Uploaded by Stephanie Scoggin

WWI and the Treaty of Versailles

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World War 1 and the
Presentation, Graphic Organizers, & Activities
STANDARDS:
SS6H7 The student will explain conflict and change in
Europe to the 21st century.
a. Describe major developments following World War I:
the Russian Revolution, the Treaty of Versailles,
worldwide depression, and the rise of Nazism.
© Brain Wrinkles
TEACHER INFO: CLOZE Notes
• The next pages are handouts for the
students to use for note-taking during
the presentation. (Print front to back to
save paper and ink.)
• Check the answers as a class after the
presentation.
© Brain Wrinkles
World War I
• World War I began in June 1914 and the fighting ______________________ .
• Even though the event that sparked the war is easy to pinpoint, the actual causes of WWI
are complicated and ______________________ of the countries involved.
• There are ______________________ of World War I...
Militarism
• Countries had built strong militaries to ______________________ and their colonies, and
militarism increased as countries competed with each other to build up their armies and
navies.
• During this time, the military was ______________________ with the countries’ politics
and economics.
• Between ______________________ , Germany and France doubled the size of their
armies, while Great Britain and Germany used their navies to compete for dominance of
the seas.
• Tensions rose as countries watched each other ______________________ .
Alliances
• European countries made agreements with each other to better
______________________ .
• If one member was attacked, the others were ______________________ .
• When the war began, on one side were the Allies: Great Britain, France, Russia,
______________________ , and Belgium.
• The other side were the Central Powers: Germany, ______________________ , Bulgaria,
and the Ottoman Empire.
Imperialism
• Imperialism is when a country increases it power and wealth by
______________________ under its control.
• ______________________ as countries tried to grab more and more colonies throughout
Africa and Asia.
• The rush for land acquisition caused many European countries to
______________________ one another.
Nationalism
• Nationalism is when citizens ______________________ in their home country.
• As countries ______________________ , a strong sense of nationalism emerged.
• Many Europeans began to feel that their ______________________ to all others.
• Nationalism was exceptionally high in ______________________ , a small nation south of
Austria-Hungary, and in ______________________ , a region located in southern AustriaHungary.
• A large Slavic population lived in both Serbia and Bosnia, and the ethnic group strongly
desired their ______________________ , free from Austria-Hungary’s control.
• These nationalistic feelings led to the actual event that ______________________ .
© Brain Wrinkles
Outbreak of War
• On June 28, 1914, ______________________ , the heir to the Austro-Hungarian
throne, was assassinated.
• The assassin was a Bosnian Serb who wanted to ______________________
from the Austro-Hungarian Empire and unite it with Serbia.
• 48 hours after the assassination, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, which
set off a ______________________ of European countries joining the war.
WWI Ends
• Both sides of the war believed it would be over in less than a year; unfortunately,
it lasted over ______________________ .
• Europe suffered terrible destruction and ______________________ soldiers and
civilians died.
• America’s entry into the war gave the Allies the ______________________ they
needed to defeat the Central Powers.
• In November 11, 1918, the ______________________ to the Allies and signed
an armistice that ended the war.
In Conclusion
• ______________________ in Asia and Africa helped lead to World War I
because:
• Europeans ______________________ in their countries.
• They had developed ______________________ to protect their colonies.
• European countries had ______________________ towards one another and had
joined alliances to protect themselves.
What Next?
• When fighting ended in 1918, the Allied Powers were victorious, but all of Europe
had suffered ______________________ .
• One by one, the Central Powers ______________________ with the Allies.
• Germany’s treaty was the last one to be signed, and it forced Germany to
______________________ for the war.
• The Treaty of Versailles was signed in Versailles, France on
______________________ and officially ended WWI.
© Brain Wrinkles
Punishment
• The Treaty of Versailles was mainly negotiated and written by the
______________________ , with little input from Germany.
• France’s Prime Minister, Georges Clemenceau, pushed for ______________________
for Germany.
• France had been devastated when Germany had invaded, and Clemenceau didn’t want
Germany to ever be strong enough to ______________________ .
• US President Woodrow Wilson and UK Prime Minister David Lloyd George were concerned
a severe punishment would start another war, but the ______________________ .
Land
• In signing the treaty, Germany had to give up one million square
______________________ , some of which had been seized by Germany prior to
WWI.
