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EPQ Toolkit for AQA

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Lesson 1

Introducing the EPQ

Lesson 1 Introducing the EPQ

INTRODUCING THE EPQ

What is the EPQ?

The Extended Project Qualification.

Equivalent to half of an A-level.

Part of Advanced Diploma or Baccalaureate.

Taken alongside an A-level or BTEC programme.

Value of the EPQ?

Independent work.

Self-guided.

1/4

Book page 4

Lesson 1 Introducing the EPQ

THE BENEFITS OF THE EPQ

Working with others.

Working to deadlines.

Planning and management of a project.

Decision making and problem solving.

Presentation skills.

Communication skills.

Plus:

Learn skills for University-level study.

Achieve UCAS points without sitting an exam.

2/4

Book page 4

See exercise 0.1

Lesson 1 Introducing the EPQ

EPQ AT A GLANCE

Individual or group?

Individual submission.

Format?

Written report, essay, artefact, play …

Topic?

Cannot be directly related to your studies (dual accreditation).

Taught element (30 hours) and independent work (90 hours).

3/4

Book page 5

Lesson 1 Introducing the EPQ

EPQ IN MORE DETAIL

4/4

Book pages 6–7

AO1 Manage the project: Clear aims and objectives, evidence of planning.

AO2 Use resources: Well-focused research.

AO3 Develop and realise: Autonomy, clear plan, well-written report, evidence of the journey.

AO4 Review: Reflecting on what you have learned.

Your supervisor helps you through your project and marks the final version.

Material that is assessed:

PRODUCTION LOG.

Written REPORT.

Record of the PRESENTATION.

The centre coordinator oversees the whole process.

See exercise 0.2

An external moderator checks the marks given by your supervisor.

Lesson 2

Ideas for a topic title

Lesson 2 Ideas for a topic title

THE TAUGHT ELEMENT

EPQ takes about 120 hours, taught element = 30 hours:

Safety skills.

ICT skills.

Research skills.

Project management skills.

Personal, learning, thinking skills.

Sub-specific skills.

See suggested scheme of work on page 11.

1/3

Book pages 10–11

Lesson 2 Ideas for a topic title

PROJECT IDEAS FROM THE PAST

2/3

Book pages 12–13

Extending your studies.

An artefact.

A newspaper article or TV programme.

Doing own research on a topic you’d like to study at University.

A performance.

Cross-curricular topic.

Examples of good evaluative titles

Should the care of those suffering with Alzheimer’s disease be the responsibility of government?

How to raise a thousand pounds for a local charity.

Can I design and make a platform shoe in the style of the 1970s?

See exercise 1.2

Lesson 2 Ideas for a topic title

THINGS TO AVOID

Overly ambitious topics.

Emotive issues.

Where you have a personal axe to grind.

Socially sensitive topics.

Dual accreditation.

Don’t try to be too original.

Avoid being too narrow or too broad.

3/3

Book pages 14–15

See exercise 1.3

Lesson 3

A preliminary literature review

Lesson 3 A preliminary literature review

DRILLING DOWN

A literature review = a systematic consideration of what other people have written or said about your chosen topic.

Literature = books, magazines, websites, TV programmes …

Use this preliminary literature review later when completing the

PART A: CANDIDATE PROPOSAL form.

Example:

1/2

Book page 16

Lesson 3 A preliminary literature review

A FLOWCHART

FOR DOING YOUR

PRELIMINARY

LITERATURE

REVIEW

2/2

Book pages 16–17

See exercise 1.4

Lesson 4

Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL

Lesson 4 Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL

THE PRE-PROJECT PROPOSAL FORM

You have now:

Completed some preliminary research.

Selected a topic.

Time to formally propose your project so it can be approved.

WHO is affected by the topic?

WHAT are the major questions for this topic?

WHERE is your topic important?

WHEN is your topic important?

Felix, who did the EPQ on Fracking.

1/5

Book page 18

See exercise 1.5

Lesson 4 Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL 2/5

CONSTRUCTING THE RECORD OF INITIAL IDEAS

Book pages 19–20

The RECORD OF INITIAL IDEAS (page 5 of the EPQ candidate record).

STEP 1: Fill in the first two elements.

STEP 2: Discuss your ideas with your supervisor.

STEP 3: Record your supervisor’s comments on the form.

STEP 4: Modify your ideas and record your changes.

