Studieren und promovieren in Deutschland

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Studying in Germany
Welcome to the Land of Ideas!
Studying in Germany | Page 2
Contents
•
Facts about Germany
•
The German Academic Exchange Service
•
The German university system
•
Studying in Germany
•
Doctoral programmes in Germany
•
More information
Facts about Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 3
German inventions and discoveries
•
X-rays – Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen, 1895
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Aspirin – Bayer, 1897
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Toothpaste – Ottomar Heinsius von Mayenburg, 1907
•
Television – Manfred von Ardenne, 1930
•
MP3 – Fraunhofer-Institut, Karlheinz Brandenburg, 1995
•
Automobile – Karl Benz, Gottlieb Daimler, 1886
•
Airbag – Mercedes Benz, 1971
Facts about Germany
German Nobel Prize winners
Studying in Germany | Page 4
25 German Nobel laureates in
the last 25 years, including:
•
Literature: Günter Grass, 1999;
Herta Müller, 2009
•
Chemistry: Gerhard Ertl, 2007
•
Physics:
Klaus von Klitzing, 1985;
Theodor W. Hänsch, 2005;
Peter Grünberg, 2007
•
Medicine:
Christiane Nüsslein-Volhard, 1995;
Harald zur Hausen, 2008
•
Economics: Reinhard Selten, 1994
Facts about Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 5
German corporations
•
Mercedes, BMW, VW
•
Puma, Adidas
•
Bayer
•
Siemens, SAP
Facts about Germany
Geography
•
Great Britain
•
Sweden
Population: 80.5 million,
about 7 million foreign citizens
Geographic location:
In the heart of Europe,
diverse landscapes,
mountains, coastal regions,
North and Baltic Seas
Denmark
Baltic Sea
North Sea
Netherlands
Belgium
Hamburg
Berlin
Cologne
Frankfurt a.M.
Czech Republic
Luxembourg
Munich
Studying in Germany | Page 6
•
Poland
Climate: Temperate ranging from
Switzerland
Mediterranean to Continental
France
climates
Italy
Austria
Facts about Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 7
Foreign students in Germany
•
More than 2.6 million students in
Germany, nearly 12 % foreigners.
•
Most foreign students come from
China and Russia.
Source: Statistisches Bundesamt, 2014
Facts about Germany
Origin of foreign students
Origin of foreigneducated students
(Bildungsausländer)
in Germany
Asia
29.1 %
Europe
56 %
Studying in Germany | Page 8
Africa
8.1 %
Other
0.6 %
The Americas
6.2 %
Source: Wissenschaft weltoffen, 2013
Facts about Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 9
Cultural and religious diversity in
Germany
•
Multicultural society
•
Largest immigrant groups from
Turkey, Poland, Italy, Serbia,
Croatia, Greece, Romania,
Russia
•
Individual nationalities cultivate
their own language and culture at
nationally-specific cultural
institutions.
Facts about Germany
Cultural and religious diversity in
Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 10
The German constitution guarantees all
citizens the freedom of religion:
“Freedom of faith and of conscience,
and freedom to profess a religious or
philosophical creed, shall be inviolable.“
•
Approximately 60 % of the German population are Christians, comprised
almost equally of Protestants and Catholics.
•
Approximately 5 % of the population are Muslims.
•
Germany is also home to Jews, Hindus, Buddhists and Orthodox
Christians.
Source: Bundeszentrale für politische
Bildung, 2014
The German Academic Exchange Service
Studying in Germany | Page 11
What is the DAAD?
•
Independent organisation of
German institutions of higher
education
•
Members: 239 universities and
research institutes, 122 student
bodies
•
Headquarters in Bonn
•
15 foreign-based branch offices and 55 information centres
•
More than 250 different programmes
•
About 75,000 scholarship recipients each year
Der Deutsche Akademische Austauschdienst
Goals and tasks of the DAAD
Three strategic areas of activity
• Grant scholarships for the best

so that the professionals and leaders of tomorrow can gain qualifications at the best locations, prepare for
positions of responsibility and cultivate contacts throughout the world.
Studying in Germany | Page 12
• Structures for internationalisation

so that higher education institutions can improve the quality of research and instruction and address the
challenges of the future with strong partners

so that more people can cross borders and achieve success in study and research

so that German remains an important language of culture and scholarship

so that higher education institutions may contribute to development and build bridges to surmount conflicts.
• Expertise for academic collaboration