• The majority of the land that was lost was ______________________ and could have
been used to boost Germany’s poor economy.
• Germany also lost all of ______________________ .
Reparations
• In addition to accepting the blame for starting the war, Germany had to
______________________ to other countries for the damages they had suffered as a
result of the war.
• Germany owed ______________________ in reparations.
• This was difficult for Germany to pay because it also had to
______________________ and infrastructure.
Military
• In order to keep Germany weak, the treaty forced Germany to
______________________ and stop production of nearly all war materials.
• Germany was also prohibited from ______________________ .
Resentment
• The majority of Germans ______________________ the harsh restrictions put in
place by the Treaty of Versailles.
• As economic conditions throughout the country worsened, many Germans
______________________ .
• Germany had ______________________ and was distrusted by other countries.
• Even though the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I, the severe consequences
given to Germany set events in motion that would eventually lead to
______________________ .
© Brain Wrinkles
League of Nations
• The Treaty of Versailles also created the ______________________ , a group of countries
that promised to work together to make sure that another world war would not occur.
• Germany was not allowed to join until ______________________ .
• The US Senate ______________________ the Treaty of Versailles and never became a
member of the League of Nations.
• The League had ______________________ and turned out to be too weak.
Germany
• The war had left Germany ______________________ .
• As its people starved and the country lay in chaos, the Allies gave them a bill that they simply
could ______________________ .
• The Treaty of Versailles caused Germany to go through an ______________________ .
Depression
• Germany was not the only country who ______________________ .
• Countries around the world fell into a ______________________ following World War I.
• European economies were in terrible shape because they had suffered
______________________ and severe loss of life.
• These countries had borrowed money during the war, but now had no money to
______________________ .
• They also experienced ______________________ , a condition where prices rise and money
loses purchasing power.
U.S.
• The United States suffered from the Great Depression beginning in October 1929 when the
______________________ .
• Value of stocks began to drop so stockholders began to ______________________ as fast as
they could.
• Businesses could no longer sell their goods because people had less money to spend, so many
had to close & workers ______________________ .
• People couldn’t ______________________ to the bank, so they lost everything (homes, farms,
etc.).
Worldwide
• Businesses around the world ______________________ .
• When the US stopped buying goods, it ______________________ in other countries.
• When ______________________ , banks in other countries were hurt too
• Stockholders in other countries could ______________________ their stocks to American
companies
• As businesses and factories around the world ______________________ , buying and selling
almost stopped.
© Brain Wrinkles
World War I
• World War I began in June 1914 and the fighting ended in November 1918.
• Even though the event that sparked the war is easy to pinpoint, the actual causes of WWI are
complicated and intertwined with the histories of the countries involved.
• There are four M.A.I.N. causes of World War I...
Militarism
• Countries had built strong militaries to protect themselves and their colonies, and militarism
increased as countries competed with each other to build up their armies and navies.
• During this time, the military was given top priority with the countries’ politics and economics.
• Between 1870 and 1914, Germany and France doubled the size of their armies, while Great
Britain and Germany used their navies to compete for dominance of the seas.
• Tensions rose as countries watched each other build up military power.
Alliances
• European countries made agreements with each other to better protect themselves.
• If one member was attacked, the others were obligated to help.
• When the war began, on one side were the Allies: Great Britain, France, Russia, Serbia, and
Belgium.
• The other side were the Central Powers: Germany, Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman
Empire.
Imperialism
• Imperialism is when a country increases it power and wealth by acquiring new lands under its
control.
• Rivalries developed as countries tried to grab more and more colonies throughout Africa and
Asia.
• The rush for land acquisition caused many European countries to resent and distrust one
another.
Nationalism
• Nationalism is when citizens feel fierce pride in their home country.
• As countries expanded their empires, a strong sense of nationalism emerged.
• Many Europeans began to feel that their nation was superior to all others.
• Nationalism was exceptionally high in Serbia, a small nation south of Austria-Hungary, and in
Bosnia, a region located in southern Austria-Hungary.
• A large Slavic population lived in both Serbia and Bosnia, and the ethnic group strongly desired
their own country, free from Austria-Hungary’s control.
• These nationalistic feelings led to the actual event that sparked World War I.
© Brain Wrinkles
Outbreak of War
• On June 28, 1914, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was
assassinated.