Lesson 4 Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL 3/5

CONSTRUCTING PART A: CANDIDATE PROPOSAL

Book page 21

STEP 5:

PART A: CANDIDATE PROPOSAL (page 6 of the EPQ candidate record).

Beforehand: arrange an interim meeting with supervisor.

PART B: SUPERVISOR’S COMMENTS ON CANDIDATE PROPOSAL filled in by supervisor (page 7).

PART C: CENTRE COORDINATOR’S APPROVAL OF CANDIDATE PROPOSAL filled in by centre coordinator (page 8).

See next slide for copies of forms.

Harriet did an EPQ on the Olympics.

Lesson 4 Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL 4/5

Book page 21

Lesson 4 Writing the CANDIDATE PROPOSAL

THE ROLE OF YOUR SUPERVISOR

5/5

DO

DO

DO set ground rules.

take responsibility.

use the support effectively.

DON’T go it alone.

DON’T let your supervisor be too directive.

DON’T be disorganised.

YOU arrange the meetings.

Make checklist of what has to be done with supervisor.

Record supervisor’s comments.

Book pages 22_23

See exercise 1.6

Your supervisor.

Don't be a puppet.

Lesson 5

Introducing the PRODUCTION LOG and the reviewing process

Lesson 5 Introducing the PRODUCTION LOG and the reviewing process

THE PRODUCTION LOG

The EPQ is not about the PRODUCT – it’s about the PRODUCTION LOG.

The documents in the PRODUCTION LOG demonstrate your EPQ journey:

RECORD OF INITIAL IDEAS.

PARTS A, B, C: CANDIDATE PROPOSAL.

PLANNING REVIEW .

MID-PROJECT REVIEW .

PROJECT PRODUCT REVIEW .

(Described on next slide.)

PRESENTATION RECORD.

SUMMARY AND REFLECTION.

1/2

Book page 26

Lesson 5 Introducing the PRODUCTION LOG and the reviewing process

THE REVIEW DOCUMENTS

PLANNING REVIEW

Next steps in planning.

Supervisor’s advice.

Modifications made.

2/2

Book pages 27–29

MID-PROJECT REVIEW

How your project has developed.

Supervisor’s advice.

Modifications made.

Final title.

Next steps.

PROJECT PRODUCT REVIEW

Was revised plan followed?

Supervisor’s advice.

• Modifications made.

Lesson 6

Plan your time and objectives

Lesson 6 Plan your time and objectives

TIME MANAGEMENT

Threats to effective time management:

Lack of objectives.

Lack of clarity about the task.

Disorganisation.

Unforeseen crises or commitments.

Perfectionism.

Performance-debilitating circumstances.

Procrastination.

1/4

Book page 30

See exercise 2.1

Lesson 6 Plan your time and objectives

TIME MANAGEMENT

(continued)

Effective time management includes:

Having clear objectives.

A good plan.

Classify tasks.

Use a timetable.

Don’t be distracted.

Focus on one thing.

Review each activity before you leave it.

Reward yourself.

Reward yourself.

2/4

Book page 31

See exercise 2.2

Lesson 6 Plan your time and objectives

SETTING YOUR AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

SMART

S specific

M measurable

A achievable

R realistic

T timed

• A agreed

3/4

Book pages 32–33

See exercise 2.3

Lesson 6 Plan your time and objectives 4/4

MAKING A GENERAL PLAN

It is more difficult making a plan for 90 hours of work than for short deadlines.

Exemplar 1: Part of Rosie's plan.

Exemplar 2: Part of Jack's plan.

Exemplar 1

List all the tasks.

‘Slack’ time built in.

‘Achieved’ column.

Book pages 34–35

Exemplar 2

Lists all the sections.

Tasks within the section.

Lesson 7

Communicating changes

Lesson 7 Communicating changes

WHERE THESE ARE COMMUNICATED

AQA forms revisited , to see how changes were communicated:

RECORD OF INITIAL IDEAS

PLANNING REVIEW

MID-PROJECT REVIEW

PROJECT PRODUCT REVIEW

1/1

Book pages 36–37

See exercise 2.4

Lesson 8

Additional management tools

Lesson 8 Additional management tools

PRODUCTION OF TIMELINES AND DIARY OF

PROGRESS

Part of Megan's planning.

• These are optional extras.

Excellent evidence of management.

Do not make the mistake of thinking that ‘the more I write, the better Grade I will get’.

1/3

Options :

Initial production timetable.

Secondary production timetable.