so that academic and political leaders are able to make well-informed policy decisions.
DAAD-Budget 2013
Federal Ministry for Economic
Cooperation and Development (BMZ):
€ 40 million = 9 %
Federal Ministry of Education and
Research (BMBF):
€ 100 million = 24 %
BMBF
European Union (EU):
€ 58 million = 14 %
BMZ
EU
Total:
420 Mio.
EUR
Federal Foreign Office (AA):
€ 181 million = 43 %
Other
Other funding bodies:
€ 41 million = 10 %
Studying in Germany | Page 13
AA
*Figures: 2013
The German Academic Exchange Service
Studying in Germany | Page 14
Network
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 15
University tradition
•
Humboldt’s vision of education:
“Unity and freedom of research
and instruction”
•
Rich diversity of institutions and
programmes at a high academic level
•
About 430 institutions of higher
education in Germany, oldest
universities: Heidelberg, Cologne,
Erfurt
•
More than 300,000 instructors
and researchers at German
universities
Source: Wissenschaft weltoffen, 2013
Statistisches Bundesamt, 2014
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 16
Institutions of higher education
•
Universities
•
Technical universities
•
Universities of applied sciences
•
Colleges of music, art and film
•
Private colleges and academies
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 17
Universities
•
Total: 106
•
Focus on methodical and theoretical
knowledge
•
Students may choose courses of interest,
not all courses are prescribed
•
Research-based final thesis
•
Wide range of subjects
•
Degrees: bachelor’s, master’s, doctoral,
post doctoral, as well as traditional
German degrees (Diplom, Magister and
state examination)
Source: Statistisches Bundesamt, 2014
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 18
Universities of applied sciences
•
Total: 212
•
Highly praxis-oriented with close
connection to the professional world
•
Fixed course groups (“classes”)
•
Praxis-oriented final thesis
•
Typical subjects: Engineering,
Business Administration, Social
Sciences, Design
•
Degrees: bachelor’s, master’s and
the traditional German Diplom (FH)
Source: Statistisches Bundesamt, 2014
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 19
Colleges of art, music and film
•
Total: 53
•
Highly praxis-oriented
•
Admission frequently based on the
merits of a portfolio and aptitude test
•
Artistic and design-oriented subjects:
Design, Graphic Arts, Music, Voice,
Directing, Camera, etc.
•
Degrees: bachelor’s, master’s,
doctorate and traditional German
degrees (Diplom and, in some cases,
state examination)
Source: Statistisches Bundesamt, 2014
Das deutsche Hochschulsystem
Studieren und Promovieren in Deutschland | Seite 20
Private colleges and academies
•
Total: 113
•
Mostly universities of applied
sciences
•
Small study groups
•
Closely linked to the economy
•
Strong international orientation
•
Degrees: bachelor’s, master’s,
doctorate
•
Partly high tuition fees
•
Important: Make sure the private
university is officially recognised!
Quelle: Hochschulkompass 2014
The German university system
Studying in Germany | Page 21
Degree programmes
•
Bachelor’s, master’s,
doctoral degrees
•
Traditional German degrees:
Diplom, Magister
The German university system
German language skills
Studying in Germany | Page 22
German is the language of instruction for most
degree programmes at German universities.
Depending on your university and degree
programme, a certificate of German language
proficiency may be required for admission:
•
Abitur from a German-language school
•
Kleines or Großes Deutsches
Sprachdiplom from the Goethe-Institut
•
Zentrale Oberstufenprüfung from the Goethe-Institut
•
Deutsches Sprachdiplom (Stufe II) from the Kultusministerkonferenz
•
TestDaF
•
DSH
The German university system
German language skills
•
The Test of German as a Foreign Language (TestDaF) is offered
up to six times a year in Germany and over 90 other countries
around the world. For more info, visit www.testdaf.de
•
The German Language University Entrance Examination (DSH) is
only administered at universities in Germany. For more
information, contact the International Office at the university of your
choice. Addresses at: www.daad.de/aaa
Studying in Germany | Page 23
Candidates must pay an examination fee before taking these tests.
Fees may vary depending on the administering institution.
The German university system
International programmes
There are over 1,600 international degree programmes throughout Germany.
•
Bachelor’s, master’s, and structured doctoral programmes
•
Internationally recognized degree
•
Language of instruction is generally English, frequently supplemented by
German language courses
•
Intensive academic advising for international students
Studying in Germany | Page 24
For more info, visit our database:
www.daad.de/international-programmes
Source: DAAD, 2014
Studying in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 25
Schedule
•
November gather information
•
January
obtain application of admission
•
March
update passport (if necessary),
submit application of admission
•
June
apply for entry visa (if applicable)
•
September semester begins,
take out health insurance policy,
find accommodation
•
November extend visa (if applicable)
Studying in Germany
Application
Studying in Germany | Page 26
Depending on the institution and your country of origin, there are
various ways to apply for admission to a German university:
•
Direct application to the university
•
uni-assist enables students to simultaneously apply at several