• The assassin was a Bosnian Serb who wanted to free Bosnia from the Austro-Hungarian
Empire and unite it with Serbia.
• 48 hours after the assassination, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia, which set off a
chain reaction of European countries joining the war.
WWI Ends
• Both sides of the war believed it would be over in less than a year; unfortunately, it lasted over
four years.
• Europe suffered terrible destruction and over 22 million soldiers and civilians died.
• America’s entry into the war gave the Allies the extra power they needed to defeat the Central
Powers.
• In November 11, 1918, the Central Powers surrendered to the Allies and signed an armistice
that ended the war.
In Conclusion
• European empire building in Asia and Africa helped lead to World War I because:
• Europeans felt fierce pride in their countries.
• They had developed strong militaries to protect their colonies.
• European countries had built up resentments towards one another and had joined alliances to
protect themselves.
What Next?
• When fighting ended in 1918, the Allied Powers were victorious, but all of Europe had suffered
terrible destruction.
• One by one, the Central Powers signed treaties with the Allies.
• Germany’s treaty was the last one to be signed, and it forced Germany to accept the blame for
the war.
• The Treaty of Versailles was signed in Versailles, France on June 28, 1919 and officially ended
WWI.
© Brain Wrinkles
Punishment
•
•
•
•
The Treaty of Versailles was mainly negotiated and written by the leaders of the Allies, with
little input from Germany.
France’s Prime Minister, Georges Clemenceau, pushed for harsh punishment for Germany.
France had been devastated when Germany had invaded, and Clemenceau didn’t want Germany
to ever be strong enough to start another war.
US President Woodrow Wilson and UK Prime Minister David Lloyd George were concerned a
severe punishment would start another war, but the concerns were ignored.
Land
• In signing the treaty, Germany had to give up one million square miles of land, some of which
had been seized by Germany prior to WWI.
• The majority of the land that was lost was rich in natural resources and could have been used
to boost Germany’s poor economy.
• Germany also lost all of its colonies.
Reparations
• In addition to accepting the blame for starting the war, Germany had to pay reparations to
other countries for the damages they had suffered as a result of the war.
• Germany owed $33 billion in reparations.
• This was difficult for Germany to pay because it also had to rebuild its own economy and
infrastructure.
Military
• In order to keep Germany weak, the treaty forced Germany to limit its military and stop
production of nearly all war materials.
• Germany was also prohibited from joining with Austria.
Resentment
• The majority of Germans strongly resented the harsh restrictions put in place by the Treaty of
Versailles.
• As economic conditions throughout the country worsened, many Germans began protesting.
• Germany had become isolated and was distrusted by other countries.
• Even though the Treaty of Versailles ended World War I, the severe consequences given to
Germany set events in motion that would eventually lead to World War II.
© Brain Wrinkles
League of Nations
• The Treaty of Versailles also created the League of Nations, a group of countries that promised
to work together to make sure that another world war would not occur.
• Germany was not allowed to join until 1926.
• The US Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of Versailles and never became a member of the
League of Nations.
• The League had no enforcement powers and turned out to be too weak.
Germany
• The war had left Germany almost bankrupt.
• As its people starved and the country lay in chaos, the Allies gave them a bill that they simply
could not afford to pay.
• The Treaty of Versailles caused Germany to go through an economic depression.
Depression
• Germany was not the only country who suffered.
• Countries around the world fell into a worldwide depression following World War I.
• European economies were in terrible shape because they had suffered property damage and
severe loss of life.
• These countries had borrowed money during the war, but now had no money to repay those
debts.
• They also experienced inflation, a condition where prices rise and money loses purchasing power.
U.S.
• The United States suffered from the Great Depression beginning in October 1929 when the
stock market crashed.
• Value of stocks began to drop so stockholders began to sell their stocks as fast as they could.
• Businesses could no longer sell their goods because people had less money to spend, so many
had to close & workers lost their jobs.
• People couldn’t repay their loans to the bank, so they lost everything (homes, farms, etc.).
Worldwide
• Businesses around the world traded with the US.
• When the US stopped buying goods, it hurt businesses in other countries.
• When US banks closed, banks in other countries were hurt too
• Stockholders in other countries could no longer sell their stocks to American companies
• As businesses and factories around the world closed one by one, buying and selling almost
stopped.