Diary of progress.

Diary of issues.

Final production timetable.

Book pages 38–39

Lesson 8 Additional management tools

GANTT CHART

Shows the timing of each task .

Column 1: A list of activities.

Row 1: A suitable time scale.

A bar represents each activity.

Length of bar represents start, duration and end date.

2/3

Book pages 40–41

See exercise 2.5

Gantt, an American engineer.

Lesson 8 Additional management tools

PERT CHART

Identifies the critical path for a project.

PERT chart shows the relationship between the activities of your project.

Looks at the time needed to complete each task.

Shows the sequences in which the tasks will take place.

3/3

Book pages 42–43

See exercise 2.6

GANTT chart for same kind of project building a shed.

Lesson 9

Dealing with data

Lesson 9 Dealing with data

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY DATA

Primary data

Data collected first hand from your own research.

No requirement

to use primary data in your study.

Secondary data

Data collected by someone else.

Your literature review collects secondary data.

1/2

Book page 46

Lesson 9 Dealing with data

QUANTITATIVE AND QUALITATIVE DATA

Quantitative data

How much, i.e. quantity.

Summarised using measures of central tendency and dispersion and graphs.

Qualitative data

Non-numerical, e.g. words or pictures.

Analysed thematically.

Can count the number of times a word is used, becomes quantitative.

2/2

Book page 47

See exercise 3.1

A picture can be described quantitatively or qualitatively.

Lessons 10 & 11

Collecting primary data

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

IDENTIFYING ETHICAL ISSUES

A conflict between what a researcher wants and the rights of the participant.

Informed consent.

Deception.

Right to withdraw.

Protection of participants.

Anonymity and confidentiality.

Privacy.

1/7

Book pages 48–49

See exercise 3.2

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

DEALING WITH ETHICAL ISSUES

Before study: Gaining informed consent

Rationale.

Why participants selected.

Right to withdraw.

What they are required to do.

How data stored.

After study: Debriefing

Title of study.

Thank you.

Purpose of study, how findings used.

Rationale for any deception.

Confirm anonymity.

Right to withdraw data.

Enquire about any possible distress.

Your contact details.

2/7

Book pages 50–51

See exercise 3.3

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

SAMPLING

Selecting a sample

Define target population.

Either use whole target population or aim to select a representative sample.

Probability sampling

Random.

Systematic.

Stratified.

Non-probability sampling

Convenience.

Self-selected/volunteer.

Quota.

Snowball.

3/7

Book pages 52–53

See exercise 3.4

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

SELF-REPORT TECHNIQUES

Questionnaire = fixed set of written questions.

Interview = interviewer can adapt questions.

Step 1 Developing good questions .

Clarity (e.g. jargon, double-barrelled, double negative).

Bias (leading questions).

Analysis (closed versus open questions).

Step 2 Design a good questionnaire.

Order of questions.

Variety.

Response set.

Filler questions.

Distribution.

4/7

Book pages 54–55

See exercise 3.5

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

SELF-REPORT TECHNIQUES

(continued)

Step 3 Pilot study.

Stage 1:

• Select small representative sample.

• Test instructions, questions, equipment.

Stage 2: Make changes.

Step 4 Considering reliability and validity.

Internal reliability – split half.

External reliability – test-retest.

Internal validity – leading questions, social desirability bias.

External validity – population validity.

Step 5 Select sample.

5/7

Book pages 56–57

See exercise 3.6

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

OBSERVATIONAL TECHNIQUES

Recording data , behavioural categories should:

Be clearly organised.

Cover all possible components.

Be mutually exclusive.

Sampling procedures

Event sampling.

Time sampling.

Other things about observations

Naturalistic and controlled.

Overt and covert.

Participant and non-participant.

6/7

Looks like P3, see coding system in textbook.

Book pages 58–59

See exercise 3.7

Considering reliability and validity.

Content analysis.

Advantages and disadvantages of observations.

Lessons 10 & 11 Collecting primary data

OTHER RESEARCH METHODS

Not sure I can take any more!

Experiments :

• IV and DV.

Observation or self-report to measure DV.

Lab, field or natural/quasi.

Extraneous/confounding variables.

Ecological validity.

Correlations.

Investigations.

Case studies.

Where to begin

Aims.

Hypothesis.

Operationalisation.

What happens at the end

Descriptive statistics.

Inferential statistics.

