PowerPoint - Fayette County Issues Tea Party

Fayette County Issues Tea Party
MonthlyMeeting
Feb 4, 2014
Finding Our Way
In Regional
Government
Fayette County
Steve Brown
Board of Commissioners
Sex and Age
Fayette County
Sex and Age
Mature: ages 35-69
Fayette County
Sex and Age
Atlanta Region
20 Counties
Race and
Hispanic Origin
Fayette County
Race and
Hispanic Origin
Atlanta Region
20 Counties
-------------------50% Minority
Married
Households
Single
Households
Fayette County
-------------------Married Parent
66%
Fayette County
-------------------Single Parent
14%
2010 Census
Married
Households
Single
Households
Atlanta Region
20 Counties
-------------------Married Parent
49%
Atlanta Region
20 Counties
-------------------Single Parent
20%
2010 Census
Close in size by
land mass:
DeKalb
Population: 691,893
(2553 people per square mile)
Fayette
Population: 106,567
(535 people per square mile)
2010 Census
Counties With Highest Percentage of Population
Living in Cities
1. Fulton County
90.3%
Counties With Highest Percentage of Population
Living in Cities
1.
2.
3.
4.
…
7.
8.
Fulton County
Fayette County
Henry County
Douglas County
Cobb County
Gwinnett County
90.3%
53.8%
29.3%
28.1%
26.0%
24.5%
According to the
Federal
Government, our
“Metropolitan
Statistical Area”
is made of 28
counties.
The Atlanta Regional
Commission (ARC) is the
regional planning and
intergovernmental
coordination agency for
the 10-county Atlanta
area, including Cherokee,
Clayton, Cobb, DeKalb,
Douglas, Fayette, Fulton,
Gwinnett, Henry and
Rockdale counties
(20 counties for air quality issues)
Development Materialized
Urban Core Counties
COBB
GWINNETT
FULTON
DEKALB
CLAYTON
Emerging Growth
10-County Atlanta Regional Commission
CHEROKEE
COBB
GWINNETT
FULTON
DOUGLAS
ROCKDALE
DEKALB
FAYETTE
HENRY
CLAYTON
Big $$$ Problems
 There is no funding to maintain the dysfunctional
growth of the Core Urban Counties.
 There is no funding to make the needed road
improvements for the Emerging Growth Counties.
 Mass transit has low ridership and is not cost
efficient.
The First Look at Regional Taxation and Governance
Transportation Investment Act (a.k.a. “TSPLOST”)
63% Opposed
(A horrible project list – little attention to traffic congestion)
TSPLOST: A Moving Target
First: “Untie the traffic knot” (relieve traffic congestion)
Next: “Save the development industry”
Last ditch appeal: “It’s about creating jobs”
HB 195
A Flexible Solution
(Heading in the right direction)
Rep. Ed Setzler
Reminder: There is nothing wrong with regional
cooperation.
Fayette has been a key collaborative partner in
the region.
“A man’s got to
know his
limitations.”
- Clint Eastwood as Inspector Harry Callahan,
Magnum Force (1973)
Where do we draw the line on regionalism?
The Pitfalls of Regional Governance and Taxation
 Serious lack of accountability to the citizen taxpayers
 Disparity among various counties
Gwinnett vs. Fayette
 Parochial interests create a conflicting regional vision
Atlanta Beltline and light rail trains
 Influence of outside special development interests
 Lack of a decent regional planning mechanism
Atlanta Regional Commission
16 of the 39 Board Members are NOT elected by the citizens
of any jurisdiction.
The past and current ARC Chairmen are non-elected officials
in real estate development who are with Community
Improvement Districts, competing for transportation dollars
within the region.
Georgia Regional Transportation Authority
GRTA
All 15 Members on the Board of Directors are appointed by
the Governor.
Only 3 are elected officials and nearly all the others are
related to the real estate development industry.
“With the [Federal] Highway Trust Fund forecast to go
bankrupt next year [2015] and the current two-year
transportation bill set to expire Oct. 1, Congress faces a
struggle to find funds for a new long-term
transportation bill.”
- Congress to face dilemma in funding long-term transportation bill, 1/15/2014 - Washington Post
Congress is stealing funds from the general fund to
prop-up the Highway Trust Fund.
We need to stop funding transit from the [Federal]
Highway Trust Fund.
Motor fuel taxes pay for the fund and it should be
used to pay for improvements to roads and bridges.
Transit is a huge financial black hole and will never
come close to paying for itself. Yet regional leaders
urge the continued construction of expensive transit
projects, further eroding the Fed Trust Fund.
“ [Metro Atlanta should] spend 50% of
our transportation funds on transit rail.”
- Christopher Leinberger, Atlanta Regional Commission’s State of the Region Breakfast, November 1, 2013 (Created the
Atlanta Walk-UP study)
Road maintenance?
Instead of giving State Powerbrokers, Appointed
Officials and Real Estate Developers the keys to
our local governments, it might be better to
change the locks.
Paraphrase of a quote from Doug Larson
Accomplishments
 Moved transportation focus to “sub-regional”
 Leveling the playing field between Urban Core and
Emerging counties
 Incorporating opposing points of view
Where to Focus






Create accountability to the citizen taxpayers
Demand protection of “home rule”
Get out of “one-size-fits-all” solutions
Do not allow forced mandatory regional taxation
Develop rational metrics for transit projects
Insist attention be given to Southern Crescent
counties (transportation and economic development)
The New Federal View of Regionalism
“Obamaregionomics”
(Go look at the Board of Directors for Building One America)
https://buildingoneamerica.org
The unraveling of America’s suburbs.
Young Professor Obama
on
Race and Regionalism
The Agenda of Building One America
•
Force new development in cities and prohibit growth in suburbs
and beyond. Build a transit-oriented society.
•
Impose economic integration, income housing quotas, loss of
local control of zoning and land use.
•
Tax sharing to reduce “fiscal disparities” among local
governments. One county paying for another’s needs (Think
Metro Atlanta T-SPLOST).
Myron Orfield
Described as "the most
influential social
demographer in America's
burgeoning regional
movement," wrote Neal
Peirce in his nationally
distributed column in
spring 2002.
Orfield Believes …
“Local approaches to growth and economic development
create competition that ultimately hurts all parts of the
region. Instead, localities should work together to advocate
new regional, state and federal policies such as: greater
fiscal equity to equalize resources among local
governments, smarter growth management to support
more sustainable development practices, and accountable
metropolitan governance to improve regional transportation
and land-use planning.”
http://citistates.com/wp-content/uploads/legacy/assocspeakers/m_orfield.html
Megaregions
Piedmont Atlantic
Megaregion (PAM)
Jacksonville to Nashville, Raleigh to
Birmingham
34 million people
12% of total U.S. population
Gross Regional Product: $1.1 trillion
“Develop a conceptual framework that incorporates the megaregion concept into
existing policy and governance processes.”
http://www.cqgrd.gatech.edu/research/megaregions/piedmont-atlantic-megaregion
Thank You
Steve Brown, Chairman
Fayette County Board of Comm.
(404) 798-0587
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