© Brain Wrinkles
Causes of
© Brain Wrinkles
• World War I began in June 1914 and the
fighting ended in November 1918.
• Even though the event that sparked the
war is easy to pinpoint, the actual causes
of WWI are complicated and intertwined
with the histories of the countries
involved.
• There are four M.A.I.N. causes of World
War I...
© Brain Wrinkles
•
Countries had built strong militaries to protect
themselves and their colonies, and militarism increased
as countries competed with each other to build up their
armies and navies.
•
During this time, the military was given top priority with
the countries’ politics and economics.
•
Between 1870 and 1914, Germany and France doubled
the size of their armies, while Great Britain and
Germany used their navies to compete for dominance
of the seas.
•
Tensions rose as countries watched each other build up
military power.
© Brain Wrinkles
• European countries made agreements with each
other to better protect themselves.
• If one member was attacked, the others were
obligated to help.
• When the war began, on one side were the Allies:
Great Britain, France, Russia, Serbia, and Belgium.
• The other side were the Central Powers: Germany,
Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, and the Ottoman
Empire.
© Brain Wrinkles
• Imperialism is when a country increases it
power and wealth by acquiring new lands under
its control.
• Rivalries developed as countries tried to grab
more and more colonies throughout Africa and
Asia.
• The rush for land acquisition caused many
European countries to resent and distrust one
another.
• Nationalism is when citizens feel fierce
pride in their home country.
• As countries expanded their empires, a
strong sense of nationalism emerged.
• Many Europeans began to feel that their
nation was superior to all others.
• Nationalism was exceptionally high in Serbia, a
small nation south of Austria-Hungary, and in
Bosnia, a region located in southern AustriaHungary.
• A large Slavic population lived in both Serbia and
Bosnia, and the ethnic group strongly desired
their own country, free from Austria-Hungary’s
control.
• These nationalistic feelings led to the actual
event that sparked World War I.
• On June 28, 1914, Archduke Francis Ferdinand, the
heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne, was
assassinated.
• The assassin was a Bosnian Serb who wanted to
free Bosnia from the Austro-Hungarian Empire
and unite it with Serbia.
• 48 hours after the assassination, AustriaHungary declared war on Serbia, which set off a
chain reaction of European countries joining the
war.
Archduke Franz Ferdinand
with his Wife, Sophie, and
3 Children
1910
© Brain Wrinkles
•
Both sides of the war believed it would be over in
less than a year; unfortunately, it lasted over four
years.
•
Europe suffered terrible destruction and over 22
million soldiers and civilians died.
•
America’s entry into the war gave the Allies the
extra power they needed to defeat the Central
Powers.
•
In November 11, 1918, the Central Powers
surrendered to the Allies and signed an armistice
that ended the war.
Celebrating the End of WWI
© Brain Wrinkles
• European empire building in Asia and Africa
helped lead to World War I because:
• Europeans felt fierce pride in their countries.
• They had developed strong militaries to protect
their colonies.
• European countries had built up resentments
towards one another and had joined alliances to
protect themselves.
The
© Brain Wrinkles
•
When fighting ended in 1918, the Allied Powers
were victorious, but all of Europe had suffered
terrible destruction.
•
One by one, the Central Powers signed treaties
with the Allies.
•
Germany’s treaty was the last one to be signed,
and it forced Germany to accept the blame for the
war.
•
The Treaty of Versailles was signed in Versailles,
France on June 28, 1919 and officially ended WWI.
© Brain Wrinkles
•
The Treaty of Versailles was mainly negotiated and
written by the leaders of the Allies, with little input
from Germany.
•
France’s Prime Minister, Georges Clemenceau, pushed
for harsh punishment for Germany.
• France had been devastated when Germany had
invaded, and Clemenceau didn’t want Germany to
ever be strong enough to start another war.
•
US President Woodrow Wilson and UK Prime Minister
David Lloyd George were concerned a severe punishment
would start another war, but the concerns were ignored.
The Big Four
© Brain Wrinkles
• In signing the treaty, Germany had to give up
one million square miles of land, some of
which had been seized by Germany prior to
WWI.
• The majority of the land that was lost was
rich in natural resources and could have been
used to boost Germany’s poor economy.
• Germany also lost all of its colonies.