7/7

Book pages 60–61

See exercise 3.8

Lessons 12 & 13

Full literature review

Lessons 12 & 13 Full literature review

SECONDARY SOURCES

1. Wikipedia .

2. The Internet.

• Cross check.

Be selective.

Peer-reviewed.

Search engines.

Record details (see table).

3. Other credible sources:

• A-level textbooks.

Books.

Academic Journals.

Newspaper articles.

TV programmes.

1/2

Book pages 62–63

See exercise 3.9

Lessons 12 & 13 Full literature review 2/2

SECONDARY DATA USING DIFFERENT SOURCES

Synthesising sources: A literature review.

Like a funnel.

Narrow to specific area.

Group items together.

Lead logically to aims.

What the literature review should NOT be.

A descriptive list.

Feelings.

Everything.

Irrelevant material, e.g. life story.

Example of a bad literature review and improved version.

Book pages 64–65

See exercise 3.10

Lesson 14

Being analytical

Lesson 14 Being analytical

METHODS OF ANALYSIS

Analysis = examine in detail but not descriptively –

evaluate

.

Analysis method 1 : Considering conflicting arguments.

Example project: Jenny’s EPQ on Yellowstone

Analysis method 2 : Considering the value of sources used.

Source.

Author’s background.

Date published, are the findings still relevant?

Depths of reviews.

Sources cited.

Objectivity.

Justification for reliability.

1/1

Book pages 66–67

See exercise 3.11

See exercise 3.12

Lesson 15

Understanding peer review

Lesson 15 Understanding peer review

USING PEER REVIEWED JOURNALS

Peer review

Academic journals.

Books.

The Internet.

How to use peer review when evaluating sources.

1/2

Book page 68

See exercise 3.13

Lesson 15 Understanding peer review

EVALUATING PEER REVIEW

The strengths of peer review

High quality research.

Controls amount of information.

Determines ownership of intellectual property.

Also:

Guards against plagiarism.

Guards against fraud.

The limitations of peer review

Finding an expert.

Anonymity versus open reviewing.

Preserves the status quo.

2/2

Book page 69

See exercise 3.14

Lesson 16

Avoiding plagiarism

Lesson 16 Avoiding plagiarism

AVOIDING PLAGIARISM

1/2

Book pages 70–71

Plagiarism = publication of someone else’s words, thoughts, ideas without permission or credit.

Rewriting

Make it your own.

Rewrite don’t cut and paste.

Paraphrasing and summarising.

See exercise 3.15

Using quotes

Credit the sources.

Credit ideas as well as words.

What about general knowledge?

How much should I quote?

Using long quotations.

Can I cut and paste a diagram from the Internet?

How much is too much?

Lesson 16 Avoiding plagiarism

EXTRA

Examples of how to quote.

Words to use.

Other issues:

More than one author.

Introducing a long quotation.

If you need to alter a quotation.

If you remove some text from a quotation.

2/2

Book pages 72–73

Lesson 17

Preparing MID-PROJECT REVIEW

Lesson 17 Preparing MID-PROJECT REVIEW

THE MID-PROJECT REVIEW

Record your outline plan about halfway through your work.

Page 10 of the EPQ candidate record.

Good practice – see Kim’s project (page 28) and James’ project (page 37)

Changes to plan justified.

Good summary of advice from supervisor.

Show how and whether you will act on advice from supervisor.

Detailed planned next steps.

Title clear and analytical.

Bad practice – see Robert’s project (page 29)

New approval from Centre Co-ordinator may be required if approval was subject to recommendations.

1/1

Book pages 28–29, 37

Lesson 18

Beginning the report

Lesson 18 Beginning the report

WHERE DO I BEGIN?

Overcoming the blank page syndrome , for example:

Think out loud.

Write the ending first.

Change location.

What else?

Set achievable objectives

Set a timer for three minutes and see how much you can write.

Try just writing five sentences.

Each day set ACHIEVABLE GOALS.

1/1

Book pages 74–75

Lesson 19

Marking exercise

Lesson 19 Marking exercise

EXEMPLARS I, II AND III

AQA marking criteria.

How you will be assessed:

AO1 Manage (10 marks)

AO2 Use resources (10 marks)

AO3 Develop and realise (20 marks)

AO4 Review (10 marks)

Mark the exemplars on pages 108–121.

