Lesson VIII Power Point (10/5)

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Lesson VIII
Ablative of Place Where
Ablative of Means
iniuria,
iniuriae (f.)
injustice, wrong,
injury
memoria,
memoriae (f.)
memory
poena,
poenae (f.)
punishment, penalty
provincia,
provinciae (f.)
province
pugna,
pugnae (f.)
fight, battle
victoria,
victoriae (f.)
victory
incito,
incitare,
incitavi,
incitatus
excite, stir up, incite
occupo,
occupare,
occupavi,
occupatus
seize (hold of)
pugno,
pugnare,
pugnavi,
pugnatus
fight
servo,
servare,
servavi,
servatus
save, guard
The Noun Kingdom
Abby Ablative
Abby was the baby of the family. She was always IN
things, UNDER things, and crawling FROM room to
room. Like many small children, she could also be
MEAN to her siblings!
Ablative Endings
Case
Singular
Nominative (subject)
Genitive (“of”)
Dative (“to”/ “for”)
Accusative (direct obj.)
Ablative
Plural
a
ae
ae
am
ae
arum
is
as
a
is
Case
Sg.
Pl.
Nom. (subject)
Gen. (“of”)
Dat. (“to”/ “for”)
Acc. (direct obj.)
us
i
o
um
i
orum
is
os
Abl.
o
is
Awesome Ablatives!
• The ABLATIVE case has many uses.
• There are as many as 15 uses for the
ablative.
• Today we’ll learn 2: ablative of place
where and ablative of means.
Ablative of Place Where
• A very long name for a very easy concept!
• Use the ablative case after the Latin word
IN.
• “in” can mean “in” or “on” depending on
the context
• Where is the boat? in aqua
• Where is the girl? in casa
• Where is the sailor? in undis
• Where is the farmer? in equo
• Where is the queen? in carro
iniuria,
iniuriae (f.)
injustice, wrong,
injury
memoria,
memoriae (f.)
memory
poena,
poenae (f.)
punishment, penalty
provincia,
provinciae (f.)
province
pugna,
pugnae (f.)
fight, battle
victoria,
victoriae (f.)
victory
incito,
incitare,
incitavi,
incitatus
excite, stir up, incite
occupo,
occupare,
occupavi,
occupatus
seize (hold of)
pugno,
pugnare,
pugnavi,
pugnatus
fight
servo,
servare,
servavi,
servatus
save, guard
Ablative of Means
• An ablative word can be used to express
the instrument or means by which a
person does something.
• This is called the ablative of means.
• In English, we have to say “by…” or
“with…” to express the same thing.
Ablative of Means
How does a cook stir the soup?
with a spoon
Ablative of Means
How does the baseball player hit the ball?
with a bat
Ablative of Means
How does the child color the picture?
with crayons
Ablative of Means
• The phrases with a spoon, with a bat, with
crayons would be ablatives of means in
Latin.
• The ablative of means does NOT use a
Latin word for “with.” You have to add it in
the English.
• This is similar to how genitives use “of”
and datives use “to” even though those
words aren’t written in the Latin, either.
Examples!
• Cibum carro portamus.
• We carry the food with a cart.
• Romani Siciliam pugnis occupant.
• The Romans seize Sicily by battles.
Wait a Minute…How Can I Tell?
• You’ll notice some endings are the same
for dative and ablative.
• Remember: an ablative of means is
usually a THING, not a person or animal.
• If there’s a light bulb verb in the sentence
(giving, showing, telling), then it may be a
dative like we learned earlier.
Things to Take Away from
Today’s Lesson
• Ablatives use the endings –a, -o, and –is.
• Ablatives can show place where after the
word in.
• Ablatives can show “by means of” without
using a word for “with” or “by.”
• Puella est in casa. The girl is in the
house.
• Puella vitam equi cibo servat. The girl
saves the life of the horse with food.
pugno,
pugnare,
pugnavi,
pugnatus
fight
provincia,
provinciae (f.)
province
memoria,
memoriae (f.)
memory
poena,
poenae (f.)
punishment, penalty
occupo,
occupare,
occupavi,
occupatus
seize (hold of)
victoria,
victoriae (f.)
victory
incito,
incitare,
incitavi,
incitatus
excite, stir up, incite
pugna,
pugnae (f.)
fight, battle
iniuria,
iniuriae (f.)
injustice, wrong,
injury
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