History of the toothbrush

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In ancient times there was no such thing as a
toothbrush. People would chew feathers, twigs,
animal bones or porcupine quills.
The first toothbrush was discovered dating
from 3,000 years ago.
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In Japan the toothbrush was made of horse
hairs.
The very first mass produced toothbrush was
manufactured around the year 1780.
It was made of animal bone and bristles.
Later bristles were made for pig or badger hair.
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The first patent for a tooth brush was in 1857 in
the United States.
Mass production began in 1885.
Later it was discovered that the use of animal
hair was not very health and the hairs would
keep bacteria on them.
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It was not until World War 2 that brushing
teeth became a routine practice.
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The early Egyptians would mix burned ox
hooves mixed with eggshells, myrrh, pumice
and water.
Later, the Persians would use burned oyster
and snail shells.
In both cases, toothpaste was for only the very
rich.
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In the early 1700s, toothpaste was made of
borax but it was very abrasive and wear down
the enamel of the teeth which would lead to
decay.
Prior to world war 2, toothpaste was in lead tin
boxes but the lead would get into the
toothpaste and cause problems for the user.
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During world war 2, that method was changed
to aluminum and paper like we see today.
Finally after research, by the 1950s, fluoride
was added to toothpaste to help prevent tooth
decay.
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