Satire Terms

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For The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Unit

 a literary technique used to ridicule or make fun of human vice or weakness  often with the intent of correcting or changing the subject of the attack

Juvenalian

Horatian

 After the Roman satirist Juvenal  Formal satire in which the speaker attacks vice and error with contempt and indignation  Juvenalian satire in its realism and its harshness is in strong contrast to Horatian satire.

 After the Roman satirist Horace  Satire in which the voice is indulgent, tolerant, amused, and witty.

 The speaker holds up to gentle ridicule the absurdities and follies of human beings  Aims at producing in the reader not the anger of a Juvenal, but a wry smile.

 Hyperbole  Incongruity  Reversal  Parody  Sarcasm  Juxtaposition  Irony  Understatement  Double Entendre

 To over exaggerate the situation beyond its normal bounds, so it becomes ridiculous  Enlarge or increase size as well  Example: “I’m starving. I could eat a horse.”

 To present things that are out of place or are absurd in relation to its surroundings.  Example: Princess Fiona uses ponytail to knock out Merry Men, pauses mid-flight to fix her hair.

 To present the opposite of the normal order  e.g. the order of events, hierarchical order  Example: Fiona saves Shrek (women are supposed to be damsels, not men)

To imitate the techniques and/or style of some person, place, or thing.

 Robin Williams doing impressions  Dressing up at President Bush and talking like him

 is stating the opposite of an intended meaning especially in order to sneeringly, slyly, jest or mock a person, situation or thing  Example: “That’s cool.” (when you actually hate it)   Talking about how much you think a candidate is doing a good job in a mocking tone Oscar Wilde wrote, “I am not young enough to know everything.”

 an act or instance of placing close together or side by side, esp. for comparison or contrast.

 Example: Humanitarians— Brittney Spears and Mother Teresa

 the use of words to convey a meaning that is the opposite of its literal meaning 

the irony of her reply, “How nice!” when I said I had to work all weekend.

 Sideshow Bob, “I'm aware of the irony of appearing on TV in order to decry it."

 A play on words  a word or expression capable of two interpretations with one usually risqué    Iraqi Head Seeks Arms Plane Too Close to Ground, Crash Probe Told Saying in response, “That’s what she said.”

YOU MAY NOT USE DOUBLE ENTENDRE IN YOUR PROJECTS OR DURING CLASS! WE DISCUSS IT ONLY SO THAT YOU KNOW IT’S THERE!

 is used to make something appear smaller or less important than it really is. It can be used to entertain or to reduce the importance of the truth.

 Example: “It’s just a flesh wound.” (Black Knight in Holy Grail when his arm has fallen off)

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