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figures of speech

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1897 – 1937
“The most effective way
to do it, is to do it”.
Objectives
At the end of the lesson, we will be able
to:
• Identify the figures of speech
• Express our feelings through the use of
figures of speech in different tasks
• Use figures of speech in different
activities
If you were to tell someone of
your feelings towards him /
her without directly saying it
in words, how will you do it?
Unlocking of Difficulties
Shaggy
- rough and unkempt texture
or surface
Unlocking of Difficulties
Gnaw
- bite at or nibble something
persistently
Unlocking of Difficulties
Clash
- a noise which is usually a
metallic sound of collision
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
• Words or phrases that posses a
separate meaning from its
literal definition
repeated consonant sound occurring
at the beginning of words or within
the words.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
Comparing two things by
stating that one thing is
another.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
Human actions, feelings, or
characteristics are given to
inanimate objects.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
by James Reeves
The sea is a hungry dog.
Giant and grey.
He rolls on the beach all
day.
With his clashing teeth and
shaggy jaws.
Hour upon hour he gnaws
The rumbling, tumbling
stones,
And ‘Bones, bones, bones,
The giant sea-dog moans,
Licking his greasy paws.
And when the night wind
roars
And the moon rocks in the
stormy cloud,
He bounds to his feet and
snuffs and sniffs,
Shaking his wet sides over
the cliffs.
Compares two things but the
words “like” and “as” are
used.
Concepts are contradictory to
one another but upon analysis,
it holds significant truth.
I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud
I wandered lonely as a cloud
That floats on high o’er vales and hills,
When all at once I saw a crowd,
A host, of golden daffodils;
Beside the lake, beneath the trees,
Fluttering and dancing in the breeze.
Continuous as the stars that shine
And twinkle on the milky way,
They stretched in never-ending line
Along the margin of a bay:
Ten thousand saw I at a glance,
Tossing their heads in sprightly dance.
The waves beside them danced; but they
Out-did the sparkling waves in glee:
A poet could not but be gay,
In such a jocund company:
I gazed-and-gazed but little thought
What wealth the show to me had brought:
For oft, when on my couch I lie
In vacant or in pensive mood,
They flash upon that inward eye
Which is the bliss of solitude;
And then my heart with pleasure fills,
And dances with the daffodils.
GROUP
ACTIVITY
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
Group 4
Group 5
Identify the figures of speech
used.
1. “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times”. – Charles
2.
3.
4.
5.
Dickens
“All the world’s a stage, And all men and women merely
players”. –William Shakespeare
“Fair is foul, and foul is fair: hover through the fog and filthy air”.
–William Shakespeare
And the roses were very much embarrassed from what the Little
Prince said. – The Little Prince
“I think I shall never see, a poem lovely as a tree”. - Joyce Kilmer
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