Do the Math NCAT 2013 JohnSquires

advertisement
Do the Math
John Squires, Chattanooga State Community College

Redesign the Whole Course
› Continuous Improvement isn’t Possible Without Teamwork

Ongoing Assessment & Prompt Feedback
› Students need to always know how they are doing.
Technology can help provide this.

Active Learning
› Students don’t learn anything if they don’t do anything.

Individual Assistance
› When students struggle they need help.

Time on Task
› Course layout can help keep students engaged.

3 Developmental Math Classes
› Basic Math, Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra
› Emporium Model, Mastery Learning, 1+ 2 Format
› Weekly Expectations, Points for Everything

7 College Math Classes
› College Algebra, Finite Math, Statistics (1 + 2)
› Precalculus I & II, Applied Trig, Business Calculus (2 + 1)

Scheduling Benefits
› Continuous Enrollment Plan
› One Room Schoolhouse

Results
› Developmental math success increased from 51% to 67%
› College math success increased from 71% to 76%

Developmental Math
› 2 Shell Courses to fit new TBR Guidelines
› Emporium Model, Mastery Learning, 2 + 2 Format
› MyMathLab, Mini Lectures, Videos, Course Workbook

College Math
› Replacement/Emporium Model
› Contemporary Math, College Algebra, Statistics
› Pre-calculus I & II, Calculus I & II
› Math for Elementary Teachers

Results
› Exit rate went from 23% 2007-08 to 33% 2010-11
› Withdrawal rate cut in half (13% 07-08 to 5% 10-11)
› 500 more students in college math than dev math F2012
Cleveland State Math Department
1000
900
800
700
600
500
College Math
400
Dev Math
300
200
100
0
Chattanooga State Math Department
3000
2500
2000
1500
College Math
Dev Math
1000
500
0
Students Passing College Math
Cleveland State
Chattanooga State
2007F
334
1143
2011F
633
1810
% increase
71
58

Tenn. Board of Regents (Schutz & Tingle)
 Strong positive impact on course success
 Strong positive impact on next course success

Harvard University (Boatman)
 “Among those enrolled in developmental math,
however, students completed an average of 3.3
credits more of their attempted credits (or an
average of one course) than their peers assigned to
college-level math.”
 “At Cleveland State, the redesigned courses led to
more college-level credits after two years.”

Cleveland State Redesign
◦ TBR and UF studies found that gender and race were
no longer factors in predicting course success –
achievement gaps were closed

Chattanooga State Redesign
◦ Low – income students tracked and compared to all
students in terms of course success, accelerated
learning, and fall to spring retention
◦ No gaps were found, low-income students performed
as well as other students across the board in all areas

Getting students to Do the Math

Helping Struggling Students

Making Sure They Learn the Material – Mastery
Learning
I believe that mastery learning is the critical missing
link in the education of low achievers.
Patricia K. Cross, 1976 Accent on Learning

ECHO (Early College Hybrid Online)
Courses Offered as Online Courses with Onground Assistance – Classes Meet At Least Two
Days A Week in Computer Classroom
College Teachers and High School Teachers
Work as a Team
Provides Quality Assurance
Expands Opportunities for Early College
ECHO can be offered in any high school

97% Success Rate, 3.3 Course GPA





ECHO Enrollment
300
250
200
150
Students
100
50
0
2010S
2010F
2011S
2011F
2012S
2012F
2013S
16
14
12
10
8
High Schools
Courses
6
4
2
0
“My Math Lab”
› Built to capacity, friendly atmosphere
› Most utilized resource on campus
 Online Resources
› Fully integrated, quality throughout
› Guided learning path
 Program Expectations
› Well established and reasonable
› Provide structure, keep students on task
 Patience
› Changing a culture takes time

University of Alabama
My Teachable Moment
Questions?
John Squires
[email protected]
Download
Related flashcards
Create Flashcards