Multi-skilling

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ROLL NO.
05
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27
37
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NAME
Daksh Agrawal
Sneha
Navya Jain
Anand Shankar
Priyanka Srivastava
Pooja Rani
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• Introduction
• Types of multiskilling
• Who needs to get multiskilling
• Need for multiskilling
• Techniques of multiskilling
• Advantages of Multiskilling
• Barriers to Multiskilling
• Case Study
• Bibliography
HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT
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• Organisations typically multiskill with the
intent of removing functional barriers and
increasing the flexibility of the workforce; it
is rarely about the ‘ideals of job enrichment
and empowerment’ as advocated by certain
humanistic organisational change
specialists. (Economist, 1991)
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• Multiskilling refers to training workers to
be able to undertake a wide range of
different jobs, instead of just one.
• Cordery (1995) classified multiskilling
into 4 types.
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1. VERTICAL MULTISKILLING:
The extent to which supervisory or
administrative support tasks are learned
by individuals.
2. HORIZONTAL MULTISKILLING:
This is learning skills from another
discipline or function within an
organisation.
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• SKILL BROADENING : Where minor elements
and tasks are learned on top of the predominant
activity (major task). So expertise is maintained in
the major task with elements added to increase
efficiency.
• CROSS SKILLING/DUAL SKILLING : Where
another major activity is learned in addition to
the main craft and a person is considered
competent to carry out any activity in these two
main disciplines.
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 DEPTH
MULTISKILLING:
This
is
the
acquisition and application of more complex,
specific skills within the same trade or
discipline.
 MULTISKILLED TEAMS: A multiskilled
team is a group of individuals who collectively
have a range of skills.
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1. Traditional single skilled individuals collected
into one team and managed by one supervisor,
or
2. A team of multiskilled individuals.
The intent is to have a team where the strengths
and specialities are combined, which increases
the range of skills available to tackle certain
issues.
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• The concept of Indradhanush challenges the
theory of ‘one person - one role’.
• The aim of this development model is to train
people and make them ‘green’ in
multiple competencies.
• The model includes a carefully crafted Multiskill index to measure progress.
(As explained by Dr. Tanaya Mishra, Chief
People Officer, ACC Concrete)
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• The model encompasses 3 phases:
1. Plotting a multi-skilled profile for each
of the plant personnel.
2. Developmental initiatives through OTJ
training.
3. Assessments and remapping.
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Each colour code had an interpretation:
Red: Not capable of handling the job role even with support.
Yellow: Capable of handling the function under supervision
and support.
Green: Capable of handling the function independently.
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• Each colour box was then assigned a score. Once
complete, the whole matrix was converted into a
commonly understood index.
• The programme began with 2.26 index points out
of 5. Within the first 6 months, the index moved
up by 22 percent.
• By the end of 2010, the target was to achieve an
index of 3.5. Efforts were made using well
structured on-the-job training through coaches
who are not only experts in the core subject but
also specially trained in coaching skills.
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• The process is now well established and has
brought
tremendous
benefits
to
the organization, in terms of helping it
maintain its lean and agile structure, which
in turn boosts competitiveness.
• The whole process has also answered issues
related to role enhancement, increase in
operational efficiency, optimization of
manpower, better shift management and
leave plans, career development, filling
recruitment gaps and succession planning.
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It is important to understand who needs to get multi
skilled. Do they need to be at a particular level or position,
or doing a specific work? Interestingly, most experts do
believe that being multi-skilled is level-agnostic.
1.
2.
Technical staff- People trained in technical skills need
to have mastery over more than one platform
Non-technical staff- The non-technical staff can be
trained in support functions to save an organization
considerable cost.
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• Training should preferably be in
related/adjacent fields, so that the existing
skills of the employees are appropriately
leveraged.
• Multiskilling is not so much about a
particular level or category of employees.
It is about a mindset. It is about skill sets
and it is fairly level-agnostic.
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In an era of specialization, the downturn has interestingly brought
into focus the necessity of having a multi-skilled workforce.
• Multi-skilled workforce helps to avoid retrenchment, reduce hiring
and increase efficiency.
• Possession of an additional skill goes a long way in opening new
channels and opportunities for professionals.
• It allows the company to bring about cost-cutting in various forms
and more importantly, an individual does not become
indispensable for the company, or rather a company need not
depend on a particular person for doing a specialized job in which
he is an expert.
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• A multi-skilled workforce helps in addressing
customer demand faster and better.
• It would be self-managed and flexible according to
the requirements of the company.
