Ch 4 SS pp 55 -64 Roots of our population

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A PLACE TO LIVE
Aboriginal Peoples (49 - 63)
Population Patterns
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1) Reviewing table 4.1 on p. 50, rank the provinces
from highest population density to the lowest.
2) Reviewing table 4.2 on p. 50, match the
following terms with the diagram: clustered,
compact, loose-knit, linear.
3) Explain the differences between “urban center”
and “rural area.”
4) Compare the terms “urban pull” and “rural push”
what is the likely outcome of these factors?
Population Patterns
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5) Look at fig. 4.4 p. 51, what is the general trend
shown in the graph? How does the population
growth in Atlantic Canada compare to the rest of
Canada?
6) What is outmigration? What is the destination of
many who leave?
7) What was the name formerly given to
Fredericton, N.B.? What was the cause of its growth
in the early 1780’s? (5)
The Innu
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The Innu are believed to be descendants of the
Maritime Archaic people who lived 9000 - 3000
years ago
They live in the area of the Quebec/Labrador
peninsula
French explorers classified this group into two
subgroups 1) Montagnais 2) Naskapi
The Innu

Today, the Innu call their
land Nitassinan, and do
not recognize the
political boundaries of
Quebec and Labrador
Algonquian Nations
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Lived in what is now Atlantic Canada
Spent a lot of time hunting, fishing, trapping, and
trading
The Algonquian Nations included three nations:
1) Mi’kmaq ( NS, PEI, and parts of NL)
2) Passamaquoddy (in parts of NB)
3) Maliseet (in parts of NB)
The Inuit
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The north of the Atlantic region was home to the
Palaeoeskimo
it is believed these groups crossed the Bering Strait
from Siberia, reaching Labrador 3800 years ago.
one group, the Dorset, disappeared about 1000
years ago.
The Inuit

Another group. The
Thule, arrived in about
1300 and are the
ancestors of today’s
Labrador Inuit
The Beothuk
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lived in Newfoundland
hunted and fished along the coast and in the
interior
they were very susceptible to European diseases
involved in conflicts with European settlers
The Beothuk

Beothuk became extinct
when the last known
member, Shawnandithit,
died in 1829 of
tuberculosis
Effects of Contact
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
The Aboriginal peoples taught the first Europeans
how to survive in the harsh conditions posed by the
environment of what is now Atlantic Canada.
However, the Europeans were ethnocentric (believed
that their culture and beliefs were better than those
of the Aboriginal peoples) and did not appreciate or
understand the Aboriginal peoples.
Effects of Contact
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As a result, problems developed in parts of the
region, one such problem was found in NS, NB, and
PEI, as Aboriginal peoples became regulated by
Canadian law and were forced off their native
land/migration routes onto reserves.
Today, Aboriginal peoples are negotiating claims with
provincial and federal governments to reclaim the
land natively used by their ancestors and the right to
self-government
Questions (p.55 - 56)
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1) The term Aboriginal peoples is used to refer to
who?
2) Different Aboriginal groups, while living in
harmony with their environment, differed from each
other in what ways? Name three.
3) When do some archaeologists believe that
Aboriginal groups first migrated to the Atlantic
Canadian region? Why? From where?
Questions (p.55 - 56)
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4) Using Fig. 4.7, what generalizations can be made
about the migration of Aboriginal peoples from AD
500 to present?
5) For each group, list the following:
original location Arrived in Atlantic Canada subgroups present location -
Effects of Contact p.56
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1) How did the aboriginal peoples help the
Europeans when they first moved into the Atlantic
region?
Syrup
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2) define ethnocentrism.
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3) What was a problem which developed from this
lack of understanding?
Effects of Contact p.56