universities www.uni-assist.de
•
For subjects with a central numerus clausus (NC) (= a centrally
regulated admissions policy that applies to the whole of Germany)
application via www.hochschulstart.de
Studying in Germany
Admission and visa
As an international student, you may require a visa depending on where you
come from and how long you intend to stay in Germany. Please inquire about
visa requirements at the German embassy in your country.
Studying in Germany | Page 27
What do I need for a visa?
•
Passport
•
Notification of admission from the
German university (in some cases)
•
Proof of financial support
•
Confirmation of health insurance
coverage
•
Visa application
•
2 passport photos
Studying in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 28
Tuition fees
•
As a rule no general tuition fees are
incurred at state universities
•
Semester contribution of up to € 200
per semester (administrative costs,
student union contribution for student
dining, sports, cultural events and a
semester ticket)
•
Inquire about the exact cost of tuition fees
at the university in question
Studying in Germany
Scholarships
Many organisations in Germany offer scholarships. In addition to those
awarded by the DAAD, students can apply for a wide range of grants and
scholarships from other institutions, such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Politically-affiliated foundations
Business-affiliated foundations
German federal states
Social institutions and churches
Research institutes
Student organisations
Studying in Germany | Page 29
Look for a scholarship suited to your major, country of origin and academic
level: www.funding-guide.de
Studying in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 30
Part-time work
•
Many students in Germany
take a part-time job to
supplement their parental
allowance, financial aid or
scholarships.
•
EU citizens are allowed to
work as much as German
students and have free access
to the job market.
•
Students from non-EU countries are allowed to work 120 full
days or 240 half days without a work permit. University tutors or
research assistants may work longer. The Aliens’ Registration
Office must always be informed of such work contracts.
Studieren in Deutschland
Studying in Germany | Page 31
Job and career after studying
•
Blue Card Germany makes the German
job market especially appealing to
international graduates
•
Students from non-EU countries are
allowed to remain in Germany for the
purpose of looking for employment for a
maximum of 18 months after graduating.
•
While looking for permanent full-time employment, you are allowed
to work as much as you like.
•
The website www.make-it-in-germany.com informs about job
perspectives, working permits, moving and settling in and gives tips if
your family is also living in Germany.
Doctoral programmes in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 32
Individual doctoral programmes
•
Supervised by a university professor
(Doktorvater or Doktormutter)
•
Find out in advance which professor would
be best suited to supervise your research
project
•
Doctoral candidates work independently
•
Requires good organisational skills and a
high degree of self-discipline
•
Provides candidates the freedom to explore
their research interests in more depth
Doctoral programmes in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 33
Structured doctoral programmes
•
Candidates are integrated into a
programme with a fixed structure
similar to other degree programmes
•
Candidates participate in a research
training group, graduate school or
international doctoral programme
•
Intensive support from a group of
academic staff.
•
Structured doctoral programmes
often have a strong international
orientation with English as the team
language.
Doctoral programmes in Germany
Studying in Germany | Page 34
Research organisations and
research funding
•
Max Planck Society: Non-profit research organisation,
oversees 82 Max Planck Institutes, focuses on research in
the natural and social sciences and the humanities, closely
cooperates with universities. www.mpg.de
•
Fraunhofer Society: Organisation for applied research and
development services, oversees more than 60 research
facilities. www.fraunhofer.de
•
German Research Foundation (DFG): Largest research
funding organisation in Europe. www.dfg.de
•
Alexander von Humboldt Foundation: Non-profit foundation
funded by the German federal government and dedicated to
supporting international research cooperation. www.avh.de
Last update: April 2014
More information
Studying in Germany | Page 35
Links
•
Studying in Germany, study opportunities, scholarships:
www.study-in.de/en
•
Universities, study opportunities, contact addresses:
www.hochschulkompass.de/en
•
International Offices at universities throughout Germany:
www.daad.de/aaa
•
Scholarship database: www.funding-guide.de
•
International programmes: www.daad.de/international-programmes
•
Summer courses (preparatory language and specialist courses):
www.daad.de/sommerkurse
•
Social, financial and organisational aspects:
www.international-students.de/en
Summary
Studying in Germany | Page 36
Five good reasons to study in Germany
•
First-class service for international
students
•
Diverse range of study
opportunities
•
Excellence in research and
instruction
•
Close link between theory and
practice
•
Strong international focus
Studying in Germany | Page 37
Danke und auf Wiedersehen!
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