Use the AQA markscheme: see pages 9–12 of filestore.aqa.org.uk/subjects/AQA-W-7993-SP-15.PDF

1/1

Book pages 108–121

Lesson 20

Writing well

Lesson 20 Writing well

WRITING FLUENTLY AND CRITICALLY

Clear line of argument.

Well-structured paragraphs.

Points are based on evidence.

Both descriptive and critical analysis.

Avoid personal opinion.

Use precise language.

Avoid abbreviations and contradictions.

Use of quotations.

Making your point – writing a POWERFUL paragraph:

Identify the point.

Justify the point.

Elaborate upon it.

Further elaboration.

Conclusion.

1/2

Book pages 76–77

See exercise 4.2

Lesson 20 Writing well

USEFUL PHRASES

• This suggests that …

This would imply …

So we can see …

One consequence would be …

One advantage of this is …

An alternative explanation …

Therefore …

This is challenged by …

In comparison …

In contrast …

However …

One consequence would be ...

2/2

Book page 77

See exercise 4.3

Lesson 21

Writing an abstract

Lesson 21 Writing an abstract

A PLANNER FOR YOUR ABSTRACT

Abstract = A succinct summary of a piece of research.

No subheadings.

First or last?

Aim and/or hypothesis.

Relevant background literature.

Method.

Findings.

Conclusion (relate to background research).

Implications (relate to findings).

Word count 150–250 words.

1/2

Book pages 78–79

See exercise 4.4

See exercise 4.5

Lesson 22

Writing the introduction

Lesson 22 Writing the introduction

AN OVERVIEW

A starting point.

A topic sentence.

An attention-grabbing statement.

A brief outline.

Establish your research territory.

Establish a niche.

Background.

Scope of the work.

Word count up to 4000 words.

1/2

Book pages 80–81

See exercise 4.6

Lesson 22 Writing the introduction

A LITERATURE REVIEW

2/2

Relate directly to your topic.

Identify an area of controversy.

Present a summary of what we already know.

Provide a clear statement of the research questions/problems which you will be addressing.

Narrow down to the aims/hypotheses.

What order?

Chronological.

Thematic.

Book pages 80–81

Lesson 23

Writing the method

(primary data and artefact only)

Lesson 23 Writing the method

STRUCTURE FOR THE METHOD SECTION OF

THE REPORT

1. Design.

2. Participants.

3. Materials /apparatus.

4. Date(s) and location.

5. Ethical consideration.

6. Procedure.

1/1

Word count 500–600 words.

Book pages 82–83

See exercise 4.7

Writing your report is like writing a recipe for a cake.

Lesson 24

Writing the findings

(primary data only)

Lesson 24 Writing the findings

STRUCTURE FOR THE RESULTS SECTION OF

THE REPORT

1. Descriptive statistics.

2. Summarise.

• Quantitative data: tables and graphs.

Qualitative data.

3. Inferential statistics where appropriate.

4. Presenting tables and figures.

1/1

Word count 500–600 words.

Book pages 84–85

See exercise 4.8

Lesson 25

Writing the discussion

Lesson 25 Writing the discussion 1/1

Book pages 86–87

STRUCTURE FOR THE DISCUSSION SECTION

OF THE REPORT

The purpose of the discussion is to consider previously mentioned research in relation to your own research. Therefore it is not expected that you will introduce new research here.

See exercise 4.9

1. Explain the findings in relation to the hypothesis.

2. Explain the findings in relation to previous research.

3. Strengths and limitations of your project.

4. Implications.

Word count up to 4000 words.

Lesson 26

Writing a CONCLUSION

Lesson 26 Writing a CONCLUSION

WHAT IS A TAKE-HOME MESSAGE?

1/1

Book pages 88–89

Think about what you want people to remember.

First write in BLUNT terms  explain so it RESONATES.

Don’ts, e.g.:

End with a lengthy quotation.

Say ‘in conclusion’.

Introduce a new idea.

Do use:

In fact …

For these reasons … etc

Word count about 300 words.

Generic structure

Brief recap.

Reference to larger issue.

Highlight key aspects.

Evaluate main arguments.

Take home message

See exercise 4.10

Lesson 27

Editing and referencing the draft EPQ

Lesson 27 Editing and referencing the draft EPQ 1/3

FORMATS FOR REFERENCING

Book reference

Offer, D., Ostrov, E. and Howard, K. (1981).

The Adolescent – a psychological self-portrait

. New

York: Basic Books.

