Protecting your professional identity SCC1

advertisement
Protecting Your Professional
Identity
Please note some
slides contain
language of an
inappropriate
nature
L Searle
Senior ICT Adviser
e-Learning and Information Management Service
(ref K Corish SWGFL, B Harding Wiltshire)
Useful links
•
•
•
South West Grid for Learning; exemplar policies etc
– www.swgfl.org.uk/staying-safe
Kent Trust – e safety; Safeguarding
– www.kenttrustweb.org.uk/kcn/e-safety_home.cfm
360 degree safe; school esafety self review tool
– www.360safe.org.uk
•
•
Rights and responsibilities
Staff using technology in school
Issues
e-safety Live ‘09
•
•
Staff using technology socially
Cyberbullying and supporting school staff
What The Papers Say
What The Papers Say
What The Papers Say
What The Papers Say
What The Papers Say
Can I use a school
computer to book
holidays etc
during lunch time
or after school?
Can I respond to a
comment about
the school on
Facebook?
How should I
respond if I am
subjected to
cyber bullying by
pupils?
Can school limit
my private online
publishing?
Can I use my
mobile to take
photos or videos
on school trips?
Can I use Bebo to
discuss a topic
with my
students?
Should I text a
pupil in the
evening to
remind and
encourage him to
complete a
project?
Should I continue
to use my social
network site?
Responsibilities
DCSF Guidance for Safer Working Practice for
Adults Who Work with Children and Young People
Section 12 Communication with Children and Young People (including the Use of Technology)
Communication between
children and adults, by
whatever method, should
take place within clear and
explicit professional
boundaries. This includes
the wider use of
technology such as mobile
phones text messaging, emails, digital cameras,
videos, web-cams,
websites and blogs.
Adults should not share
any personal information
with a child or young
person. They should not
request, or respond to,
any personal information
from the child/young
person, other than that
which might be
appropriate as part of
their professional role.
Adults should ensure
that all communications
are transparent and open
to scrutiny.
Responsibilities
General Teaching Council for England
Code of Conduct
Paragraph 8: Bringing the profession into serious disrepute
Conduct in this category would include behaviour which was
seriously detrimental to the standing of the profession but
where no criminal offence was committed.
“not attempt to establish an inappropriate relationship with
a pupil by means which might include sending e-mails or
text messages to pupils of an inappropriate or personal
nature.”
“exercise extreme caution in connection with contact/web
cam internet sites (for example chat rooms, message boards,
social networking sites and newsgroups) and avoid
inappropriate communication with individuals under 18 or
with whom you may be in a position of trust.”
Physical Safety
Psychological
Safety
Freedom from physical harm
Freedom from cruelty, harassment
and exposure to potentially harmful
material
Reputational and
legal safety
Freedom from unwanted social,
academic, professional and legal
consequences that might affect you
for a lifetime
Identity, property
and community
safety
Freedom from theft of identity and
property and attacks against
networks and online communities at
local, national and international level
Staff use of technology in school
Mobile
Phones
and
Cameras
Staff Laptops
and Online
Technologies
Personal
Data
Clear staff AUP for
mobile phone use
Encourage an open
ethos of reporting or
discussing unsafe
practice
Use school phones or
cameras
Uploading images of
colleagues. Clarify and
discuss
Personal devices
should be avoided
Keep mobile phone
number safe. If you feel
your number has been
compromised then
report it to line manager
Secure your phone when not
in use preferably using the
phone’s security code or pin
Only contact pupils on THEIR
mobiles using a school device
If a child HAS to use your
phone, supervise the call and
delete any numbers
afterwards
Set your phone’s bluetooth
visibility to “hidden” or “off”.
Bluetooth is easily
compromised with the right
software (BlueJacking)
Record your phone’s
International Mobile
Equipment Identity Number
(IMEI) in case it is stolen.