© Brain Wrinkles
• In addition to accepting the blame for
starting the war, Germany had to pay
reparations to other countries for the
damages they had suffered as a result of
the war.
• Germany owed $33 billion in reparations.
• This was difficult for Germany to pay
because it also had to rebuild its own
economy and infrastructure.
• In order to keep Germany weak, the
treaty forced Germany to limit its military
and stop production of nearly all war
materials.
• Germany was also prohibited from joining
with Austria.
•
The majority of Germans strongly resented the
harsh restrictions put in place by the Treaty of
Versailles.
•
As economic conditions throughout the country
worsened, many Germans began protesting.
•
Germany had become isolated and was distrusted
by other countries.
•
Even though the Treaty of Versailles ended World
War I, the severe consequences given to Germany
set events in motion that would eventually lead to
World War II.
Excerpt from a German newspaper on the
day the treaty was signed...
“Today in the Hall of Mirrors of
Versailles the disgraceful
Treaty is being signed.
Do not forget it. The German
people will press forward to
reconquer the place among
nations to which we deserve.
Then will come revenge for the
shame of 1919.”
© Brain Wrinkles
© Brain Wrinkles
•
The Treaty of Versailles also created the League of
Nations, a group of countries that promised to work
together to make sure that another world war
would not occur.
•
Germany was not allowed to join until 1926.
•
The US Senate refused to ratify the Treaty of
Versailles and never became a member of the
League of Nations.
•
The League had no enforcement powers and turned
out to be too weak.
© Brain Wrinkles
© Brain Wrinkles
© Brain Wrinkles
• The war had left Germany almost
bankrupt.
• As its people starved and the country lay
in chaos, the Allies gave them a bill that
they simply could not afford to pay.
• The Treaty of Versailles caused Germany
to go through an economic depression.
•
Germany wasn’t the only country who suffered.
•
Countries around the world fell into a worldwide
depression following World War I.
•
European economies were in terrible shape because
they had suffered property damage and severe
loss of life.
•
These countries had borrowed money during the
war, but now had no money to repay those debts.
•
They also experienced inflation, a condition where
prices rise and money loses purchasing power.
© Brain Wrinkles
• The United States suffered from the Great
Depression beginning in October 1929 when the
stock market crashed.
• Value of stocks began to drop so stockholders
began to sell their stocks as fast as they could.
• Businesses could no longer sell their goods
because people had less money to spend, so
many had to close & workers lost their jobs.
• People couldn’t repay their loans to the bank, so
they lost everything (homes, farms, etc.).
© Brain Wrinkles
• Businesses around the world traded with the US.
• When the US stopped buying goods, it hurt businesses
in other countries.
• When US banks closed, banks in other countries were
hurt, too.
• Stockholders in other countries could no longer sell
their stocks to American companies
• As businesses and factories around the world closed
one by one, buying and selling almost stopped.
TEACHER INFO: A Novel Event
• Print off the Novel Event handout for each student.
• Have the students create a historical fiction novel
based on one of the M.A.I.N. causes of World War I.
• They will create a title and draw an illustration of the
cause/event on the cover of the book.
• In the textbox, they will write a description of their
book.
© Brain Wrinkles
Directions: Create a historical fiction book based on
one of the M.A.I.N. causes of WWI. Write the title and
draw a historically accurate illustration of the
cause/event on the cover. Inside the textbox, write a
description of the book.
Book Description:
© Brain Wrinkles
TEACHER INFO: Treaty of Versailles
Foldable
•
•
•
•
•
Print off the foldable for each student.
The students will cut the template out along the thick,
outside lines.
Next, they will cut along the thin lines that divide each word,
stopping at the gray rectangle.
They should attach the side of the template (gray
rectangle) to their notebooks.
They will now be able to open up each flap and write
information about each restriction that the treaty put on
Germany underneath.
© Brain Wrinkles
© Brain Wrinkles
Responsibility
Land
Reparations
Military
© Brain Wrinkles
Germany had to accept the blame for the
outbreak of World War I
Germany lost one million square miles of land
and all of its colonies.
Germany had to pay $33 billion dollars in
reparations to the Allies for their losses.
Germany had to limit its armed forces and stop
production of nearly all war materials.
TEACHER INFO: Two Viewpoints
• Print off the Two Viewpoints printable for each student.
