Building design process - Integrated Environmental Solutions

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IES Faculty BIM Integration with IES
6th September 2011
Dr Sarah Graham
B Eng, C Eng MCIBSE, Eng D
UK Sales Manager
T: +44 141 945 8500
C: +44 7837 251354
[email protected]
www.iesve.com
Overview
0930 – 0940 Welcome and Introduction SG
0940 – 1030 BIM Integration Overview SG
1030 – 1100 The Issues
1100 – 1110 Comfort Break
1110 – 1145 Understanding Complexity
1145 – 1230 Question and Answer
What is BIM?
• BIM (Building Information Modelling)
− A process of generating and managing building data during its life
cycle. It can use three-dimensional, real-time, dynamic building
modelling software to increase productivity in building design,
construction and maintenance period.
− “ A model-based technology linked with a database of project
information” according to American Institute of Architects
What is BIM?
• Multiple models into a “composite model”
Structural
Model
Architectural
Model
• Graphical information
-3D objects visual in the
model
Electrical
Model
Mechanical
Model
Composite
Model
Plumbing
Model
BIM
(linked with phasing,
sequencing,
construction
schedule)
• Non-graphical
information
- Performance data
Energy
Model
Other Model
Compliance
Model
Cost Model
• Linked information
- Schedule & cost
information
BIM process- a collaborative process
Building Owner f
Contractor
Architecture
Civil Engineering
BIM f
Facilities Manager
Mechanical Engineer
Integrated Design Process
Electrical Engineer
Construction
Manager
Conventional design process
Building design process
Master
Planning
Concept
Design
Schematic
Design
Detailed
Design
Completion
In use
Planning staff,
clients
community member
Architect & clients
Mainly architect ,
structural engineer &
clients
Mechanical,
electrical, & civil
engineers
Contractors,
construction manager,
commissioning
authority, cost
estimator
A linear design process
Performance analysis
tool
Users
Conventional design process
Project start
Concept Design
Schematic Design
Tender documentation
Effort
Detailed Design
Consultation
& Engagement
Construction
Schematic
Design
Detailed
Design
Construction
Documents
Time
completion
Construction
Integrated design process
Key elements of integrated design process
Building design process
• Discussion of the various important performance
issues and the establishment of a consensus on this
matter between client and designers
Effort
• Inter-disciplinary collaboration between architects,
engineers, cost consultants and facility managers
from the beginning of the design process
Traditional
• Budget restrictions applied at the whole building
level, with no strict separation of budgets for
individual building systems.
• Involvement of specialists (e.g. energy engineering,
energy simulation, daylighting, comfort)
• Data sharing
• Clear articulation of performance targets and
strategies, to be updated throughout the process by
the design team
• Documentation and transparency of design
decisions
Schematic Detailed
Design
Design
Construction
Documents
Time
Construction
Integrated design process
Predictive/incentive
modelling
Compliance
modelling
Completion
A multi-disciplinary design
team
design
process
A multidisciplinary
design
team
Building
Building
Concept design
Conceptual
modelling
•Landscape architect
•Ecologist
•Architect
•Energy specialist
•Structural engineering
•Civil engineering
•Mechanical engineer
•Electrical engineer
•Plumbing engineer
•Other specialists(fire, acoustics,
daylighting, controls, etc.)
•Facility manager
•Contractor
•Construction manager
•Cost estimator
Building design process
Building design process
Master
Planning
Concept
Design
Schematic
Design
Detailed
Design
Completion
In use
Climate
Brief consequences
Baseline solution
Brief refinement
Certification
Locality
Building type
Baseline outcomes
Detail definitions
Energy in use
Site features
Climate & bldg type
Footprint
Systems
Re-certification
Nat resources
Building form
Scheme directions
HVAC
Controls
Urban form
Footprint headlines
Building solar
Air flows
Re-furbish & improve
Urban solar
Headline design
directions
Building light
Building detail
feature design
Urban light
Visualise
Headline
sustainability
directions
Visualise
Renewable directions
Sustainability
directions
Loads – steady state
Energy – dynamic
Basic loads
Plant size
Compliance
directions
Optimisation
Visualise
Energy compliance
Sustainability
compliance
Certification
CFD etc studies
Visualise
Integrated approach to project delivery
Project location: Glasgow
Master planning
What if climate
change?
2050?
<Virtual Environment> model
of the Scottish Parliament
Building
Integrated approach to project delivery
Concept design
Sketch model
VE model
VE models with different glazing percentage
<Virtual Environment> model
of the Scottish Parliament
Building
Integrated approach to project delivery
Schematic design
VE model
with 20%
glazing
Suncast
Radiance
Apache System
EPC
Thermal result
MacroFlo
Integrated approach to project delivery
Detailed design
Suncast
CFD
Simulex
HVAC
EPC
Radiance
Cost Plan
Model Merge
• Changes to Imported Geometry are Updated in <VE> Model
Without Overwriting Input Data
Original Model
Room Data
New Model
Room Data
What does software does IES work with?
Graphisoft ArchiCAD gbXML
• Autodesk
Revit Architecture 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
• Autodesk Revit MEP 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011
• ArchiCAD via gbXML
•Microstation, Allplan via gbMXL
Other gbXML
•Google Sketchup 6 & 7
• Google Sketchup Pro 6 & 7
The benefits….
…don’t have to rebuild geometry to run analysis
…the potential to change the dialog between architects and engineers
1.
Draw Geometry in Autodesk Revit
2.
From the Revit Toolbar:
•
Set Building Location
•
Define Building Parameters:
•
Building Type
•
Construction Materials
•
Building System Types
•
Room Types
3.
Launch IES VE-Toolkits/VE-Pro
4.
Choose Analysis Type
<VE>
How it works:
gbXML
IES VE: Autodesk Revit Plug-in Updates
gbXML Hierarchy
Adjacencies
Adjacencies
We spoke about the importance
of ‘rooms’. Within Revit, you can
define a wall to be an exterior
wall, but this will mean nothing
when it comes to the gbXML
translation. The only way a wall
is recognized as an exterior vs
an interior wall is by their
adjacencies.
So for an element to be defined
as ground floor slab, it is a
horizontal surface adjacent to a
room (otherwise it is a shading
device) that is not in contact with
any room below. For a floor, it’s
a horizontal surface that is in
contact with a room above and
below. For a roof, it’s a
horizontal surface that is not in
contact with any room above.
Exterior walls are vertical
surface that is not in contact with
an adjacent room on one side
Adjacencies
Keep It Simple
Keep your geometry as simple as possible!
• Is this geometry absolutely necessary for the type of analysis I am
running?
• Can I eliminate anything from my model? (Purge unused, etc)
• There are often thousands of shading surfaces in a Revit file. If you are
doing a daylight analysis, are the 4 cm mullions going to affect the
outcome? They will affect the runtime significantly.
Basic Modelling - Columns
Basic Modelling – Problem Wall Conditions
Basic Modelling – Problem Wall Conditions
Basic Modelling – Shading Elements
Basic Modelling – Openings
IES VE: gbXML “Healing Tools”
<Virtual Environment> Software Suite
Integrated sustainable building design analysis tools
Dr Sarah Graham ([email protected])
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