Building Environments for Healthy Communities

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CHANGE:
Using Data Strategically
Jay Daniels, MPH
Healthy Communities Consultant
SC Dept of Health and Environmental Control
2011 Preventive Health and Health Services Block Grant Summit
Presentation created by
Shannon Griffin-Blake, Ph.D.
Ann Ussery-Hall,MPH
Community Health Assessment aNd
Group Evaluation (CHANGE)
• Background – Policy, Systems and Environmental
(PSE) changes
• Community Health Assessment aNd Group Evaluation
(CHANGE)
 Purpose
 Overview
 Methods
•
CHANGE Planning Tool


How to use data
Strategic dialogue
Important
Health
Consequences
in Children
Why Policy, Systems, & Environmental
(PSE) Change Strategies?
• Want to see communitylevel change
• More sustainable
• Make the healthy choice,
the easy choice!
• Considered best practice
by the CDC
Institute of Medicine Quote
“It is unreasonable to expect that
people will change their behavior
easily when so many forces in the
social, cultural, and physical
environment conspire against such
change.”
-Smedly and Syme (2000)
What is PSE?
The policies, systems, and environments around us, including
our communities, worksites, transportation systems, schools,
faith-based organizations, and health care settings shape the
pattern of our lives and our health.
Changing PSE helps make healthy choices easy, safe, and
affordable can improve community health.
Some examples of PSE that can impact diabetes include:
attractive sidewalks, trails, bike lanes, farmers markets, school
gardens, healthy vending options, tobacco-free worksites, etc.
http://www.cdc.gov/CommunitiesPuttingPreventiontoWork/poli
cy/index.htm
Iodination
of salt
Fluoridation of water
CHANGE
CHANGE Tool Purpose(s):
1) Capture current snapshot of the
community
2) Group activity/consensus building
CHANGE: Overview
• Walks communities through assessment process
• Provides a snapshot of policy, systems
and environmental change strategies
(‘assets’ and ‘needs’)
• Frame and understand the current
status of community health
• Allows communities to track progress
across a 5-point scale so incremental
changes can be noted
CHANGE:
Key Benefits
• Allows local stakeholders to work
together in a collaborative process to
survey their community
• Offers suggestions and examples of
policy and environmental change
strategies
• Provides feedback for communities as
they institute change to support
healthy living
Emerging Vision
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
Existing
Initiatives
CHANGE
Tool
Setting Priorities
(Community
Action Plan)
Local
Trends
Community
Assessment
QUOTE: If you are going to climb, you’ve got to grab the
branches, not the blossoms.
-ANON
Who Completes CHANGE?
Coalitions with broad participation from community leaders:
Mayor/
City
Council
Police Chief
School
Principal
Health
Insurer
Corporate
Executive
Chamber of
Commerce
Community
Coalition
Foundation
Executive
Parks &
Rec. Dir.
Media
Director
Hospital
Admin.
Public
Health
Director
CHANGE Tool
5 Sectors:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Community-At-Large: Includes community-wide efforts that
impact the social and built environments; such as food
access, walkability or bikeability, smoking bans, and personal
safety.
School: Includes all primary and secondary learning
institutions (e.g., elementary, middle and high schools,
whether private, public, or parochial).
Worksite: Includes places of employment; such as private
offices, restaurants, retail establishments, or government
offices.
Healthcare: Includes places people go to receive preventive
care or treatment, or emergency health care services; such
as hospitals, private doctors’ offices, or community clinics.
Community Institution/Organization (CIO): Includes entities
within the community that provide a broad range of human
services and access to facilities, such as childcare settings,
faith-based organizations, senior centers, boys and girls
clubs, and colleges/universities.
CHANGE Tool
Modules:
•
•
•
•
•
Demographics,
Physical Activity,
Nutrition,
Tobacco Use,
Chronic Disease Management,
Leadership, &
*Note: School sector only
• After-School*
Other Potential Sources of
Community Info
Methods: Interviews, focus
groups, town halls, informal
dialogue, brainstorming sessions
•
•
•
•
Hear community voices
Build community ownership
Identify key resources
Build feedback loops
Other Potential Sources of
Community Info
Community Audit/Observation
• Windshield tour/survey
• Walkability audit
•
•
Pedestrian safety
Alternative routes
• Environmental checklist
•
•
•
Health messages
Ergonomics/safety
Food security
Resource: http://www.cdc.gov/DHDSP/library/seh_handbook/
Strengths/Resources
Areas for Improvements
Before
After
HCP Website:
http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyCommunitiesProgram
Jay Daniels, MPH
SCDHEC
Healthy Communities Program
[email protected]
803-545-4486
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