Papers/articles

Milner, D. (1970). Ethnic Identity and preference in minority-group children. In: H. Tajfel, (1981)

Human groups and social categories

. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp.329–356.

Journal articles

MacKay, G. (2002). The disappearance of disability? Thoughts on a changing culture.

British

Journal of Special Education

, 29 (4), 159–163.

Internet pages

Jackson, R. (2004).

Inclusion: A flawed Vision

. GSSPL [online]. Available at: www.gssp1.org.uk/html/inclusion_aflawed-vision [Accessed January 2014].

Other types

Personal communication.

Book pages 90–91

See exercise 4.11

Lesson 27 Editing and referencing the draft EPQ

ENDNOTES AND FOOTNOTES

A sequential number is placed in the text where you would normally put (Milner 1970).

Endnotes – end of chapter.

Footnotes – at bottom of the page.

Word processors will do it for you.

Exemplar using footnotes

2/3

Book page 90

Lesson 27 Editing and referencing the draft EPQ

EDITING THE DRAFT EPQ

Checklist – am I done?

This is not a list to just tick things off.

3/3

Book pages 92–93

See exercise 4.2

You have finished the report!

Lesson 28

Preparing the PROJECT PRODUCT REVIEW

Lesson 28 Preparing the PROJECT PRODUCT REVIEW

GOOD AND BAD PRACTICE

Page 11 of the EPQ candidate record.

Examples of good practice

Kim’s project (page 28), and Wesley’s project (page 37).

Example of bad practice

Robert’s project (page 29).

1/1

Book pages 28–29, 37

Lesson 29

Preparing the PRESENTATION

Lesson 29 Preparing the PRESENTATION

DIFFERENT TYPES OF VISUAL AIDS

To non-specialist audience.

Demonstrates AO1 (planning), AO2 (use of resources), AO3 (develop and realise).

Microsoft PowerPoint.

Video, DVD, YouTube.

Interactive white board.

Non-interactive board.

Paper handouts.

Flip chart.

Artefact or props.

Market place display.

A poster presentation.

1/4

Book pages 96–97

See exercise 5.1

Lesson 29 Preparing the PRESENTATION

PRESENTATION SKILLS

Preparation beforehand

Know your material.

Use notes to support the style of your presentation.

Rehearse.

It’s no laughing matter.

2/4

Book pages 98–99

On the day

Where to start.

The glass is always half full.

Be polite and assertive.

Pump up the volume?

Pace yourself.

Mind your language.

Don’t forget to breathe.

Connect with your audience!

See exercise 5.2

Lesson 29 Preparing the PRESENTATION

QUESTIONS AND CHECKLIST

Dealing with questions asked.

You are assessed on responses to questions from the audience.

Anticipate the questions and prepare.

Checklist and then …

Fill in PRESENTATION RECORD PART A (Page 12 of the EPQ candidate record).

An exemplar is on page 101.

3/4

Book pages 100–101

See exercise 5.3

Lesson 29 Preparing the PRESENTATION

ASSESSING THE PRESENTATION

You can include a

presentation feedback form

for the moderator.

Audibility.

Pace.

Fluency.

Tone and energy.

Eye contact.

Body language and posture.

Appropriateness to the audience.

Structure and cohesion.

Use of visual aids.

Verbal content.

Response to questions.

in your PRESENTATION RECORD PART B

PRESENTATION RECORD PART B – filled in by your supervisor.

4/4

Book pages 102–103

See exercise 5.4

Lesson 30

Writing the SUMMARY and REFLECTION

Lesson 30 Writing the SUMMARY and REFLECTION

THE SUMMARY

1. Brief recap of what you have covered in relation to the essay title.

2. Reference to the larger issue.

3. Highlight the important aspects.

4. Evaluate the main arguments.

5. The take-home message.

1/3

Book pages 104–105

See exercise 5.5

Lesson 30 Writing the SUMMARY and REFLECTION

WRITING A REFLECTION

1. What have you have learned from completing your project?

2. What new knowledge or expertise have you found valuable?

3. What are the strengths and weaknesses of your project?

4. What skills have you improved?

5. What changes would you make if you undertook the work again?

6. What advice would you give to others undertaking such a project?

Fill in SUMMARY AND REFLECTION after the presentation.

Page 14 of the EPQ candidate record.

2/3

Book pages 106–107

See exercise 5.6

Lesson 30 Writing the SUMMARY and REFLECTION 3/3

CONGRATULATIONS –

YOU’RE DONE

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