• From the perspective of the employee, multi-tasking
would allow them to become diversified and maintain
high levels of motivation and enthusiasm.
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Multiskilling can be developed through a
variety of techniques which are as follows:
 Coaching and Mentoring
 Job-Rotation
 Job-Shadowing
 Self-Learning
 Temping
 Team-based Cross-functional projects
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COACHING
• Takes place between worker and supervisor
− Can provide specific performance improvement and
correction
MENTORING
• Senior employee paired with a junior employee
(“protégé”)
− Helps to learn the ropes
− Prepares protégé for future advancement
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• JOB ROTATION
− Train on different tasks/positions
− Often used to train entry-level managers
− Also used to provide back-up in production
positions
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• Job shadowing is a career exploration activity that
offers an opportunity to spend time with a
professional currently working in a person’s career
field of interest. Job shadowing offers a chance to see
what it’s actually like working in a specific job.
• The new hire may spend one to five days following
the routine of the employee, learning general job
responsibilities, observing how the tasks are carried
out, and getting some insight into methods that allow
for efficient handling of the job.
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In self-directed learning (SDL), the individual takes
the initiative and the responsibility for what occurs.
Individuals select, manage, and assess their own
learning activities, which can be pursued at any time,
in any place, through any means, at any age. In
schools, teachers can work toward SDL a stage at a
time. Teaching emphasizes SDL skills, processes, and
systems rather than content coverage and tests. For the
individual, SDL involves initiating personal challenge
activities and developing the personal qualities to
pursue them successfully.
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• Temping means working short employment stints with a
variety of clients, usually through a temping agency
or staffing firm. Although temporary, the worker bases
his/her working life around this kind of work as it offers
increased flexibility and variety
• Temping is a tri-party agreement, between the client
company, the third party vendor and the employee (also
known as associate or temp.
• The temp workers work in the facility of the client
companies, but receive salary and benefits from the temp
agencies.
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• New forms of learning by doing seem to
be emerging. Technology could play a
role in finding innovative ways to enable
skills
development
and
greater
understanding of personal actions,
reactions and decisions.
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• Workforce is more flexible.
• Helps in change management.
• Employees are better prepared to anticipate problems or
requirements or other areas.
• Employees can assume other tasks when there is
absenteeism.
• Employees can be moved into other positions at peak
operational time.
• Employees become more aware of the work flow.
• More talent available for the organizations.
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• Out of the box thinking, influx of new ideas, creative
solutions through role reversals and lateral moves.
• People in different functional areas are connected.
• Increasing task variety increases employee satisfaction.
• Greater employability for employees.
• Contributes towards employee training & development.
• Cost-effectiveness and cost-cutting.
• Better cope-up with technological change.
• Test trainees, helps identify person’s strengths &
weaknesses.
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• Demotivates intelligent and aggressive employees who seek
specific responsibility.
• Eventually creates a number of employees with limited job
knowledge.
• Encourages generalization, more appropriate for developing
line managers than functional staff.
• Sometimes, there is an undercurrent of frustration.
• New jobs, environment and learning can unnerve employees.
• Employees fear not living up to expectations.
• Employees are uncomfortable with the changes and cannot
deal with the conflict of the role and their personality.
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MULTISKILLING
WORK SPECIALIZATION
•Makes employee stretch to the limits
•Jobs can become to simplified
•Needs constant support and
thorough guidance throughout the
process of acquiring multiple skills
•Employees become bored and tired,
safety problems and accident rates
increases
•Being a developmental process
makes it slow
•Absenteeism rises
•Very Sensitive issue, it is imperative
to find right person for right job in
right time
•Quality of work may suffer
•Small businesses by necessity have
multiskilled people
•Industries employee specialized
workers
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PARAMETERS
MULTISKILLING
WORK SPECIALIZATION
Quality
High
High
Speed
High
Moderate
Dependability
High
Moderate
Flexibility
High
Low
Cost
High
Low
Health and safety
High
Low
Quality of working life
Low
Moderate
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• Human Resource Development, Jon M. Werner & Randy L.
Desimone, Pg. 151-201,Eighth Edition, Cengage Learning India
Pvt. Ltd.
• http://wps.pearsoned.co.uk/ema_uk_he_slack_opsman_4/17/4472/1
144953.cw/index.html (Retrieved February,2012)
• http://www.hrprofessor.com/article6.html(Retrieved
February,2012)
• http://hsc.csu.edu.au/ind_tech/ind_study/2530/Multiskilling.htm
l (Retrieved February,2012)
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