• The left lens will represent the perspective of the Allies. On
the left lens of the glasses, the students will write how the
Allies feel about the Treaty of Versailles. They will also include
a small illustration that represents this viewpoint.
• The right lens will represent the perspective of Germany. On
the right lens of the glasses, the students will write how
Germany feels about the treaty. They will also include a small
illustration that represents this viewpoint.
• Have the students color & cut out the glasses when finished.
© Brain Wrinkles
Two Viewpoints
Directions: On the left lens, write how the Allies feel about the Treaty of Versailles. In the right lens, write how Germany feels
about the treaty. Include a small illustration or symbol to summarize each viewpoint.
Allies
© Brain Wrinkles
Germany
Treaty of
Versailles
TEACHER INFO: History Storyboard
• Print off the History Storyboard printable for each
student.
• The students will create a sequence of events that
shows Germany’s role in the major events of this
time period (WWI, Treaty of Versailles, & worldwide
depression).
• They will write a caption and draw an illustration to
portray each event.
© Brain Wrinkles
History Storyboard
Directions: Create a storyboard that shows Germany’s role in the major events of this time period (WWI, Treaty of Versailles, &
Worldwide Depression). Write a caption and draw an illustration to portray each event.
1. _______________________________
2. _______________________________
3. _______________________________
4. _______________________________
5. _______________________________
6. _______________________________
© Brain Wrinkles
TEACHER INFO: Comprehension Check
• Print off the Comprehension Check for
each student.
• After the lesson, have the students
answer the questions. *This could also
be used as a quiz.
© Brain Wrinkles
1. When did WWI begin and end?
2. What are the four M.A.I.N. causes of WWI?
3. Which treaty was signed by Germany and the Allied Powers and officially
ended WWI?
4. Which country did the Treaty of Versailles force to accept the blame of
WWI?
5. Besides taking responsibility for the war, what other restrictions did the
treaty impose?
6. Why did France push for harsh punishment of Germany?
7. How did the majority of Germans feel about the treaty’s restrictions?
8. What group did the Treaty of Versailles establish?
9. What was the purpose of this group?
10. Which of the Treaty of Versailles terms impacted Germany’s economy the
most?
11. What happened to many countries’ currencies during the worldwide
depression?
© Brain Wrinkles
1. When did WWI begin and end?
1914-1918
2. What are the four M.A.I.N. causes of WWI?
Militarism, Alliances, Imperialism, Nationalism
3. Which treaty was signed by Germany and the Allied Powers and officially
ended WWI?
Treaty of Versailles
4. Which country did the Treaty of Versailles force to accept the blame of
WWI?
Germany
5. Besides taking responsibility for the war, what other restrictions did the
treaty impose?
Germany lost land and colonies, could not rebuild its military, had to pay
reparations
6. Why did France push for harsh punishment of Germany?
France had been devastated when Germany had invaded, & didn’t want Germany
to ever be strong enough to start another war
7. How did the majority of Germans feel about the treaty’s restrictions?
Resented it and began protests
8. What group did the Treaty of Versailles establish?
League of Nations
9. What was the purpose of this group?
group of countries that promised to work together to make sure that another
world war would not occur
10. Which of the Treaty of Versailles terms impacted Germany’s economy the
most?
Germany had to pay $33 billion in reparations to the Allies
11. What happened to many countries’ currencies during the worldwide
depression?
Inflation
© Brain Wrinkles
TEACHER INFO: TICKET OUT THE DOOR
•
Print out the exit slip page for each student.
•
Have students create an emoticon symbol to
represent each of the following: causes of WWI,
Treaty of Versailles, & worldwide depression.
•
On the back of the slip, students will write a brief
description of each emoji and how it is significant to
the event.
© Brain Wrinkles
Name:
Create an emoticon to depict each of the following: causes
of WWI, Treaty of Versailles, & worldwide depression . On
the back of this slip, describe the importance of each emoji.
© Brain Wrinkles
Name:
Create an emoticon to depict each of the following: causes
of WWI, Treaty of Versailles, & worldwide depression . On
the back of this slip, describe the importance of each emoji.
© Brain Wrinkles
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forward to reading your feedback in my store.
If you like this file, you might want to check out some of my other
products that teach social studies topics in creative, engaging,
and hands-on ways.
Best wishes,
Ansley at Brain Wrinkles
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