4) Why do Aboriginal
leaders negotiate with
provincial and federal
governments today?
Assembly of First
Nations Chief Phil
Fontaine >
EARLY EUROPEAN
SETTLEMENT
Chapter 4 pp. 57-58
Social Studies Research Project
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Assignment: Research a culture which has
contributed to the current population of Atlantic
Canada.
Guidelines: Individual assignment, but you may
conduct research in pairs.
2 library classes, 1 classroom
Format: w-book
Social Studies Research Project
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Students are expected to:
1) make point form notes from at least 2 sources
2) Complete written display using information found
3) present book to the class
Possible cultures: Innu
Algonquian Nations
Inuit Beothuk
Acadians English
Welsh
Scottish
African-Canadian
others you may wish to explore
Social Studies Research Project
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You will be evaluated on the following:
1) Research skills – how well you work in the
library 5 marks
2) Presentation – oral presentation to class
highlighting interesting aspects 5 marks
3) Final product – the actual w-book you pass in.
Remember to include a bibliography or works sited
list – 10 marks Total 20 marks for the project.
1
2
Title
Student:
Class
Date:
Map /Chart / Graph
Student created
3
4
Fact Sheet
Point form notes on
topic
Written Description
Paragraph format
5
6
Artwork
Picture related to
topic
Sources
List all books / articles
used
Early European Settlement
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
In the early 1600's, English and French settlers came
to Atlantic Canada to tap its resources (fish and
fur).
During the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, the
British and French battled for control of Atlantic
Canada. In 1763, the Treaty of Paris gave England
control over the region.
Early European Settlement
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British infantry 1756-1763
Early European Settlement
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Newfoundland was settled by English fishermen who
would come to the area each spring. They fished all
summer and went back to England before the start
of fall weather. Gradually, they began to stay
through the winter and set up permanent
settlements.
Early European Settlement
Large numbers of Irish immigrants also helped
to populate Newfoundland in the early 1700's.
 P. 57
 1) Why did English and French settlers come to
Atlantic Canada in the early 1600's?
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2) In 1763, what did the Treaty of Paris do to
Atlantic Canada?
Acadians
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1) Describe the population growth of the Acadians
in the late 1600's.
2) In the early 1700's as the British gained control
of the land, what did they ask the Acadian people
to do?
3) What happened to the Acadian people in 1755?
Why? Where did they go?
The Deportation of the Acadians
SETTLERS OF BRITISH
ORIGIN PP 59-60
Settlers of British Origin
1) Describe the pattern of early
settlement in early Newfoundland.
 2) What happened to the lands in the
Annapolis Valley formerly occupied by
the Acadians?
 3) Why did the Loyalists come to
Canada? When? Where did they settle?

Settlers of British Origin
4) What new colony was created because
of the arrival of the Loyalists?
 5) Why did the first Scottish settlers come
to North America? When? Where did
they settle?
 6) Why did the first Irish settlers come to
North America? When? Where did they
settle?
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Settlers of British Origin
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Loyalists, drawing lots for Acadian lands.
Settlers of British Origin
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7) Why were the Irish different than most other
settlers to Atlantic Canada? To which group did they
have the most in common? Why?
Irish Orphans
AFRICAN – CANADIAN
COMMUNITIES
pp 61 - 62
African – Canadian Communities
1) Who is believed to be the first person of
African descent to live in Canada? Where did
he live, and what did he do for a living?
 2) A) In the 1600’s – 1700’s, what were most
people of African descent brought to North
America to do? B) What other jobs did they
have?
 3) Use Fig. 4.16 to make a timeline illustrating
the immigration and emigration by Africans.

African – Canadian Communities
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4) What is Africville?
5) Why was it so important to the people who lived
there?
6) What happened to Africville? Why?
Africville: Expropriating Black Nova Scotians | CBC
Archives
IMMIGRATION IN THE
TWENTIETH CENTURY
pp. 63 - 64
Immigration in the Twentieth Century
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1) During the late 1800s and early 1900s, where
were most immigrants encouraged to settle? By
who?
2) During what two periods did Atlantic Canada
receive larger waves of immigrants?
3) What is a war bride? Following WWII, what
happened to these women?
Immigration in the Twentieth Century
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4) What is a refugee?
During the 1990s, where did most refugees
arriving in Canada come from?
5) Using the Fig 4.20, summarize the changes you
see in the sources of immigration between 1956
and 1976.
Chapter 4 Test Review
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Know the following definitions:
out migration population density
refugee
population distribution rural push rural area
urban pull urban center
Be able to explain:
Why PEI has a high population density and NL has
a low one.
Why the Acadians were expelled from Atlantic
Canada.
Chapter 4 Test Review
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Why did Irish immigrants come to Canada?
What effect did contact with European settlers have
on Aboriginal people already living in Atlantic
Canada?
What is Africville and why is it so important to
African Canadians living in Atlantic Canada?
What is a war bride and why did they immigrate to
Canada?
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