 Defines Acute Care Center
 Defines staffing requirements based on given
configuration
 Does not address specific alternative standards of care
protocols
Support Annex A16 Strategic National Stockpile
 Criteria for and how to request the SNS
 Mass dispensing/vaccination procedures
 Manpower requirements
 Just-in-time training materials for using
volunteers
 Medication control procedures
 Patient education
What is the Strategic National Stockpile ?
A large CDC-managed stockpile of medicine and
medical supplies to protect the American public if
there is a public health emergency severe enough
to cause local supplies to run out.
You can learn more about the
Strategic National Stockpile at
http://www.bt.cdc.gov/stockpile
Strategic National Stockpile Components
 Push Pack/12 Hours
 Vendor Managed Inventory/ 24-36 hours
SNS Responsibilities
 SNS
 Send medications / vaccines
 Provide technical assistance
 State and Local governments
 Demonstrate need for supplies
 Receive, stage and store supplies
 Dispense at community PODs
 Hospitals
 Dispense to at hospital PODs
What is a POD?
Point of dispensing (POD) - a place where a vaccine,
antibiotic or other medication is dispensed quickly to a large
group of people.
 First Responders
 Hospital staff & patients
 Community members
Why would a POD be activated?
 Usually: To prevent disease in those exposed to an
infection but who are not yet sick
 Possibly: To treat an infectious disease
 The treatment offered would be limited to
dispensing a specific medication.
What Kinds of Emergencies Might
Require a POD?
 Natural disaster
 Influenza pandemic
 Bioterrorism attack
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