Wireless Standards Presentation

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ISA 107.4 – Wireless Standards for
Turbine Engine Test Stands
Teja Kuruganti, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Dan Sexton, GE Global Research
Wayne Manges, Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Agenda
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8:00 – 8:30 a.m. Registration and Continental Breakfast
8:30 – 8:45 a.m. Welcome and Introductions
Presidents Room
8:45 – 9:15 a.m. Keynote: Dr. Gary T. Seng,
NASA Glenn Research Center
Focus Area Presentations And Round Table Discussions Presidents Room
9:15 – 10:30 a.m. TOPIC: Wireless Sensors and Data Transmission
10:30 – 10:45 a.m. Break
We are Here!
10:45 – 12:00 p.m. TOPIC: Hot Section Sensors
12:00 – 12:45 p.m. Lunch
Sun Room
12:45 – 1:00 p.m. Break
Focus Area Presentations And Round Table Discussions
1:10 – 2:15 p.m. TOPIC: Smart Sensors
2:15 – 2:30 p.m. Break
2:30 – 3:45 p.m. TOPIC: Hardware in the Loop
3:45 – 4:30 p.m. Next steps and “Go Forward Plan”
4:30 p.m. Adjourn
Presidents Room
Introduction - Facilitators
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Teja Kuruganti
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Dan Sexton
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Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Background: 10 years of experience in wireless sensor networks particularly in harsh environments, communications
modeling, applications of wireless sensors for energy efficiency improvements
Participated in ISA 100 activities
Current interests: Next generation wireless technologies for secure communication networks for electric grid,
cybersecurity of communications in electric grid, control over communication networks, channel modeling in harsh
environments
GE Global Research
Background: 33 years of industry experience in wireless sensors, analog and digital design, system design
Co-chair ISA100.11a – Wireless Industrial Sensor Networks
Current Interests: Multi-industry wireless sensor networks, wireless interface standards that are vendor agnostic and help
to proliferate the use of wireless technologies where they can offer value for reduced installation costs and open up new
applications spaces
Wayne Manges
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Oak Ridge National Laboratory
Background: 34 years of experience in communications, control systems, systems integration, and
standards development
Co-chair ISA100 – Wireless Industrial Sensor Networks
Current Interests: Standards development for introduction of next-generation wireless networks in to
industry (process, manufacturing) and smart grid, trustworthiness of wireless sensors in harsh industrial
applications, interoperability of multi-vendor wireless sensors networks
ISA107.4 Scope
• The Subcommittee’s focus is to define scalable
architectures, system components, and protocols that
allow secure reliable wireless connectivity for test cell
based turbine engine measurements.
• The results of this Subcommittee may serve as a basis
for future on-wing engine health monitoring or control
systems.
• This subcommittee will leverage the efforts of existing
committees (e.g. ISA84, ISA99, ISA100) and contribute
to these committees as necessary.
Scope developed at Subcommittee’s first face-to-face meeting at
Automation Week 2011 , St. Louis
ISA 107.4 Timeline
• SP107.4 Subcommittee meeting at PIWG meeting on
November 9th 2011 in Chatsworth, CA
– Establish goals like future proof, vendor agnostic, make sure we
aren’t excluding approaches (inclusivity).
– Harmonize Subcommittee’s Goals with DO #1 : Identification of
Current and Future Sensor and Instrumentation Technology
– Goals agreed to in tcon’s before 11/9 and requirements. Present
goals and start of requirements
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Define requirements by 1/1/2012
RFI issue 2/15/2012
Intent to respond by 3/1/2012
RFI actual response 4/15/2012
RFI responders make presentations at PIWG spring meeting
– 20 minute presentations, with 10 minute Q/A
Standard vs. Proprietary Solutions
Proprietary
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– Single point of contact
– Customized/targeted
solutions
– Vendor relationship
• Cons
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Scalability
Interoperability
Very limited suppliers
Life-cycle cost
Standard
• Pros
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Multi-vendor solutions
Low-cost
Interoperability
Extensive support
Non-traditional suppliers
Flexible
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– Consensus-based activity
– Intense user participation
required
– Homogenized outcome
What is the Purpose of this Subcommittee
• Where shall the wireless interfaces need to be?
– Define the surrounding environment (inside or outside engine)
– Identify the radio frequency (RF) environment
• Multi-vendor interoperability support for various
applications on the test stand
– System integration support for critical and non-critical
measurements
– Common application interfaces
– Common network management
– Enhanced security management
• Co-existence support
– With other network standards – possible
– Other proprietary networks – not addressable
Goals for this meeting
• Does the wider-community want a standard for wireless
instrumentation in turbine test stand environments?
– PIWG already endorsed the concept
• What should the standard be from this community
perspective?
– What problems should be addressed?
– What are requirements?
– Data delivery requirements to make meaningful observations
– List of sensing modalities
– Where shall the interfaces need to be to perform observations
• Recruit people – primarily industry experts (turbine)
– Step 1 – define and develop the requirements
– Step 2 – understanding what is feasible (technology)
Wireless Scenarios Identified by PIWG in
DO#1
• Non-rotating Wireless Data Concentrator
– Mounted on Cold Section Engine Case
– 150 F – 300 F (66 C – 149 C)
• Non-rotating Wireless Transmission of Compressor Exit Pressure and
Temperature Transmitter
– Mounted on Engine Case at the Plane of the Compressor Exit
– 400 F – 500 F (204 C – 260 C)
• Non-rotating Wireless Data Concentrator
– Mounted on Hot Section Engine Case at the Plane of the HPT
– 500 F – 700 F (260 C – 371 C)
• Non- Rotating Turbine Strain & Temperature Telemetry
– Mounted on Hot Section - Components
– 900 F – 1200 F (482 C – 649 C) (LPT) 1600 F (871 C) (HPT)
• Rotating Turbine Strain & Temperature Telemetry in Hot Section
– 900 F – 1200 F (482 C – 649 C) (LPT) 1600 F (871 C) (HPT)
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