Find this by typing *#06# or
look underneath the battery
Family use could increase the
risk of virus or malware
Staff should not access
inappropriate material on a
school laptop; ie material that
constitutes a risk to children and
themselves professionally
Staff should always ensure
that they have absolute
control of a school laptop
allocated to their use
Other family users need to be
logged on by the person
responsible for the laptop. With
this in mind, think about who
would be culpable in certain
situations
Schools should have clear
guidelines and policy on personal
use of staff laptops. Increasingly
therefore non-professional use is
being banned
The school policy on data
needs to be clear,
understood and respected
Staff are responsible for
unauthorised access to
personal data that they
may use at home
Devices that contain
personal data that leaves
the school premises will
need to be encrypted
Keeping personal data
within the confines of the
school premises mitigates
90% of the risks
Avoid storing personal
data on removable media
like USB sticks, CDs or
portable hard drives
Staff use of technology socially
Reduce
vunerability
Manage visibility
Caution in the
subjects you
discuss
Let your
colleagues know
your expectations
•Learn how to set privacy settings
eg Facebook
•Do you have a legacy?
•Limit social networking search
results
•Google your own name or use
Spezify, 123 people
•Limit SN site Google searches
•Compromise your professional
identity
•Inappropriate site membership
•Discussing pupils, parents or
colleagues on publicly available sites
•Tagging staff outings
•Avoid embarrassing wall posts and let
colleagues know you will not respond
•Email funnies on official email
Ref: Microsoft Data Privacy Day
Online reputation research
Safer Working Practice
Don’t forget data protection ……….
Becta advice
Cyberbullying
Don’t retaliate or engage on a personal level.
Report appropriately and get support
Keep records; texts, screen prints, times and dates
Inform your line manager
Establish if there is enough information and
resource to deal with this in school. If not seek
support from an external agency eg LA, SWGfL.
If there has been a potential criminal offence, then
call the police. They may be able to help with a
RIPA (Regulation of Investigatory Powers act
2000) enabling disclosure of information.
Keep monitoring and confiscation appropriate. In
the esafety policy, make the sanctions are clear
about how and when confiscation and monitoring
will take place.
Take every claim by young people seriously so that
you follow due process in situations where a child
has claimed abuse by a member of staff.
All incidents should involve a designated member
of the SLT who will take responsibility for the
management of the incident.
If needed, obtain additional pastoral and/or legal
support from their Union representative.
Where appropriate, incidents should be reported to
the LADO (Local Authority Designated Officer).
360 degree safe study/SWGfL advice
Facebook Places
E-Safety Live
24 November 2010 - Buckfast Abbey, Devon
25 November 2010 - Avon and Somerset Police HQ, Portishead, Bristol
18 January 2011 - The Cedars, Barnstaple, North Devon
19 January 2011 - Best Western Royal Chase Hotel, Shaftesbury
Make a note of the social networking website address and print off or take a
screen shot of the page(s) as evidence.
Report the incident to a senior manager (e.g. head teacher) and the e-safety coordinator at your school - they should conduct a prompt investigation. It is
recommended that you make the report in writing and copy in your trade union
representative.
If the investigation finds that a student (or a group of students) is involved in the
incident, they should be disciplined in line with the school's disciplinary
procedures in areas such as anti-bullying and acceptable use of ICT equipment.
School guidelines should be followed in terms of informing the student's parents.
If the investigation determines who set up the social networking page in the first
place, the student(s) in question should be asked to remove or amend the content
in question.
If the student(s) refuses to remove or amend the content, the senior manager (or
you) should contact the social networking provider (eg Bebo, Facebook or
MySpace) to ask them to investigate whether the site's terms of service have been
violated and to take the appropriate action. The social networking provider might
be able to delete the content if it is deemed to violate a person's rights or threaten
their safety, for example.
Contact details E Learning and
Information Management Service
[email protected]
Tel: 01823 356839
Secondary/Middle:
Ian Gover
Gavin Richards
Harry Hughes
Primary/Special:
Julia Briggs
Amy Blackmore
Tanya Byron
E-Safety Live ’09
Key Note
•
•
•
School self evaluation report
Safer use of technologies
Safeguarding –
Every Child Matters
School self evaluation
Policies
•
Curricweb exemplar policies
Download